World

The Two-Way
6:56 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Campaign Finance Transparency Bill Gets Chilly Reception In Senate

A bill that would require transparency by nonprofit groups related to federal elections met with united opposition from Republicans Wednesday, at the first Senate hearing on what its supporters call the Disclose Act.

The legislation would require any politically active group that spends more than $10,000 to list its donors. It was introduced last month, with 52 senators listed as its sponsors or co-sponsors (including the chamber's two independents).

NPR's Peter Overby reports:

Read more
The Salt
6:15 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Can You Trust That Organic Label On Imported Food?

Investigators at the U.S. Department of Agriculture have discovered cases of organic fraud abroad as well as in the U.S. In 2013, 19 farmers or food companies were fined a total of $87 million for misusing the organic label.
Mark Andersen Rubberball/Corbi

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Maybe you've wondered, while looking at the price tag on some organic produce, whether that label is telling the truth.

Peter Laufer, a writer and professor of journalism at the University of Oregon, doesn't just wonder. He's an outright skeptic, especially because the organic label seems to him like a license to raise prices. And also because those products are arriving through supply chains that stretch to far corners of the world.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:07 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Fall Of The Tower Of David: Squatters Leave Venezuela's Vertical Slum

Squatters living at the Tower of David, an abandoned, unfinished skyscraper in Caracas, began to be evicted and relocated Tuesday.
Federico Parra AFP/Getty Images

Venezuela's government began to evacuate a famous "vertical slum" in Caracas Tuesday, bringing an end to a self-made community that became famous for its apocalyptic image, symbolic overtones and appearance in the Showtime series Homeland.

The half-finished skyscraper, called the "Tower of David" for its financier, David Brillembourg, was abandoned during a banking crisis in the '90s, according to The Associated Press. Years later, with the encouragement of Venezuela's late President Hugo Chavez, poor residents took over the building.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Obama Declares Emergency As Huge Fires Burn In Washington State

A burned-out car sits in front of a ruined house in this photo taken Sunday near Pateros, Wash. Large fires have destroyed hundreds of homes in the state this month.
Stephen Brashear Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 5:57 pm

Fires are still raging in Washington state, where officials hope rain might help them contain the large fires — but there's also a chance that heavy rainfall could trigger flooding and mudslides.

Fire crews have been battling several major fires in central and eastern Washington for the past two weeks. The blazes have destroyed hundreds of homes and caused wide power outages.

Read more
The Record
5:42 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

A Rational Conversation: The Sound Of TDE's Success

Kendrick Lamar (right) onstage at the BET Hip Hop Awards 2013 in Atlanta with Ali, TDE's engineer and sometimes DJ.
Rick Diamond/BET Getty Images for BET

Read more
Planet Money
5:25 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Episode 555: Why Is The Milk In The Back Of The Store?

MARIO ANZUONI Reuters /Landov

Milk is often in the very back corner of the grocery store, as far as humanly possible from the entrance. It's a strange location for milk, because it's one the most popular items.

A common explanation for this location is that by forcing customers to walk through the whole store, they will pass more products and end up purchasing more. But is that really why the milk is in the back? Can you really have a business model intentionally built around inconveniencing your customers?

Read more
Parallels
5:14 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Common Ground Between Iraq's Rebels May Be Crumbling

People walk by a damaged police station in Mosul on July 15. The militants of the Islamic State are in control of the key city and have acted against former members of Saddam Hussein's regime who helped them drive out the Iraqi army last month.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Abu Wissam speaks to us by phone from the northern Iraqi city of Mosul. He asks us to use his nickname to protect him, his family and his missing father before he recounts his father's kidnapping.

The men came on evening of July 3, just before Abu Wissam's family was preparing to break their day-long fast during the holy month of Ramadan.

"There were seven of them and before I knew it they were in our kitchen," he says.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:52 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Federal Health Exchange Stays Busy After Open Enrollment Ends

Even after the open enrollment deadline, HealthCare.gov remained a popular destination.
J. David Ake AP

For months, journalists and politicians fixated on the number of people signing up for health insurance through the federal exchange created as part of the Affordable Care Act. It turned out that more than 5 million people signed up using HealthCare.gov by April 19.

