World

Parallels
2:13 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

'We Are Not Valued': Brazil's Domestic Workers Seek Rights

Cassia Mendes, who has worked as a housekeeper for more than 20 years, cleans a house in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Feb. 19, 2012. Brazil enacted on April 2 a constitutional amendment to grant domestic workers health insurance and other benefits.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

The phone is ringing off the hook at the crowded waiting room at the Domestic Workers Union in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil.

In the past decade, millions of Brazilians have joined the middle class. Advocates say this isn't just the result of a growing economy or social spending, but also laws like the one just passed that enshrine domestic workers' rights.

Read more
Pop Culture
2:11 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

From 'Groovy' To 'Slacks,' The Words That Date You

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION from NPR News. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Cathy, a fifth-grade teacher in Stryker, Ohio, wrote to tell us that she elicited giggles when she complemented a student's footwear and called them thongs. A self-described ex-hippie named Paul emailed that he catches himself using the phrase, that's heavy. Sooner or later, once common words or phrases take on new meanings or just seem way, way out of date. Call and tell us about the term you've used that dates you.

Read more
Parallels
2:10 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Let Them Eat Grass: Paris Employs Sheep As Eco-Mowers

Sheep used to replace gas-guzzling lawn mowers graze at a truck warehouse at Evry, south of Paris.
Francois Mori AP

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:02 pm

City officials in Paris are experimenting with an unconventional way to keep urban lawns trimmed.

Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now, she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city.

Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

Read more
Music
2:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Keith Jarrett: 'I Want The Imperfections To Remain'

Keith Jarrett, Jack DeJohnette and Gary Peacock's new album of standards is titled Somewhere.
Daniela Yohannes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 4:57 pm

Sometimes records have to steep. Four years after it was recorded live in Lucerne, Switzerland, an album of six standards called Somewhere is finally getting a proper release. Keith Jarrett and his trio, including bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette, just weren't happy with the sound of the room or the circumstances at the time. Listen to Somewhere, however, and none of that comes across.

Read more
World Cafe
2:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Next: Ace Reporter

Ace Reporter.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 12:18 pm

  • Hear Two New Songs By Ace Reporter

After a band breakup, musician Chris Snyder consoled himself with the challenge of what he called "the threesixfive project": a challenge to write a song every day for a year. This one-man band ended up with 10 songs that stuck, and those formed his debut album, Yearling.

The Brooklyn multi-instrumentalist eventually got a chance to revisit the recordings, which initially were little more than sketches, in an upstate New York studio. Listen to two songs from Yearling here.

Read more
Mountain Stage
12:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn On Mountain Stage

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 1:14 pm

Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn appear here on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia Wesleyan College. Although Washburn and Fleck have been on the show several times with numerous projects over the years, this was their first appearance anywhere as a duo.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Quincy Jones: The Man Behind The Music

Legendary music producer Quincy Jones.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:33 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 5, 2001.

Quincy Jones is one of those people to whom the word "legendary" is often attached. So it was no surprise when, on May 18, the 80-year-old Jones was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame.

Jones grew up poor on the south side of Chicago during the Depression, but moved to Seattle when he was 10. It was there, as a teenager, that Jones befriended and began collaborating with Ray Charles — a friendship that would remain strong until Charles' death in 2004.

Read more
Commentary
11:18 am
Mon May 27, 2013

After WWII, A Letter Of Appreciation That Still Rings True

U.S. Navy sailors form a ceremonial guard at a wreath-laying ceremony to memorialize the victims of the attack on Pearl Harbor and pay tribute to the veterans of World War II in front of the Lone Sailor statue at the Naval Memorial in Washington, D.C., in December 2003.
Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:43 am

In the fall of 1945, my father was honorably discharged from the Navy. He was one of the lucky ones. He'd served on a destroyer escort during the war, first in convoys dodging U-boats in the Atlantic and then in the Pacific where his ship, the USS Schmitt, shot down two kamikaze planes. My dad always kept a framed picture of the Schmitt above his dresser, but, like most men of his generation, he didn't talk a lot about his war years.

Read more
Author Interviews
8:33 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Questions For Barbara J. King, Author Of 'How Animals Grieve'

iStockphoto.com

Attributing human characteristics to animals makes for great cartoons, but it's not usually considered rigorous science. Now, a new book argues that animals do think and feel in ways similar to humans.

