World

Parallels
2:55 am
Wed May 29, 2013

After The War, A Bitter Feud Remains In Two Libyan Towns

A destroyed home in Tawargha, south of Misrata, on June 5, 2012. Residents have not returned home for fear of death.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 9:04 pm

Little boys play soccer in the afternoon heat at a makeshift camp near Libya's capital Tripoli. Their homes, or what's left of them, are in Tawargha, a small town about 20 miles from the Mediterranean coast.

The town has been empty since August of 2011. Its residents fled in cars and on foot, under fire from rebel militiamen from the nearby town of Misrata.

The siege of Misrata was one of the bloodiest battles of the Libyan war. Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi shelled Misrata relentlessly, killing hundreds.

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Kitchen Window
2:03 am
Wed May 29, 2013

Rhubarb Brings Spring To The Table

Nicole Spiridakis for NPR

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 1:48 pm

Rhubarb — like spring itself — is fleeting and lovely. A vegetable that often masquerades as a fruit in sweet dishes, it is a true harbinger of the season, appearing in April and, if we're lucky, lasting until July. But it is best to seize rhubarb's moment and take full advantage as soon as its delicate pink and green ribs start appearing in markets and gardens.

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Sweetness And Light
10:03 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

One More Swing: 'Casey At The Bat'

Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 11:03 am

Frank Deford puts aside his gripes this week to pay tribute to the poem by Ernest Lawrence Thayer, first published in the San Francisco Examiner 125 years ago June 3.

The Outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day:
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play.
And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,
A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game.

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The Two-Way
7:00 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Head Of White House Economic Council To Step Down

Alan Krueger, Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, shown in November.
Jacquelyn Martin Associated Press

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:13 pm

Alan Krueger, the chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, says he will step down to return to Princeton to resume his post as a professor of economics.

Krueger, who has served as CEA chairman for the past two years, will return to Princeton in time for the beginning of the fall term. The Associated Press quotes a source familiar with the situation as saying Jason Furman, who served in President Obama's 2008 campaign, will be tapped as a replacement.

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It's All Politics
5:59 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

For Chris Christie, Obama Connection Has Risks, Rewards

President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie walk along the boardwalk in Point Pleasant, N.J., on Tuesday. Obama traveled to New Jersey to join Christie in touring the Jersey Shore and inspecting its recovery efforts from Superstorm Sandy.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:51 pm

President Obama's second trip to New Jersey to meet with Republican Gov. Chris Christie post-Superstorm Sandy was accompanied Tuesday with a familiar flurry of speculation.

The first time, last fall, Christie's gracious welcome of the president raised questions about whether it might affect Obama's re-election just weeks later.

This time, the questions were inverted: How might Christie's own presidential aspirations be affected by his friendly proximity to the president?

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This Is NPR
5:55 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Breaking the Sound Barrier - NPR Labs Brings Radio To Hearing Impaired

Once audio is converted to text, the text can be transmitted to Refreshable Braille Displays which can be read by the deaf-blind.
NPR Labs

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 1:32 pm

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The Two-Way
5:42 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

VIDEO: Derailment Near Baltimore Causes Huge Explosion

Mark Paugh carries his 15-month-old son Ryan as they watch smoke from a train derailment in White Marsh, Md. on Tuesday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 1:00 pm

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It's All Politics
5:37 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Why Bob Dole's Advice To His Party Fell Flat

Bob Dole, the former U.S. senator and Republican Party leader from Kansas, during his Fox News Sunday interview.
Fox News Sunday screenshot

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:26 pm

The reaction was predictably negative: When former Sen. Bob Dole on Sunday criticized how far the current party has shifted right and advised fellow Republicans to take a timeout for a party self-examination, conservatives almost immediately dismissed him as an anachronism.

One of the few — if not the only — Republicans who seemed willing to openly support the 1996 GOP presidential nominee and former Senate party leader Tuesday was another marginalized former senator, Republican Olympia Snowe of Maine.

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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Wal-Mart To Pay $81 Million For Hazardous Waste Dumping

A photo from earlier this month taken in front of a Wal-Mart store in La Habra, Calif.
Jae C. Hong Associated Press

Wal-Mart Stores has agreed to pay $81 million in penalties as part of a guilty plea on criminal charges of improperly disposing of hazardous waste in California and Missouri.

Prosecutors said the violations occurred between 2003 and 2005 and included employees negligently dumping pollutants from stores into sanitation drains.

The Associated Press reports that the plea agreements announced Tuesday "end a nearly decade-old investigation involving more than 20 prosecutors and 32 environmental groups."

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Planet Money
5:17 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

In A Single ATM, The Story Of A Nation's Economy

A bank in Yangon recently opened the first ATM in Myanmar that's connected to the rest of the world.
Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 4:35 pm

Nan Htwe Nye works at an elementary school in Yangon, Myanmar. She started trying to use ATM machines a few months ago, and things haven't been going so well.

