World

Middle East
5:09 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

'Africa Rising' A Theme Of Obama's Trip To The Continent

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

President Obama is returning home from a week-long trip through Africa, his first extended tour of the continent across three countries. The White House says the itinerary was designed to highlight African democracies and U.S. investment in health, business, and governance. Thoughts of former South African President Nelson Mandela, who is now gravely ill, were never far from mind.

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Middle East
5:09 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Syrian Rebel Commander: 'We Need A Lot Of Things'

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:12 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

We're into July and still no date has been set for a peace conference on Syria. The United States and Russia announced plans for that conference back in May. And Secretary of State John Kerry met with his Russian counterpart again today, agreeing that it should be held soon.

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Shots - Health News
5:09 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Curing Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis In Kids Takes Creativity

Rukshona Saidova, 12, lives with both HIV and tuberculosis. She can't walk right now because the diseases have atrophied muscles in her legs.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:07 pm

The world is struggling to cope with a growing epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Treatment is even more complicated for children.

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Your Money
5:09 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

As Mortgage Rates Rise, Homebuyers Face New Dilemma

Mortgage interest rates have spiked recently, causing unease among potential homebuyers.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:12 pm

A recent spike in mortgage rates has created a new predicament for potential homebuyers: Forge ahead and try to lock in now? Or hold off?

Dhruv Gupta was quoted a 3.5 percent rate in May while searching for a place to buy in the San Francisco area. Less than two months later, he's looking at 5.2 percent for the same loan. But this trend has not deterred Gupta.

"It's a fact of life," he says. "I mean I can't control them, so what do you do?"

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

In Swinging-'60s London, A Frisky 'Look Of Love'

The high life catches up with pop-culture impresario Paul Raymond (Steve Coogan, right) and his daughter Debbie (Imogen Poots) when nudie-mag editor Tony Power (Chris Addison) introduces them to drugs.
IFC

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:33 pm

The fourth collaboration between actor Steve Coogan and director Michael Winterbottom is much like their first: Both The Look of Love and 2002's 24 Hour Party People are antic, self-conscious film bios about impresarios on the fringes of showbiz — soft porn and punk rock, respectively. But somehow the new movie, though it doesn't skimp on the nudity, the cocaine or the Britpop, is the blander of the two.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

NASA Has Shut Down Space Telescope Orbiting Earth

"The Galaxy Next Door" — This composite image of the Andromeda galaxy was produced by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, showing Andromeda's ultraviolet side. NASA sent a decommission command to the space telescope Friday.
NASA

NASA is sending a reliable servant into a retirement that will end with a fiery re-entry into Earth's atmosphere in about 65 years. That's the fate that awaits the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the "galaxy hunter" space telescope whose original 29-month mission was extended to more than 10 years.

Along the way, the orbiting system, known as GALEX, helped scientists study how galaxies and stars are born, and how they change over time.

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World Cafe
3:34 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Christopher Owens On World Cafe

Christopher Owens.
Ryan McGinley Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:12 am

Formerly of the San Francisco rock band Girls, Christopher Owens now explores music and life on his own. Shortly after the duo released its second album, Father, Son, Holy Ghost, Owens announced that he was leaving to go solo. Released this past January, Lysandre is his first album recorded under his own name; it's a coming-of-age story for the singer, intertwined with hints of romance.

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Off The Rails: Strike-Hit Bay Area Struggles With 'Horrible' Commutes

Frustrated commuters wait at the Transbay Temporary Terminal in San Francisco to catch a bus over to Oakland on Tuesday.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:44 pm

Andrea Brearley's kids really want to see Pixar while on vacation. The problem is that the family is staying in San Francisco, and with rail workers on strike, they're having a hard time figuring out how to get to the cartoon-maker's headquarters across the bay in Emeryville, Calif.

Brearley, who lives in Windsor, Ontario, says it's been "scary" trying to figure out an alternative route. "Three different people told me three different buses," she says.

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The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Felony Arrest Of Student Who Bought Water Riles Many In Virginia

A college student spent the night in jail and was charged with felony counts after agents approached her car, suspecting she bought beer at this Harris Teeter grocery store in Charlottesville, Va.
Google

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 11:27 pm

"We're the police."

"This is bottled water."

If an encounter between several young women and Virginia's Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control agents had gone that smoothly, the participants might be looking back on a chance encounter as merely odd, perhaps even funny. Instead, they're coping with the aftermath of a brief flight from authorities that resulted in spending a night in jail and felony charges, now dropped, of hitting agents with a car. The state agency says it's reviewing the case.

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NPR Ombudsman
3:19 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Open Forum

istockphoto.com

You're invited to use this space to discuss media, policy and NPR's journalism. We'll follow the conversation and share it with the newsroom.

Please stay within the community discussion rules, among them:

  • If you can't be polite, don't say it: ...please try to disagree without being disagreeable. Focus your remarks on positions, not personalities.