Barbara J. King is a professor of anthropology and a commentator on NPR's science blog, 13.7. And her book, How Animals Grieve, makes a powerful case for the presence of love, affection and grief in animals — from a house cat mourning her lost sister to elephants who pay respects to the bones of their matriarchs.

Read more
Books
7:03 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Do Sit Under The Apple Tree With These Romantic Reads For Memorial Day

World War II had more than its share of horrors — but it was also a very romantic era, as this famous photograph attests.
Alfred Eisenstaedt Time

Each May we end the month and begin the summer season with a grateful nod to our veterans, especially those who gave their lives in service to our country. And this year, we mark an anniversary that may not be as obvious as Pearl Harbor or D-Day, but is certainly as important: 1943, the year WWII paused before it turned around. The year the Allies were able to stop Axis victories and advances on all fronts. It would be a few more months — well into 1944 — before the Allies seriously started pushing Hitler back, but 1943 was the beginning of the end.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
6:03 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Watch A Mind-Blowing Visualization Of 'The Rite of Spring'

Stephen Malinowski

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:28 am

Read more
Afghanistan
4:48 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Food Entrepreneur Is A New Breed Of Afghan Business Owner

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 10:11 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Read more
Europe
4:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

France Pays Tribute To Early U.S. Fighter Pilots

A memorial outside Paris honors members of the Lafayette Squadron, which was started by a group of young American men in 1914 who wanted to fight for France when World War I broke out. The U.S. had not yet entered the war.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 8:47 am

Every Memorial Day weekend, a ceremony takes place just outside Paris to honor a group of Americans who fought in France. They're not D-Day veterans, but a little known group of pilots who fought for France in World War I, before the U.S. entered the war.

This year's ceremony in the tiny town of Marnes-la-Coquette began with a flyover by two French air force Mirage fighter jets from the Escadrille Lafayette, or Lafayette Squadron, paying tribute to the men who founded the group nearly 100 years ago.

Read more
Africa
4:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Kerry Visits Ethiopia

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:00 am

Secretary Of State John Kerry made a stop in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa over the weekend. Kerry was in Africa several weeks ahead of a trip to the region by President Obama.

Middle East
4:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Latest News From Syria

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene. Steve Inskeep is on assignment in Syria.

Read more
Europe
4:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Sweden Tries To Get A Handle On Riot

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:33 am

Violence has erupted over the past week in and around the Swedish capital of Stockholm. Tensions have emerged over joblessness, a growing gap between wealthy and poor and influxes of immigrants. David Greene talks to Alistair Scrutton, Stockholm bureau chief for the Reuters News Agency, for the latest on the chaos.

Author Interviews
4:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

'1913': Leads A Tour Of The World A Century Ago

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:10 am

When World War I broke out in 1914, it unleashed unimaginable carnage and upheaval. By the time the war ended four years later, nearly 40 million lives had been lost, dynasties had collapsed and the global political order was shaken to its core. But what about the year prior to the war? David Greene talks to Charles Emmerson, author of 1913: In Search Of The World Before The Great War.

Business
4:47 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Hulu's Future Depends On Which Company Buys It

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 5:06 am

Multiple companies — from Time Warner Cable to Yahoo — are said to be interested in acquiring Hulu. The site streams TV shows and movies online. Some shows on Hulu are free, but paid subscribers get access to more programming.

Shots - Health News
3:30 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Overweight People Are More Apt To Ditch Doctors

Going to the doctor may be uncomfortable for people who are worried about weight.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:08 am

Patients struggling with obesity can have a tough time finding the right doctor, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Read more
World
3:28 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Targets Of Disgraced Bo Xilai Still Languish In Jail

Chinese police lead a group of defendants, including millionaire and politician Li Qiang, to court on organized crime charges in 2009. Many of those arrested in now-imprisoned politician Bo Xilai's campaign against the mafia still remain in jail, despite serious legal questions about the process.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 6:28 am

It was 5 p.m. on an ordinary Tuesday, and Li Ping was finishing up the company accounts before going to have a facial. She was working for her brother, Li Qiang, who owned one of the biggest private transport companies in Chongqing, a major city in southwestern China.

Suddenly, five plainclothes policemen barged into the room. They asked her name, then put a black hood over her head and drove her to a secret interrogation site. Her ordeal had begun.

Read more

Pages