World

The Two-Way
9:21 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Another Report Shows Home Prices Taking A Big Jump

A sale pending sign in front of a home in San Francisco on May 28.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 10:18 am

One week after the S&P/Case-Shiller indices showed a 10.9 percent jump in U.S. home prices from March 2012 to March 2013 — the biggest year-over-year gain in that data since April 2006 — there's another report showing a similar jump in April.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Pistorius Murder Trial Postponed Until August

South African Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius stands in the Magistrate Court in Pretoria on Tuesday.
Alexander Joe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 10:16 am

After a brief 15-minute hearing today in a courthouse in Pretoria, South Africa, a magistrate agreed to postpone the murder trial of Oscar Pistorius until August.

Pistorius, if you remember, is the so-called blade runner who made history during the London Olympics. He became the first double-amputee to compete in the Games.

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The Picture Show
9:03 am
Tue June 4, 2013

100 Words: The Life Of A Sibling With Disability

Monia is my sister. She has been disabled since birth. My mother takes care of her every day, every hour, always. Monia's world is a world away from everything else: solitary, confined, but not empty, where time is made up of moments, a present that does not need to project into the future.
Giovanni Cocco

Being the sibling of a person with disability is a crucial experience. It is hard to explain the importance and intensity of this special bond made of codes, silence, looks, old games and new ways of living as grown-ups.

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The Two-Way
8:35 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Top Stories: 'Deacon' Jones Dies; IRS Hearings Resume

Dennis Brack Landov

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 10:10 am

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Afghanistan
8:11 am
Tue June 4, 2013

U.S. Worries Afghan Forces Will Divide Along Ethnic Lines

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

When the American combat mission in Afghanistan ends next year, one concern for U.S. officials is the possibility that the Afghan security forces will then splinter along ethnic lines, and the warlords of the past will reemerge.

From Kandahar, here's NPR's Tom Bowman.

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Live in Concert
8:03 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Rhye, Live In Concert

NPR

This is some of the sexiest music I've heard in years, with seductive sounds that are subtle and fragrant. Rhye is the music of Danish songwriter-producer Robin Hannibal and Toronto-born Mike Milosh, a man with an androgynous and mysterious voice. In fact, when the band's music first surfaced — with no press photos or posted lineup — many thought a woman was singing these songs.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:03 am
Tue June 4, 2013

'Becoming Traviata': A Look At Opera From Behind The Curtain

Soprano Natalie Dessay, with tenor Charles Castonovo, in Philippe Béziat's documentary Becoming Traviata.
Distrib Films

It's easy to think of opera as little more than an affected flock of singers warbling onstage in lacy brocade with pancake makeup, chandeliers and champagne.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Book News: Neruda's Death? Experts Say The Assassin Didn't Do It

Chilean poet Pablo Neruda arrives in Capri, Italy, in 1952.
Keystone Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:57 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Reports: American Woman Gang-Raped In India

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 10:09 am

"Indian police say that a 30-year-old American woman has been gang-raped in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh," the BBC writes. "Police said that the woman had been attacked after she accepted a lift by a group of men in a truck in Manali, a resort town in the state."

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Food For Thought In Shriver's 'Big Brother'

iStockphoto.com

Lionel Shriver tackles a whopper of an issue in her new novel, Big Brother: obesity and the emotional connection between weight, consumption, guilt and control. She comes at this huge subject through a sister torn between saving her morbidly obese older brother, who has "buried himself in himself," and an unsympathetic, belligerently fit husband — a situation that raises questions about divided loyalties and whether blood is thicker than water. In this book, diet protein shakes are thicker than both.

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Political Junkie
6:48 am
Tue June 4, 2013

It's ScuttleButton Time!

Ken Rudin collection

It's time to solve this week's ScuttleButton puzzle.

ScuttleButton, of course, is that once-a-week waste of time exercise in which each Tuesday or Wednesday I put up a vertical display of buttons on this site. Your job is to simply take one word (or concept) per button, add 'em up, and, hopefully, you will arrive at a famous name or a familiar expression. (And seriously, by familiar, I mean it's something that more than one person on Earth would recognize.)