But perhaps more surprising is that, according to federal data released Wednesday to ProPublica, there have been nearly 1 million transactions on the exchange since then. People are allowed to sign up and switch plans after certain life events, such as job changes, moves, the birth of a baby, marriages and divorces.

Read more
Music
4:29 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Finding The Anthropology In Latin Dance Music

Jorge Drexler's new album, Bailar en la Cueva, ventures into new territory for him: dance rhythms.
Thomas Canet Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Jorge Drexler's songs have been called introspective and literate. He's been compared to Paul Simon. But a couple years ago, the Uruguayan musician began to wonder what it would take to write dance-oriented music. That's the assignment he gave himself on his latest album, Bailar en la Cueva, or "dancing in the cave."

Read more
From Our Listeners
4:28 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Confusion With A Chance Of Clarity: Your Weather Questions, Answered

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Many listeners and readers felt a concise explanation of "a 20 percent chance of rain" was missing from this story about weather forecasts and probability, so we followed up with two meteorologists.

From meterologist Eli Jacks, of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service:

Read more
Goats and Soda
4:18 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

A Doctor Leading The Fight Against Ebola Has Caught The Virus

Dr. Sheik Umar Khan, 39, who has treated more than 100 Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, has now been infected with the deadly virus.
Umaru Fofana Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 9:52 am

In the past several months, Dr. Sheik Umar Khan has been a leader in the fight against the deadliest and largest Ebola outbreak in history.

Khan, 39, has treated over 100 Ebola patients in Sierra Leone. He's a "national hero," the country's health minister said Tuesday.

Read more
Middle East
4:16 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

'Tahrir Harassment' Trials End In Sexual Assault Convictions

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Sexual assault convictions have been handed down to some Egyptian men, after several women were attacked during celebrations for incoming President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. Audie Cornish speaks with freelance journalist Nadine Marroushi about the verdicts.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

Read more
Latin America
4:10 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Out Of The Amazon, Uncontacted Indians Face Diseases Of A New World

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Audie Cornish speaks with Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, who explains what happened to make this tribal people leave its village.

Read more
Middle East
4:08 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Kerry Claims Progress In Gaza Cease-Fire Talks

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more
Europe
4:08 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Costa Concordia's Rusty Hulk Embarks On A Final Voyage

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
Energy
4:08 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Nuclear Plant May Be In Hot Water Over Its Cooling System

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more
All Tech Considered
3:50 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Weekly Innovation: Get Moving, While Seated At Your Desk

Cubii is a Kickstarter project that allows users to exercise — elliptical style — while sitting at their desk at work.
Cubii

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 6:04 pm

This post is part of our Weekly Innovation series, in which we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:13 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

GM Recalls Nearly 718,000 Vehicles For 'Varying Safety Issues'

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:01 pm

Announcing six different safety recalls Wednesday, GM said it needs to fix problems that range from a turn-signal bug to an unpredictable loss of power steering. The flaws were found in vehicles from model years 2011 to 2015.

GM says no deaths and only two crashes have been linked to the recalls, which come in a year that has already seen the Detroit carmaker recall nearly 30 million vehicles worldwide. The company has "passed the 22 million vehicles recalled by all automakers last year," the AP says.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:12 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

'A Hard Day's Night': A Pop Artifact That Still Crackles With Energy

The Beatles perform one of their songs while filming A Hard Day's Night in 1964.
Evening Standard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 5:19 pm

Back in 1964, movie audiences were treated to three hit musicals. Two of them — Mary Poppins and My Fair Lady — won scads of Oscars. But it was the third that announced the future, and it did so from its opening chord.

What followed from that chord was what we call The Sixties.

Read more
Parallels
3:07 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Palestinian's Death Provokes Israeli Debate On Defining Terrorism

Hussein Abu Khdeir (left), father of slain Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir, holds a photo of his son as he meets with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank earlier this month. Israel has charged three Jewish Israelis with the killing and ruled that it was a terrorist attack. This has drawn criticism from some in Israel.
Mohamad Torokman AP

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:36 pm

Shortly before the Israel-Hamas fighting began in Gaza earlier this month, two separate killings ratcheted up tensions.

First, three Israeli teenagers were killed, allegedly by Hamas in the West Bank. Israel has arrested many Palestinians, but says it is still searching for the main suspects in the deaths of Naftali Frenkel, 16, Gilad Shaar, 16, and Eyal Yifrach, 19.

Read more

Pages