World

Sunday Puzzle
8:21 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Can You Pass This -TE ST-?

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is an insider's test. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the consecutive letters T-E-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end with -TE and the second word will start ST-. For example, given "sheer force," you would say "brute strength."

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Politics
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

How To Be A 'Super Forecaster'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Experts and pundits' predictions of the future aren't particularly accurate, according to University of Pennsylvania professor Philip Tetlock. He tells host Rachel Martin that making accurate predictions might be a trainable skill.

Asia
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Cyclone Ravages India's East Coast

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

A massive evacuation effort appears to have saved many lives, but Cylcone Phailin flooded villages and destroyed homes. Financial Times South Asia bureau chief Victor Mallet speaks with host Rachel Martin about the extent of the damage.

Afghanistan
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Kerry, Afghans Reach Deal On Troop Withdrawal

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

In marathon talks in Kabul, Secretary of State John Kerry persuaded the reluctant Afghan president to agree to a deal on the planned withdrawal of American troops next year. While some questions about the agreement remain unresolved, it marks a diplomatic victory for Kerry. Now it is up to Karzai to sell it to his people.

Africa
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Why Libyan Prime Minister Was Kidnapped, Then Freed

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Ali Zeidan was abducted and then released last week after the U.S. raided Tripoli to capture a senior al-Qaida suspect. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with professor Dirk Vandewalle, author of A History of Modern Libya, about Zeidan's many opponents and the role of militias in Libya.

NPR Story
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

The Blurry Tone Of 'Double Exposure'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Kelley Stoltz has been called the godfather of the hazy, washed out, poppy sound coming from the Bay Area. Host Rachel Martin talks with musician Kelley Stoltz about his new album, Double Exposure.

Sports
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Worst NFL Team Takes On The Best

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

The dismal Jacksonville Jaguars play the formidable Denver Broncos today, a match-up that makes for the biggest point spread ever and possibly the worst regular season NFL game in a long time. NPR's Mike Pesca joins host Rachel Martin and can talk of nothing else.

Music Interviews
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Scary Meets Catchy In Darkside's 'Psychic'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The band Darkside is made up of two men - two halves really. Dark, scary electronics and a funk, rhythmic guitar line. The electronic half is Nicholas Jaar. He got noticed as a laptop music prodigy when he was a student at Brown University. And up until a year or two ago, he mostly worked alone. Then, the other part of Darkside entered the picture - Dave Harrington, a composer and jazz bassist. Now, they've got this first album out together. It's called "Psychic." Nicholas Jaar explains why he chose a bass player as his guitarist.

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Author Interviews
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Turow Explores Mystical Connections In 'Identical'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Scott Turow says some recent research in a case with DNA evidence inspired the plot of his new thriller, Identical. He tells host Rachel Martin about his interest in twins.

Health Care
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Prices On Health Exchanges Vary By State

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The widely varied success of the rollout of the health care exchanges, as part of the Affordable Care Act, highlighted the fact that even though the health care law is a national one, you're likely to experience it differently state to state.

Larry Levitt is a senior vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation. He's with us to help us sort through a few different scenarios. Welcome to the program, Larry.

LARRY LEVITT: Oh, thanks. It's a pleasure to be here.

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Politics
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Senators Hunt For Budget Agreement

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Deal or no deal? That's the question in American politics right now as the shutdown drags on and the debt ceiling looms. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's political correspondent Mara Liasson.

NPR Story
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

'Flying Colours' Has No Fear Of Sincerity

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:05 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When you think about the geography of hip-hop, chances are you're thinking East Coast, West Coast, probably not north of the American border. That's why you probably haven't heard of Canadian hip-hop star Shad.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SHADRACH KOBANGO: (Rapping) (unintelligible) Warmest wishes of snow (unintelligible) the show (unintelligible) what I'm spitting. Oh, Michigan snow. Listen, no, I don't put on airs. I'm conditioned to blow...

