World

Asia
5:07 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

UN Report Puts Afghan Opium Poppy Cultivation At Record High

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 8:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The poppy crop in Afghanistan has hit record levels, a sign that the drug trade there continues to rise. That's according to the latest numbers from a United Nations report out today. The U.S. warns that a boost in opium production will provide more money for Taliban insurgents.

As NPR's Tom Bowman reports, those rising numbers come despite billions of dollars spent to eradicate the poppy plant.

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Asia
5:07 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

The Challenges And Limitations Of Disaster Donations

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 8:01 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The UN, as well as private charitable groups, are deploying an army of humanitarian aid workers to the areas hardest hit by the typhoon and the need is massive. Agencies say they will need millions to rebuild. Many of us want to know, how can I help? Should I send money, clothes and to whom? Will it reach the people who need it the most?

We're joined now by Bob Ottenhoff of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy to offer some practical guidance. Hi there, Bob. Welcome to the studio.

ROBERT OTTENHOFF: Hi. Thanks for having me.

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Asia
5:07 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Typhoon Victims Struggle To Survive As Aid Is Slow To Arrive

Soldiers hold back people who are waiting to board a military aircraft in Tacloban. While the government, international aid groups and foreign militaries have rushed to the affected area, they are having trouble getting to the victims because of blocked roads, the U.S. commander on the scene told NPR early Wednesday.
Edgar Su Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 11:10 pm

Despair and criticisms are mounting in the Philippines as the delays stretch on and residents along the country's eastern seaboard struggle to survive without food or clean water.

According to one local government estimate, just 1 in 5 victims of Typhoon Haiyan has received any assistance.

On Wednesday, the U.S. military expanded its assistance to around-the-clock operations. U.S. Marine Osprey planes joined the procession of mostly military aircraft delivering aid workers and supplies to the devastated city of Tacloban.

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The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Police: British Spy's Strange Death Was 'Probably An Accident'

Scotland Yard says it believes a British spy whose naked, decomposing body was found padlocked inside a gym bag in a bathtub three years ago, probably died accidentally.

Gareth Williams, 31, was working for Britain's MI6 spy agency when his body was found at his home in August 2010.

Last May, a coroner concluded that Williams was probably murdered, but on Wednesday London Police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Martin Hewitt told reporters that the death was "most probably ... an accident."

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All Tech Considered
3:36 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Flooded And Powerless: When Lights And Cellphones Go Dark

Typhoon survivors line up Wednesday to charge their mobile phones using power outlets provided by a cellular service provider in Tacloban, Philippines.
Dita Alangkara AP

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 10:35 am

Updated Nov. 14 at 10:30 a.m. ET.

It's hard to imagine what would happen when, in the wake of destruction, lights go dark and cellphones become useless. For many inhabitants of the Philippines this past week, that was reality.

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The Salt
3:13 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Could Hunger Make Us More Charitable?

Researchers have a hunch that because we often had to share food to survive, we're inclined to be more interested in giving when we're hungry.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 4:44 pm

Hunger can make people emotional, that's for sure. Some people get "hangry" when their blood sugar levels drop and their irritability rises. Others get greedy.

But new research suggests that we may have another, innate response to hunger: a desire to encourage others to share what they have.

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Author Interviews
1:27 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Christmas Lights Make Slippers In Global 'Junkyard' Economy

A woman worker sorts used plastic bottles at a recycle center in Mumbai, India.
Rajanish Kakade AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 7:01 pm

When you think of recycling, you probably think of cans, plastic bottles and newspapers. Well, think a little bigger.

There are businesses devoted to recycling metal, paper, plastic, oil, textiles, cell phones, computers, motors, batteries, Christmas lights, cars and more. The hidden world of globalized recycling and reclamation, and its impact on the environment and the global economy, is the subject of the new book Junkyard Planet by journalist Adam Minter.

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Parallels
1:24 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

By The Numbers: A Typhoon's Devastation

Residents collect gasoline at a damaged gas station in Tacloban, Philippines, on Wednesday.
Lui Siu Wai Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 6:06 pm

Typhoon Haiyan made landfall in the Philippines on Friday, packing winds of close to 200 mph. Haiyan, known as Yolanda in the Philippines, devastated the city of Tacloban and the surrounding areas. At the time of impact, it was being called the "strongest tropical cyclone on record."

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The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Toronto Council Asks Mayor Ford To Temporarily Step Aside

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford during Wednesday's contentious City Council meeting.
Mark Blinch Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 4:10 pm

Toronto's City Council voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to call on Mayor Rob Ford to take a leave of absence after he admitted to purchasing and using illegal drugs.

In a final plea before the vote, Ford apologized to Council members, acknowledging that "I really 'effed up.' "

The vote came after a tumultuous afternoon chronicled in our original post, which we pick up here:

-- Mayor Rob Ford has admitted to purchasing illegal drugs in recent years, while also insisting that, "I am not an alcoholic ... I am not a drug addict."

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Parallels
12:05 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Despite Western Efforts, Afghan Opium Crop Hits Record High

Afghan farmers collect raw opium earlier this year in a poppy field in the Khogyani district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul. Afghanistan's opium production surged in 2013 to record levels, despite 12 years of international efforts to wean the country off the narcotics trade, according to a U.N. report released Wednesday.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 12:20 pm

The amount of land under opium poppy cultivation in Afghanistan is at a record high, the United Nations said in a report released Wednesday.