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Tue June 4, 2013

'Deacon' Jones, The NFL's Original Sackmaster, Dies

Football great David "Deacon" Jones in 2010.
David Livingston Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 10:05 am

David "Deacon" Jones, a hall of fame defensive lineman credited with coining the term "sack" for how he would tackle opposing teams' quarterbacks, has died.

He was 74.

According to the NFL's Washington Redskins, the last team Jones played for, he "passed away [Monday] from natural causes at his home in Southern California."

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Afghanistan
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Growing Up An Afghan Warlord's Son

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Renee Montagne recently returned from a reporting trip to Afghanistan. While there, she talked to young Afghan men, who are the sons of former warlords. The men who spent their youths fighting the Soviets on the battlefields of Afghanistan, sent their sons to universities abroad.

Health
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Moldova Grapples With Whether To Isolate TB Patients

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. We heard yesterday about efforts here in the U.S. to fight tuberculosis, often successfully. But in many parts of the world, tuberculosis is not only out of control, the germ is becoming even more dangerous. Strains of TB have emerged that are difficult, if not impossible to treat.

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Business
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Jello Tries Out Edgy Social Media Campaign

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Jell-O is jiggling up the Twitter-verse.

NPR's Travis Larchuk reports the wholesome brand has an edgy new social media campaign.

TRAVIS LARCHUK, BYLINE: Jell-O's classic commercials end on these five letters...

(SOUNDBITE OF JINGLE)

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Singing) J-E-L-L-O!

LARCHUK: But on Twitter, the company's pared it down to just three letters, F-M-L.

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Business
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with GM's continued revival.

Four years after being kicked out of the Standard & Poor's 500, General Motors returns to the index this week. The Detroit automaker will rejoin both the S&P 100 and 500 indices this Thursday after the stock market closes. GM replaces H.J. Heinz, which will no longer be a publicly traded company.

Business
5:30 am
Tue June 4, 2013

See-Through Problem Corrected, Lululemon Pants Are Back

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is back in black.

The news-making black yoga pants by the label Lululemon are back on store shelves and online. The sportswear company was forced to recall the pants two months ago because they were too sheer.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Lululemon blamed the see-through blunder on a style change and production problems. The retailer hired a new team to make the pants more opaque. The company said the fabric of the new pants has been put through an exhaustive range of tests.

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Parallels
3:47 am
Tue June 4, 2013

As U.S. Troops Draw Down, Can Afghans Take The Lead?

Villagers in Kasan gather to meet with Afghan local police and the Afghan National Army along with ANASF team members during a morning shura to discuss security.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:25 am

There's just a sliver of light in the eastern sky as the patrol leaves the American compound through a thick metal door.

They scamper across Highway 2, a narrow asphalt road that leads to Kabul, just an hour's drive away — if not for the war. They cross an old graveyard and head toward the silhouette of a tree line, all seen through the eerie green glow of night-vision goggles.

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Author Interviews
3:28 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Book Explores Downfall Of An Indian-American Business Icon

Rajat Gupta, former Goldman Sachs director and former senior partner at McKinsey & Co., was sentenced to two years in prison for leaking inside information to hedge fund manager Raj Rajaratnam.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:10 am

Rajat Gupta was one of the wealthiest and most successful men in America and an icon of the Indian-American community. Today, he faces two years in prison for insider trading, convicted of passing corporate secrets to his billionaire friend and Galleon Group founder Raj Rajaratnam.

Gupta was already a wealthy man; what was the motive for his crime? In The Billionaire's Apprentice:The Rise of the Indian-American Elite and the Fall of the Galleon Hedge Fund, journalist Anita Raghavan tries to answer that question.

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Parallels
3:27 am
Tue June 4, 2013

High-Tech Sensors Help Old Port City Leap Into Smart Future

The Spanish city of Santander is using a network of sensors to help improve services and save money. Incidents reported to Santander's command-and-control center, where the city manages data from sensors and smartphone reports made by citizens, are plotted on a map of the city.
Courtesy of the University of Cantabria

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 1:53 pm

Aside from the occasional ferry down from England, the old Spanish port city of Santander doesn't get too many foreign visitors. So imagine the locals' surprise when delegations from Google, Microsoft and the Japanese government all landed there recently, to literally walk the streets.

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