World

Parallels
3:19 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Afghan Air Force Races To Prepare For Solo Mission

Afghan trainer Col. Din Mohammad, standing in front of a Soviet-made helicopter, speaks to new group of Afghan pilots and air crews at the Air Force University in Kabul on Jan. 16, 2012. The Afghan air force has only a small number of planes, pilots and spare parts and is attempting to ramp up training before the departure of U.S. and NATO forces.
Musadeq Sadeq AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 5:11 am

A gray C-130 Hercules flies low over the runway at Kabul airport. The four-engine cargo plane then climbs and banks to the left. Moments later, it lands and passes under the spray of two fire trucks before stopping in front of a crowd of officials.

This ceremony last month marked the official transfer of the first two C-130s from the U.S. to the Afghan air force.

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The Salt
5:16 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Chef Chat: We Pick The Brains Of Ottolenghi And Tamimi

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi grab a quick breakfast with NPR's Madhulika Sikka. They stopped by NPR in October to talk food philosophy.
Morgan Walker/ NPR

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi own four wildly popular London restaurants and have authored runaway best-selling cookbooks for omnivores and vegetarians alike.

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Middle East
4:52 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Kerry's New Mission: Convince Congress To Take Iran Deal

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:56 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry is back in Washington to defend the proposed nuclear deal with Iran to skeptical members of Congress. He and his colleagues from other major powers failed to reach a deal with Iran during talks over the weekend in Geneva. Iran blames France's hard line for blowing up the deal, though Kerry has tried to downplay that.

Asia
4:52 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

In Storm-Ravaged Philippines, Corruption Undermines Infrastructure

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:56 pm

Some of the destruction from Typhoon Haiyan was not purely the result of the storm's huge force. Among the leading Asian economies, the Philippines regularly ranks as the most corrupt. Robert Siegel talks with Steven Rood, who runs the Asia Foundation's office in Manila, about how the nation's infrastructure problems, laid bare by the storm, relate to graft and corruption.

Asia
4:52 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Chinese Communist Party Meeting Promises Big, Yet Vague, Changes

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:56 pm

China's Communist Party wrapped up a four-day meeting Tuesday that could herald big changes for the nation's economy. The meeting carries the soporific title The Third Plenary of the 18th Central Committee. But historically, a third plenary has meant transformational reforms.

Asia
4:52 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:56 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Richard Brennan, World Health Organization director of emergency risk management and humanitarian response, about the geographic challenges of sending humanitarian aid to Typhoon Haiyan victims.

Asia
4:52 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

At Tacloban Airport, Aid Workers Arrive As Residents Try To Leave

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:56 pm

The town of Tacloban on the island of Leyte in the Philippines was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. The scene at the airport there was chaotic as the Philippine and U.S. military delivered food and aid workers and residents rushed to board planes headed back to less-damaged Manila .

Parallels
4:52 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Ukraine, A Chocolate Factory And The Fate Of A Woman

Individually wrapped chocolate-covered hazelnut sweets move along a conveyor belt on the production line at the Roshen Confectionary Corp. factory in Kiev, Ukraine. A Russian ban on Ukraine's chocolate comes at a time when the nation is considering aligning itself with the European Union.
Joseph Sywenkyj Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:41 pm

It's been more than two decades since the former Soviet Union broke apart, and to the dismay of Russia, many of the 15 former Soviet republics have spun away from Moscow's orbit.

Now Ukraine — with 46 million people — has a chance to say goodbye to its Soviet past and align itself both economically and culturally with the European Union.

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The Two-Way
4:51 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

World Anti-Doping Leader: Armstrong Needs 'Miracle' To Return

The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency calls Lance Armstrong's lifetime ban "done and dusted." Armstrong is seen here riding in an event in Iowa this year.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Sports officials from cycling's governing body and the World Anti-Doping Agency will meet this week to discuss an in-depth review of doping among cyclists. But WADA's chief says that one topic that's not likely to be reviewed is Lance Armstrong's lifetime ban, which he calls "done and dusted."

WADA president John Fahey made that comment Tuesday in South Africa, where officials are meeting for the World Conference on Doping in Sport.

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The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Nigerian Pirates Free Kidnapped U.S. Mariners

Fighters with the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), pictured in 2008. The rebel group claimed responsibility for the kidnapping.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Two U.S. crewmembers seized last month from a ship off the coast of Nigeria have been released by their pirate captors, the State Department said Tuesday.

The captain and engineer from the U.S.-flagged C-Retriever, a 222-foot offshore resupply, were abducted on Oct. 23 when gunman boarded the vessel.

