World

NPR Story
5:36 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Answers: Test Your NPR IQ With Quizzes From 'Ask Me Another'

Game #1: A Host of Hosts
The Answers

1) This fresh-sounding host is actually twelve dozen different people.
HINT: She's butted heads with Gene Simmons and Bill O'Reilly.
ANS: Terry Gross (a gross is twelve dozen)

2) This longtime NPR host sounds like a play by Chekhov, but he's strictly "for the birds."
ANS: Robert Siegel

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Parallels
5:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Despite Critics, Russia Promises A Grand Olympic Spectacle

As Sochi, Russia, prepares to host the 2014 Olympic Games, workers walk past piles of dirt at the construction site of Fisht Stadium and Olympic Park on May 20.
Artur Lebedev ITAR-TASS/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 10:04 am

As Russia prepares to host the world for the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, it faces a number of challenges: The weather is mild for winter sports; residents are complaining about being displaced; and the project is costing a huge amount of money.

Yet the Black Sea resort town, a favorite of President Vladimir Putin, is bustling with construction cranes. Workers are racing to complete high-rise hotels and state-of-the-art venues for figure skating, speedskating and hockey.

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Middle East
5:16 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Police Fire Tear Gas On Protesters In Turkey

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Turkish riot police cracked down on ongoing anti-government protests in Istanbul's iconic Taksim Square on Tuesday.

The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Egypt Said To Be In Talks With Ethiopia Over Nile Dam Plan

A May 28 photo shows the Blue Nile in Ethiopia, during a diversion ceremony for the country's dam project. Egypt says it is against the plan.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Egypt's leaders are negotiating with Ethiopia over a Nile River dam project the Ethiopians have begun building, according to reports. The news comes after a week of forceful talk about the dam project, including one session with Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi in which politicians discussed armed intervention, apparently not aware their words were being broadcast on live television.

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The Salt
5:12 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Tender Beef, Without The Pathogens: USDA Proposes Labeling Rules

Meat tenderized the old-fashioned way. The industrial method is a mechanized process involving needles.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:27 pm

In order to make tough cuts of beef more tender, the industry uses a mechanical tenderizing process that involves piercing the meat with needles.

This is effective in breaking up the tough muscle fibers, but there's a downside, too: a higher risk of surface bacteria making their way into the cut of meat, which can set the stage for food poisoning. That's a particular concern when it comes to the center of meat cuts, which don't get heated to the same temperatures as the exterior.

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All Tech Considered
4:42 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Did Sony Already Win Gaming's Next-Gen Console War?

Sony Computer Entertainment President and CEO Andrew House introduces the new PlayStation 4 at an Electronic Entertainment Expo media briefing in Los Angeles on Monday.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:20 pm

OK, so it might be a little presumptuous to call a winner considering that neither Sony's nor Microsoft's new console is on the market quite yet.

On Monday, however, on the first day of the Electronic Entertainment Expo, where the gaming industry tells consumers what to buy this holiday season, Sony dropped the mic to universal applause, as Digital Trends described it.

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NPR Story
4:42 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Mandela Remains In Hospital In Serious Condition

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Nelson Mandela has been hospitalized since Saturday with a recurring lung infection. The government says his condition is unchanged — serious, but stable. But his poor health and advanced age — 94 — suggest the former president's days are numbered. Retired archbishop Desmond Tutu described the anti-apartheid campaigner as an "extraordinary gift".

The Salt
4:35 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

The Latest In Adventurous Tastings? Prison Food

Sean Kelley, senior vice president at the Eastern State Penitentiary, displays a plate of "food loaf," a punishment food currently served in Pennsylvania prisons. Over the weekend, the historic penitentiary, now a museum, served visitors sample meals from the 1800s, 1900s and today.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 11:11 am

Our fascination with prison food is usually limited to death row prisoners' elaborate last meal requests and urban legends about disturbingly low-grade meat. But nowadays, the walls between the prison cafeteria and the outside world are coming down, at least metaphorically.

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Animals
4:34 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

To Crack Down On Rhino Poaching, Authorities Turn To Drones

This young female rhinoceros, photographed in Kenya in 2011, was killed by ivory poachers a few months after this photo was taken.
Courtesy of Tom Snitch

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

A crowd of wildlife rangers gathered on a woody hillside in Nepal last year to try something they'd never done before. A man held what looked like an overgrown toy airplane in his right hand, arm cocked as if to throw it into the sky. As his fellow rangers cheered, he did just that. A propeller took over, sending it skyward.

The craft was an unmanned aerial vehicle, also known as a drone, though not the military kind. Its wingspan was about 7 feet, and it carried only a video camera that filmed the forest below.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

ACLU Files Lawsuit Over Vast Collection Of Phone Records

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:57 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration over its practice of collecting vast data about the phone calls made in the United States. The ACLU claims the government surveillance violates the Constitution's guarantee of free speech, association and privacy.