The machines are often broken, she says. "But," she adds, "we hope it will better in the future." This is, more or less, the story of ATMs — and of banking in general — in Myanmar.

She's visiting the headquarters of CB Bank, at the first ATM in the country that was connected to banks all around the world.

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Europe
5:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Woolwich Murder Suspect May Have Ties To Islamist Groups

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The killing last week of a British soldier on a London street in broad daylight has raised questions for the police, the government and the British people at large. In a few minutes, we'll talk about reaction to the murder, including some anti-Muslim attacks. First, some of the latest developments.

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Europe
5:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Rise After Murder Of British Soldier

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, the repercussions of Lee Rigby's murder in British society, what damage did the gruesome public declaration of responsibility for the killing do to relations between Muslims and other Britains? Well, joining us now is John Burns, London bureau chief for the New York Times. Welcome to the program once again.

JOHN BURNS: It's a pleasure.

SIEGEL: There have been reports of increased attacks on British Muslims since last week. How bad has it been?

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Latin America
5:15 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Catholic Church Moderates Ceasefire Between Honduran Gangs

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 9:21 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

In Honduras today, the nation's two most powerful gangs announced a cease-fire. The Roman Catholic Church mediated the agreement. And the announcement took place inside a prison, in what's considered the world's deadliest city, San Pedro Sula. NPR's Carrie Kahn is there, and she joins me now. And, Carrie, describe the scene at the cease-fire announcement today in prison.

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The Two-Way
4:37 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Little Dog Does A Big Job In Oregon

Xander, a pug mix, lost both his eyes in an accident. He now works as a therapy dog, and visits groups such as this class at a daycare center.
Steven Silton Herald and News

He can't see, and he's not very big — but as dogs go, Xander the pug is having a big impact on his community in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The blind pup has even made the front page of the local paper, for bringing empathy and happiness to people for whom such things are in short supply.

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Shots - Health News
4:36 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Bird Flu Shrugs Off Tamiflu In 'Concerning' Development

The H7N9 virus, as seen with an electron microscope.
CDC

Chinese doctors report they've seen signs that the bird flu virus infecting humans is able to overcome one of the few drugs used to fight it.

In a report published online Tuesday by The Lancet, doctors report on 14 patients infected with the H7N9 virus and admitted to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center in April. All the people came down with pneumonia, and two died.

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NPR Story
4:28 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

After Long Wait For Combat, Tad Nagaki Became POW Liberator

After serving in World War II, Tad Nagaki returned to Nebraska to farm corn, beans and sugar beets.
Courtesy of Mary Previte

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:43 am

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who have died this year.

"Tad Nagaki was a gentle, quiet farmer," says Mary Previte, a retired New Jersey legislator and former captive of the Japanese during World War II. That quiet farmer, who did extraordinary things, died in April at the age of 93 at his grandson's Colorado home.

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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Hacking Death Of U.K. Soldier Prompts Anti-Muslim Attacks

A supporter of the far-right English Defense League gestures near Downing Street in central London on Monday.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:35 pm

There's been a sharp rise in anti-Muslim attacks and intimidation in the U.K. since last week's hacking death of British soldier Lee Rigby by two men who said they killed him in the name of Islam.

The Guardian newspaper says that Tell Mama, a hotline for reporting such attacks, registered 193 incidents by Monday evening, including 10 attacks on mosques.

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Shots - Health News
3:39 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Each Family May Have Schizophrenia In Its Own Way

Genetic changes in signaling pathways in the brain may cause schizophrenia.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 3:58 pm

Schizophrenia runs in families, but scientists have been stymied in their efforts to nail down genetic changes that could be causing the often devastating mental illness.

By zeroing in on just one pathway in the brain, scientists say they've found genetic variations that are shared in families, and tend to cause specific symptoms.

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Three Years In A Row, Australia Named Happiest Place By OECD

The sails of the Sydney Opera House are illuminated for the Vivid Sydney festival on May 24, in Sydney, Australia.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 12:13 pm

If you lived in Australia, you'd be much happier.

At least that's what you can glean from the latest Better Life Index issued by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, which ranked Australia the world's happiest nation for a third year in a row.

Because we know you're wondering: The United States is ranked No. 6, behind Australia, Sweden, Canada, Norway and Switzerland.

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The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

London Attack Suspect Leaves Hospital; More Charges Filed

A Nov. 23, 2010, photo shows Michael Adebolajo (center, in dark T-shirt) with suspected Al-Shabab recruits who were arrested by Kenyan police. Adebolajo, one of the main suspects in the brutal murder of a soldier in London, was discharged from the hospital Tuesday.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:14 am

One of the suspects in the murder last week of British soldier Lee Rigby has been released from the hospital and is in police custody. Michael Adebowale, 22, received treatment after being shot by police following the brutal attack on Rigby in Woolwich, London. The other main suspect, Michael Adebolajo, 28, remains in the hospital.

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