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Science
7:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Bill Nye Returns To Science Entertainment

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Bill Nye, who gained a cult following as the Science Guy, has a new web series, a collaboration with NASA Why with Nye. He joins host Rachel Martin to talk about the new series.

Parallels
7:11 am
Sun October 13, 2013

A Decade On, A Boy, A Ball And A West Bank Wall

A decade ago, Israel's separation barrier cut off Ishaq Amer's home from its Palestinian village.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 8:29 am

A little more than a decade ago, in an effort to improve security, Israel began building a physical barrier in and around the West Bank.

The Amer family is among the Palestinians whose lives were disrupted. The concrete wall and fence cut them off from their village. Their son was separated from his soccer buddies, the most important thing in the world to him at the time.

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You Must Read This
7:03 am
Sun October 13, 2013

'Mezzanine' Takes The Trappings Of Everyday Life To The Next Level

iStockphoto.com

Okay, I admit it. I was going to tell you to read Proust. The thing is, a whole industry already exists around urging you to read Proust, and as well-meaning as those literary evangelists might be, they only end up making you feel unworthy, illiterate and/or lazy.

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It's All Politics
5:41 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Senate Gets A Dose Of Scolding With Its Morning Prayer

Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black has been using his morning prayer to express his displeasure with political gridlock.
Drew Angerer AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 3:21 pm

It's easy to tune out when the Senate goes through its morning rituals. The president pro tem calls the chamber to order; there's the Pledge of Allegiance. One morning could sound like any other.

Except for the past two weeks. Barry C. Black, the Senate chaplain, has been using his morning prayers to say exactly what he thinks is wrong with Washington lawmakers: "Remove from them that stubborn pride, which imagines itself to be above and beyond criticism."

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The Salt
5:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

(Cabbage) Heads Will Roll: How To Make A Food Network 'From Scratch'

According to journalist Allen Salkin, Emeril Lagasse initially opposed bringing Rachael Ray, pictured here in 2007, onto the Food Network – and, at first, Ray agreed with him. "You have this all wrong," she told executives, "I'm beer in a bottle; you guys are champagne."
Scott Gries Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 8:47 am

Mario Batali, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray are just a few of the stars the Food Network helped create. But what the network gave, it could also take away.

In From Scratch, author Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the network's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people — Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen — who rose and fell along the way.

Salkin tells NPR's Rachel Martin that while the network was intended for cooks, it wasn't run by them.

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Parallels
5:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

For Myanmar's Kachin Rebels, Life Teeters Between War, Peace

Members of the Kachin Independence Army train at a refugee camp in northern Myanmar.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 6:04 pm

Despite progress in its transition to democracy, Myanmar has struggled to end all the ethnic insurgencies that have long divided the country.

Now the Kachin — the last of the insurgent groups that have been fighting the government — have signed a preliminary agreement that could end the conflict.

The agreement falls short of an actual cease-fire, but calls for both sides to work "to end all armed fighting."

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Planet Money
5:34 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Models, Rules And High School Dropouts: A Guide To The Economics Nobel

The Nobel Foundation

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 3:27 pm

While a few gamblers bet real money on potential Nobel Prize winners, at Planet Money we're content to merely speculate. We're particularly interested in who might win the economics prize, which will be announced Monday morning.

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Asia
3:14 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Cyclone Inflicts Massive Damage Along Indian Coast

A man makes his way through uprooted trees after Cyclone Phailin hit Berhampur, India, on Sunday.
Bikas Das AP

An immense, powerful cyclone that lashed the Indian coast, forcing 500,000 people to evacuate and causing widespread damage, weakened Sunday after making landfall.

Five people died in the rains that fell ahead of the storm, most killed by falling branches, Indian media reported, but the situation on the ground in many areas was still unclear after Cyclone Phailin slammed into the coast Saturday evening in Orissa state, where power and communications lines were down along much of the coastline.

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