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Parallels
2:15 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Who's Who In The Egyptian Crisis

Before The Fall: Then-Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi (right) met Monday with Prime Minister Hesham Kandil (center) and Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi in Cairo. Since then, the military has ousted Morsi, suspended the constitution and imposed a "road map" for political transition in Egypt after the president refused calls to step down.
Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:46 pm

This story, which was originally posted on July 2, has been updated to reflect the events in Egypt today.

After days of growing protests across Egypt, the military has removed embattled President Mohammed Morsi and suspended the country's constitution, paving the way for an interim government ahead of early presidential elections.

Two years ago, during Egypt's 2011 revolution, the storyline was simple. A broad cross section of Egyptians took to the streets to demand the removal of Hosni Mubarak, the president who had been in power for three decades.

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The Salt
1:56 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

'Heart Attack On A Hook': Meet America's 'Worst Restaurant Meal'

Long John Silver's Big Catch platter will net you 33 grams of trans fats in one meal.
Courtesy of Clare Politano Center for Science in the Public Interest

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:19 pm

Seafood is generally considered a more healthful choice when dining out — but not if you're battering and deep-frying it and serving it up with hush puppies and onion rings.

And that is precisely why the folks at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nutrition and health policy watchdog group, have named Long John Silver's new "Big Catch" meal the worst restaurant meal in America.

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The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

His Son Is 'A Modern Day Paul Revere,' Snowden's Father Says

Declaring that "you are a modern day Paul Revere; summoning the American people to confront the growing danger of tyranny and one-branch government," the father of "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden on Tuesday released an open letter to his son.

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Krulwich Wonders...
1:02 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Democracy, My Mother And Toast

Robert Krulwich NPR

When they proposed it in the 1770s, it was such a novel idea. That instead of a king anointed by God, instead of a sage, instead of one leader telling all of us what to do, we should, every four years, all of us, pick our own leader, who would serve for a season, and then, job done, gently depart.

Nothing like this had been tried for thousands of years. Somehow, together we would be wiser than a single king. We would lead ourselves.

In principle, democracy seems noble, beautiful even.

At my family dinner table, I wondered a little. More than a little.

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Baikonour, We Have A Problem. Russian Rocket Crashes And Burns

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 3:38 pm

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Why The Fort Hood Suspect Couldn't Plead Guilty To Murder

Maj. Nidal Hasan faces 13 charges of murder and 32 of attempted murder for the November 2009 shootings at Fort Hood. A Muslim, he has refused a judge's order to shave his beard, though it violates Army regulations. The trial will proceed, however.
Bell County Sheriff's Office Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 2:07 pm

(Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET.)

Nearly four years after the mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas, in which 13 people were killed and 32 were wounded, the case against the Army psychiatrist who stands accused of the crimes got to the pleading stage Tuesday.

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Afghanistan
12:28 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Afghan Woman Fights For Women's Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to bring you the story of one young woman for whom going to school was literally an act of courage. Shabana Basij-Rasikh was six when the Taliban took over in Afghanistan. They made it illegal for girls to go to school. As a result, for years, Shabana and her sister put their lives on the line to go to a secret school in Kabul. Her persistence and bravery eventually led her to Middlebury College, where she graduated magna cum laude in 2010.

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Parallels
11:59 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Nelson Mandela's Prison Adventures

Near the end of his 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was taken to secret meetings with government officials and for drives around Cape Town. Here, he returned to his Robben Island prison cell for a visit in 1994, shortly before he became South Africa's first black president.
Louise Gubb Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 7:15 pm

On Christmas Eve 1986, a South Africa prison commander responsible for watching over Nelson Mandela casually asked the world's most famous prisoner, "Mandela, would you like to see the city?"

Mandela was completely surprised, but agreed. The prison commander, Lt. Col. Gawie Marx, promptly put Mandela in his car for a leisurely drive around Cape Town, one of the world's most scenic cities.

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Monkey See
11:32 am
Tue July 2, 2013

'Big Brother' Isn't Just A Terrible Show, It's A Wasted Opportunity

Houseguest Judd makes a toast during the season premiere of Big Brother.
Cliff Lipson CBS

Here's how Big Brother works.

Producers throw a bunch of people into a house, where they're stuck for about three months. All day and all night, they're watched by cameras, and they can be watched online — these are the so-called "live feeds," which are sort of like watching the security cameras in the most boring juice bar in Los Angeles. (I wrote about touring the house in 2010; it's very creepy.)

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NPR Story
11:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

St. Louis’ Famous Dish: Toasted Ravioli

Toasted ravioli at Villa Farotto in St. Louis, Missouri. (Jeremy Hobson/Here & Now)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

New York is famous for its hotdogs. Chicago has its deep dish pizza. And St. Louis is known for its toasted ravioli — ravioli that’s covered in breadcrumbs and deep fried.

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson visits Villa Farotto to taste the regional dish.

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