World

World Cafe
1:45 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Laura Mvula On World Cafe

Laura Mvula.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:15 pm

U.K. singer Laura Mvula has been well-served by her conservatory training, which helped her uncover her own unique sound: Mvula's first full-length album, Sing to the Moon, blends classic pop, jazz and soul.

With help from producer Steve Brown, Mvula's choral-like arrangements are wonderfully layered and complex. In this installment of World Cafe, the singer performs live with her band and talks to host David Dye about how she separates her roles as a songwriter and a performer.

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Parallels
12:50 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Angry Chinese Workers Resort To Direct Action

American Chip Starnes, co-owner of Specialty Medical Supplies, waves Monday from a window where he is being held by angry workers inside his plant at the Jinyurui Science and Technology Park on the outskirts of Beijing. He remained confined to the plant on Wednesday.
Andy Wong AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 1:31 pm

When Chinese workers have a grievance, they are increasingly taking dramatic and direct action.

As we've reported, an American executive at a Chinese factory has been prevented by workers from leaving the plant since Friday. Chip Starnes of Specialty Medical Supplies says it's a misunderstanding following a decision to shut down part of his medical-supply business and move some jobs to India where wages are lower.

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Parallels
12:45 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

The U.S. Wants Mr. Snowden. Why Won't The World Cooperate?

Journalists show passengers arriving at Russia's Sheremetyevo airport on Sunday an image of Edward Snowden.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 8:53 pm

China appeared perfectly happy to let Edward Snowden slip away despite a U.S. request for his arrest. Russia appears to enjoy thumbing its nose at Washington as Snowden cools his heels at a Moscow airport. Ecuador is toying with the notion of granting him asylum.

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Shots - Health News
12:28 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Laughing Gas Gets A Safety Check

Is nitrous oxide during surgery safe?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 9:32 am

To anesthesiologists, laughing gas is no joke.

Nitrous oxide was one of the first chemicals used to make surgery and tooth-pulling painless. Back in the 1840s, Horace Wells, a dentist in Hartford, Conn., did his best to popularize it as an anesthetic agent. Despite some failed demonstrations early on, use of the gas during surgery eventually became routine.

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The Protojournalist
12:04 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Weird Public Library Stuff: Check It Out

Olivia, a 5-year-old Angolan colobus monkey, at the Brookfield Zoo near Chicago.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Sure, at certain public libraries around the country you can check out ebooks and audiobooks and DVDs and iPads and Nooks and Kindles. Paintings to hang on your walls at home? Yep. Bridal magazines? Yep, those too. You can also check out a bunch of strange stuff, including:

1) A fishing pole from the Erie County Public Library in Erie, Pa.

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The Two-Way
9:07 am
Wed June 26, 2013

WATCH: Teary Paula Deen Says She's No Racist

Celebrity chef Paula Deen poses for a portrait in 2012, in New York. In her deposition for a lawsuit by a former employee, Deen admits to having used racial slurs, among other things.
Carlo Allegri AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:18 am

Paula Deen, the Food Network star under fire over a racially charged deposition, says she is no racist.

Deen, who has been dropped by the Food Network and as spokeswoman for Smithfield Foods, gave a teary interview to the Today show this morning.

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The Salt
9:03 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Fruity With A Hint Of Bologna: A Slacker's Guide To Wine Tasting

Swigging for science: A hint of oak, our wine tasting newbies learned, is more common in reds than whites. It's a marker for expense in both.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 9:29 pm

Wine tasting has taken it on the chin recently.

"There are no two ways about it: the bullsh*t is strong with wine."

That's what Robert T. Gonzales recently wrote on io9.com in a post that eviscerated wine tasting as a form of skilled craft. "Wine tasting. Wine rating. Wine reviews. Wine descriptions," he writes. "They're all related. And they're all egregious offenders, from a [expletive deleted] standpoint."

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:33 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Laws Of Man And Laws Of Nature

The Sundarbans, a mangrove forest at the edge of the Bay of Bengal, stretch across parts of southwestern Bangladesh and southeastern India.
NASA

We humans are an unruly bunch. So much so that we need laws to keep order, to make sure we stay on track. Without our laws, society would quickly descend into chaos. The laws of man are guarantors of order, a necessary control against the inherent greediness of our species.