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The Two-Way
2:54 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

China's Leaders Unveil Economic Reforms

Plainclothes policemen guard in front of Tiananmen Gate outside the Great Hall of the People where the Communist Party's 205-member Central Committee gathered for its third annual plenum on Tuesday.
Feng Li Getty Images

China's leaders have laid out a plan to wrest a bigger chunk of the country's economy from state control and turn it over to the free market in hopes of stimulating growth and curb corruption.

At the end of the four-day Third Plenum meeting, Communist Party leaders said that state ownership would continue to play a key role in the economy, but endorsed more private ownership.

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Parallels
2:22 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

Young students in a Bridge International Academy school in Nairobi, in September. On the surface, there's little to distinguish these schools from others in the developing world. But Bridge's model relies on teachers reading lessons from tablets.
Frederic Courbet for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 1:54 pm

Bridge International Academies has set up more than 200 schools in Kenya over the past four years, and plans to open 50 more in January.

Using a school-in-a-box model, Bridge's founders say it gives primary schoolkids a quality education for roughly $5 a month.

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The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Women Fare Worse In Egypt Than In Any Arab State: Survey

A new survey of gender experts finds that in the Arab world, Egyptian women face the worst treatment. Here, women attend a political march to the presidential palace in Cairo in February.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:35 pm

Citing high rates of sexual harassment and female genital mutilation, a new survey finds that women in Egypt face the worst treatment in any Arab country. Other countries with high levels of unrest — Iraq and Syria — are also among the worst for women, along with Saudi Arabia, according to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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Parallels
1:50 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Can The Philippines Save Itself From Typhoons?

The sun sets behind a house damaged by Typhoon Haiyan outside the hard-hit city of Tacloban. The Philippines has gotten better at preparing for typhoons, but remains extremely vulnerable.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:05 pm

For the third year in a row, the Philippines has been hit by a major storm claiming more than 1,000 lives, and the death toll from Haiyan, one of the worst on record, could climb to 10,000.

With thousands of islands in the warm waters of the Pacific, the Philippines is destined to face the wrath of angry tropical storms year after year.

So what can a poor, densely populated country do to mitigate the huge loss of life and the massive destruction?

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The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

After Typhoon Tore Through, People 'Were Left On Their Own'

In Guiuan, the Philippines, the typhoon left behind destruction and left people fending for themselves in the first days after.
John Alvin Villafranca Courtesy of David Santos and the photographer

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:56 pm

  • David Santos on saying prayers as the typhoon raged.
  • David Santos on realizing how widespread the destruction was.

The concrete floors and walls shook, the door of the room almost blew off its hinges and he "said a lot prayers," Filipino TV reporter David Santos says as he remembers what it was like to ride out Typhoon Haiyan inside a small hospital in the Philippines town of Guiuan.

Then, when he and other survivors emerged on Friday, the scene was incredible.

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World
11:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Reparations May Not Mean What You Think It Means

Fifteen countries in the Caribbean are seeking reparations from their former colonial masters for the lasting harm slavery has had on their countries. Host Michel Martin talks about the effort with Jermaine McCalpin from the University of West Indies in Jamaica.

World
11:25 am
Tue November 12, 2013

In Dominican Republic, An Emotional Fight Over Citizenship

Thousands of people in the Dominican Republic are being stripped of their citizenship by that country. Host Michel Martin talks to Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles about why Dominicans of Haitian ancestry are denouncing the decision.

The Two-Way
9:58 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Clash Between Garment Workers, Police In Cambodia Turns Deadly

An injured Cambodian worker escapes from riot police in the compound of a Buddhist pagoda in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, on Tuesday. Police fired live ammunition at protesting garment workers outside the capital, injuring at least 20 people and killing a bystander.
AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:17 am

Protesting garment workers and riot police clashed Tuesday in Cambodia's capital city, leaving a bystander dead and at least 20 people injured.

Workers from SL Garment Processing (Cambodia) Ltd. Factory were marching toward Prime Minister Hun Sen's residence in Phnom Penh. Workers from the factory have been protesting for months, demanding better pay and working conditions. The factory makes clothes for H&M, Gap and other Western brands.

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Parallels
8:40 am
Tue November 12, 2013

World Headlines: The Financial Cost Of Typhoon Haiyan

Philippines, Philippines Daily Inquirer

The devastation from Typhoon Haiyan could cost the Philippines economy $14 billion, according to one estimate.

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Asia
8:14 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Tacloban Took Brunt Of Typhoon Haiyen

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:15 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We have two perspectives now on the destruction a typhoon left behind in the Philippines. The first is the view from the air. It comes from U.S. Marine Brigadier General Paul Kennedy, who is coordinating an American military effort to help typhoon survivors. Not long ago, General Kennedy stepped on board a helicopter for what he called reconnaissance. He flew over a wide strip of land struck by one of the strongest storms on record.

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