Opium production in 2013, meanwhile, rose 49 percent over 2012, according to the 2013 Afghanistan Opium Survey. The country is the world's No. 1 poppy producer.

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Books
11:55 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Aid Worker: Hard To Put Experience Into Words

As an aid worker, Jessica Alexander worked in Rwanda, Sudan, Sierra Leone, and Haiti, but don't call her a hero or a saint. Alexander tells Michel Martin about why she wanted to challenge perceptions of aid workers in her new book, Chasing Chaos: My Decade In and Out of Humanitarian Aid.

World
11:55 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan: Families Struggle To Connect Amid Devastation

Wrecked infrastructure is making it hard for Filipino Americans to find out the status of family members affected by Typhoon Haiyan. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jessica Petilla, a Filipino doctor in New York who has immediate family in the hard hit province of Leyte.

Parallels
10:31 am
Wed November 13, 2013

The Emperor's Code: Breach Of Protocol Spurs Debate In Japan

Actor turned lawmaker Taro Yamamoto (second left) hands a letter to Japan's Emperor Akihito, as Empress Michiko and chief steward Yutaka Kawashima (top center) look on during the autumn garden party at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo on Oct. 31.
Koji Sasahara AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 5:23 pm

A staid and unremarkable royal garden party suddenly became the stuff of front-page scandal, when rookie lawmaker and passionate anti-nuclear activist Taro Yamamoto slipped a handwritten letter to Emperor Akihito. The mystified monarch hurriedly passed the epistle to an aide, unread — but the damage was done.

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Parallels
9:00 am
Wed November 13, 2013

World Headlines: Israel Settlement Plans Threaten Peace Talks

Billboards advertise apartments as construction takes place in the Har Homa section of Jerusalem. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has intervened after his housing minister announced plans for some 20,000 additional housing units in another sensitive area, known as E1, just east of Jerusalem in the West Bank.
Jim Hollander EPA /LANDOV

Israel, Haaretz

The latest round of Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations have come under threat after Israel's housing minister said his office would start long-term planning to build more than 20,000 homes in a particularly sensitive area near Jerusalem.

The move by Housing Minister Uri Ariel immediately drew fierce criticism from the Palestinians, with President Mahmoud Abbas threatening to call off the talks with Israel that began in the summer.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Wed November 13, 2013

In Shattered Philippine City, A Fight For 'Sheer Survival'

In anguish: Tears ran down the cheeks of a man as he waited with other survivors Tuesday for a flight out of Tacloban in the Philippines, which was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 8:44 pm

  • Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Tacloban, the Philippines
  • From the NPR Newscast: Anthony Kuhn on the scene in Tacloban

(We updated this post at 10:40 a.m. ET to include the latest official death toll of more than 2,300.)

As some trucks loaded with food and other aid arrive in the Philippine city of Tacloban, they're being looted by residents struggling to survive in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, NPR's Anthony Kuhn said Wednesday on Morning Edition.

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Asia
5:11 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Typhoon Relief Supplies Badly Needed In Tacloban

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 6:50 am

Relief workers are trying to get more food, water and medicine to survivors of Friday's typhoon in the central Philippines. Two more airports have opened in the region and the U.S. military is installing equipment so that relief flights can land at night. Tacloban was the worst hit city.

NPR Story
5:08 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Chain Of Low-Cost Schools Open In Kenya

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 1:56 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In the developing world, millions of children are either not in school or attending classes where learning to read or write is far from guaranteed. Recently, several for-profit companies have started opening low-cost private schools in Africa aimed at families living on less than $2 a day.

NPR's Jason Beaubien looks at the largest, a new chain of low cost schools in Kenya.

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NPR Story
5:08 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Cricket Star Sachin Tendulkar To Retire At 40

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 6:44 am

Sachin Tendulkar, arguably the greatest modern cricket star, prepares to play the last match of his career in India on Thursday. Commentator Sandip Roy explains why Tendulkar matters so much to the sport.

Parallels
3:19 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Afghan Air Force Races To Prepare For Solo Mission

Afghan trainer Col. Din Mohammad, standing in front of a Soviet-made helicopter, speaks to new group of Afghan pilots and air crews at the Air Force University in Kabul on Jan. 16, 2012. The Afghan air force has only a small number of planes, pilots and spare parts and is attempting to ramp up training before the departure of U.S. and NATO forces.
Musadeq Sadeq AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 5:11 am

A gray C-130 Hercules flies low over the runway at Kabul airport. The four-engine cargo plane then climbs and banks to the left. Moments later, it lands and passes under the spray of two fire trucks before stopping in front of a crowd of officials.

This ceremony last month marked the official transfer of the first two C-130s from the U.S. to the Afghan air force.

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The Salt
5:16 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Chef Chat: We Pick The Brains Of Ottolenghi And Tamimi

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi grab a quick breakfast with NPR's Madhulika Sikka. They stopped by NPR in October to talk food philosophy.
Morgan Walker/ NPR

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi own four wildly popular London restaurants and have authored runaway best-selling cookbooks for omnivores and vegetarians alike.

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