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The Two-Way
8:15 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Book News: Turkish Protesters Form 'Taksim Square Book Club'

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:42 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Prime Minister Julia Gilliard Ousted By Kevin Rudd

Prime Minister Julia Gillard during question time at Parliament House on Wednesday in Canberra, Australia.
Stefan Postles Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 12:40 pm

In a move designed to salvage upcoming elections, Australia's Labor Party ousted Prime Minister Julia Gillard in favor of Kevin Rudd.

Reuters explains the politics:

"Rudd, a former diplomat who speaks Mandarin, won a Labor Party ballot with 57 votes to Gillard's 45. Gillard promised to quit politics if she lost the ballot.

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Europe
7:20 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Hawk Returns To Wimbledon To Scare Away Pigeons

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Wimbledon is underway, which means the tennis world's most famous hawk is back in the spotlight. No, not the Hawk-Eye ball tracking technology linesmen use to help make calls, an actual hawk. His name is Rufus, and his job is to scare pesky pigeons away from the All England Club before the crowds of tennis fans arrive. Rufus also worked the 2012 Olympics. The hawk, of course, has his own Twitter account to squawk at his admirers. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

National Security
7:03 am
Wed June 26, 2013

NSA Leaker Case Causes Riff Between U.S. And Russia

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 1:40 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Edward Snowden may have intended to stir things up about secret American surveillance programs. It turns out, he's also shaking up diplomatic relations between the U.S. and three countries where those relations are already edgy. The former intelligence contractor who leaked classified documents is believed to be still at a Moscow airport.

He arrived there from Hong Kong on Sunday. NPR's State Department Correspondent Michele Kelemen joins us to talk about the countries drawn into Snowden's travels. Good morning.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed June 26, 2013

'The Hare' Leads A Merry Chase

iStockphoto.com

To love the novels of Cesar Aira you must have a taste for the absurd, a tolerance for the obscurely philosophical and a willingness to laugh out loud against your better judgment. His latest novel to be translated into English, The Hare, is set in the Argentine pampas at the end of the 19th century. But don't let any veneer of realism fool you.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Supreme Court Expected To Issue Historic Rulings On Gay Marriage

Gay rights activist Vin Testa of DC waves a flag outside the U.S. Supreme Court building on Tuesday in Washington, DC.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 12:38 pm

Update at 10:45 A.M. ET:

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The Two-Way
6:19 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Archbishop Prays For 'Peaceful, Perfect End' For Nelson Mandela

A well-wisher walks in front of a wall in Pretoria covered with messages for ailing former South African President Nelson Mandela on Wednesday.
Marco Longari AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 12:26 pm

Nelson Mandela remains in a South African hospital in critical condition.

South African Archbishop Thabo Makgoba visited the hospital to pray with his family on Tuesday. On his Facebook page, Makgoba posted the prayer he said for the 94-year-old anti-apartheid legend and former president. He wrote:

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Europe
6:06 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Russian Official Encourages 'Food Patriotism'

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene with health advice from Russia.

Gennady Onishchenko, the country's chief sanitary inspector, is encouraging food patriotism. Translation: More borscht - cut the meals at McDonald's. The fast food chain is popular in many Russian cities. But Mr. Onishchenko had more to say. To beat the summer heat, he said people should just get to work early, rather than wear, quote, "spotted little pants that stop above the knees." We think he's referring to shorts.

Africa
5:40 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Obama's Africa Trip To Focus On Democracy, Investment

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

President Obama flew home from Europe less than a week ago, and this morning, he is headed back overseas. This time, Air Force One is bound for Africa. It's a weeklong journey that will take the president and his family to three countries covering vastly different regions. This is Obama's first extended trip to the continent as president.

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Middle East
5:31 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Jordan Accused Of Targeting Online Dissent

A Jordanian woman surfs the Web at an office in the Amman, Jordan, on Sept. 30, 2009. The country's government is under fire from media activists for blocking hundreds of websites across the kingdom.
Ali Jareki Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:43 pm

Jordan's King Abdullah vowed to make the desert kingdom a "free Internet" country as he began his rule more than a decade ago. On June 2, when local Internet providers were ordered to block hundreds of news websites across the kingdom, Web publishers protested the broken promise and international media watchdog organizations charged censorship.

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Business
5:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And that brings us to today's last word in business - which is: Courtesy Seating.

Jessie Frank was a distraught mom who was going to be late picking up her daughter at camp.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

She was on stand-by in Washington, D.C. for an over-booked Delta Flight to New York, when a man offered up his seat. Turns out it was Delta CEO Richard Anderson. His kindness helped the mom and earned some good PR for the company.

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