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All Songs Considered
3:51 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Discussion: The Year In Music (So Far), 2013

Clockwise from upper left: Kacey Musgraves, Daft Punk, David Bowie, Valerie June, Chance The Rapper, Wayne Coyne of the Flaming Lips
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 9:02 pm

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Shots - Health News
3:48 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea Rises In Great Britain

A public health poster from 1952 encourages Americans to get checked for sexually transmitted diseases. Gonorrhea is the second-most-common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 300,000 cases reported in 2011.
Images from the History of Medicine

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 12:31 pm

Forms of gonorrhea that don't respond to the last line of antibiotics have rapidly spread in Great Britain, expanding the reach of drug-resistant disease.

The number of gonorrhea cases with decreased sensitivity to the front-line drug cefixime increased by nearly six times from 2004 to 2011 in England and Wales, a team from the U.K.'s Health Protection Agency reported Tuesday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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World Cafe
3:36 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Low Cut Connie On World Cafe

Low Cut Connie.
Emad Hasan Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 5:53 pm

Low Cut Connie is a Philadelphia band led by piano player Adam Weiner, who's a born ham: an entertainer who will pound his piano (and his listeners) into submission. Low Cut Connie began when Weiner and his partner, Englishman Dan Finnemore, decided to team up.

In this installment of World Cafe, the band plays music from last year's Call Me Sylvia and tells the tale of bonding in a stuck freight elevator.

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Kitchen Window
3:03 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Kitchen Window: A Guide to Grilling Beyond 'Dude Food'

Peter Ogburn for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 1:40 pm

I have vivid memories of my mom going out of town one weekend and my dad feeding me fried bologna sandwiches for three nights in a row. He didn't make the sandwiches because I liked them; he made them because he can't cook. He can't get around a kitchen. He doesn't know how to chop an onion. He has no idea how to roast a chicken. But the man can grill.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:57 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

A Brave New World: Big Data's Big Dangers

Big Data may not be much to look at, but it can be powerful stuff. For instance, this is what the new National Security Agency (NSA) data center in Bluffdale, Utah, looks like.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:12 pm

New technologies are not all equal. Some do nothing more than add a thin extra layer to the top-soil of human behavior (i.e., Teflon and the invention of non-stick frying pans). Some technologies, however, dig deeper, uprooting the norms of human behavior and replacing them with wholly new possibilities. For the last few months I have been arguing that Big Data — the machine-based collection and analysis of astronomical quantities of information — represents such a turn.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

U.S. To Recommend Listing All Chimpanzees As Endangered

Chimpanzees are political animals who understand shared power and the benefits that flow from reconciliation.
Peter Steffen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:31 pm

The United States Fish and Wildlife Service announced a proposal today that would designate all chimpanzees as an endangered species.

Currently, chimps in the wild are classified as endangered but those in captivity are not classified as such. The Washington Post reports that the change could affect chimps that are used in medical research and are used as pets.

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Music
2:10 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

As An Indie Musician, Chad Lawson Finds 'The Space Between'

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:08 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:10 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

'One And Only': The Argument For Raising Just One

Lauren Sandler is a journalist, only child, and mother of one.
Justin Lane

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 3:03 pm

In 1907, the first president of the American Psychological Association called only children "sickly, selfish, strange, and stupid." He concluded that "being an only child is a disease in itself."

In her book One and Only: The Freedom of Having an Only Child, and the Joy of Being One, journalist Lauren Sandler takes on these stereotypes and sifts through a huge body of research that debunks many of the worst myths about only children.

Sandler, an only child and mother of one, talks to NPR's Lynn Neary about the joys of raising just one.

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The Picture Show
1:29 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

100 Words: On The Shadows Of The Disappeared

Mirta Clara and her husband were arrested in 1975 for involvement with the Montoneros political group. Once in custody, she was tortured while pregnant with her second son, who today suffers mental problems. Her husband was executed in what is known as the Margarita Belen Massacre. She was finally released in 1983 and today works as a human rights advocate and psychologist in Buenos Aires.
Joao Pina Courtesy of FotoVisura

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:38 am

In 1975, the right-wing dictatorships of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay and Paraguay embarked on a military plan called Operation Condor. The mission was to eliminate opponents to the regimes. Many of the victims came to be known as the "Disappeared," because the government would simply make its detractors vanish.

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The Salt
12:40 pm
Tue June 11, 2013

Za'atar: A Spice Mix With Biblical Roots And Brain Food Reputation

Lebanese bread topped with za'atar, a spice mix ubiquitous in the Middle East.
Photostock Israel Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 11:27 am

NPR Morning Edition Host Steve Inskeep recently traveled to Damascus for a series of reports on the ongoing war in Syria. He sent this postcard from the road.

Dear Salt:

On my first day in Damascus, I went walking in the ancient bazaar — narrow stone-paved streets surrounding a great stone mosque. The mosque is so old, it used to be a church during the Roman Empire, and before it was a church, it was a pagan temple. The bazaar is surely as old as the mosque, for Damascus is a historic city of trade.

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