World

Latin America
6:19 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Trade Dispute With Mexico Over 'Dolphin-Safe' Tuna Heats Up

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Look closely at just about any can of tuna sold in the U.S. and you'll find a tiny stamp. Now for more than 20 years, that stamp has certified that no dolphins were harmed or killed when the tuna was caught. For nearly that long, Mexico and the U.S. have been fighting over that label. Mexico says it's made great strides protecting dolphins and that the U.S. now unfairly blocks Mexican tuna from its markets.

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The Two-Way
6:16 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Shutdown Quiets NASA, So Space Station Astronauts Enjoy View

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 5:20 pm

Of all the government agencies, NASA is among the hardest hit by the government shutdown. As of Oct. 1, nearly all of its employees have been told to pack up and head home.

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

WATCH: The Capitol Hill Car Chase

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 6:37 pm

A high-speed chase that ended with shots fired on Capitol Hill Thursday locked down the U.S. Capitol and the White House for a short period.

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It's All Politics
6:02 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

'Hello, This Is Your Senator Speaking. No, Really'

Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., leads a tour group of students from her home state in the Rotunda Thursday.
Evan Vucci AP

Many congressional staff members have been furloughed by the government shutdown. But that hasn't stopped the phones from ringing, or tourists from visiting.

So members of Congress have been forced to take on some additional responsibilities this week, in addition to legislating — the kinds of tasks typically handled by junior staffers and interns.

Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Dean Heller, R-Nev., are among those personally answering their office phones.

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Israel's Netanyahu Says He'd 'Consider' A Meeting With New Iranian Leader

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday.
Andrew Gombert AP

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 9:06 am

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu offered some rare, if fleeting, hope Thursday in regard to his country's relationship with Iran.

In an interview with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep, he said the election of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani "might" offer an opportunity for diplomacy and that he would "consider" meeting him.

"I don't care about the meeting. I don't have a problem with the diplomatic process," Netanyahu said.

"You're saying you would meet him?" Steve asked.

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The Picture Show
5:15 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Bill Eppridge, Photographer Who Captured RFK's Death, Dies at 75

Rigid, semiconscious, his face an ashen mask, Kennedy lies in a pool of his own blood on the concrete floor, a bullet deep in his brain and another in his neck. Juan Romero, a busboy whose hand Kennedy had shaken before the shots, tried to comfort him.
Bill Eppridge Courtesy of Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:44 am

Bill Eppridge, a legendary photojournalist who spent most of his career working for Life magazine and Sports Illustrated, died Thursday in Danbury, Conn. He had been suffering from a blood infection brought on by a fall that injured his hand, according to the National Press Photographers Association. He was 75.

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Middle East
5:12 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Chemical Weapons Inspectors In Syria Just Getting Started

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

International weapons inspectors have begun the process of verifying Syria's stockpile of chemical weapons. A team of 19 inspectors, plus staff, arrived in Damascus on Tuesday. New York Times reporter Anne Barnard is also in the Syrian capital, and I asked her how the inspectors' mission will work.

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It's All Politics
5:10 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Shutdown? Not For Political Fundraising

The morning sun illuminates the U.S. Capitol on Monday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 6:52 pm

(Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET with RNC numbers)

The government shutdown might be bad for federal employees, but it's turning out to be a boon for political fundraising.

Party committees and outside groups on both sides of the aisle have latched on to the latest Washington budget crisis, using the moment to rile their bases and fill their coffers for the 2014 campaign.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:44 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Why Gorillas Aren't Sexist And Orangutans Don't Rape

Patrick at the Dallas Zoo
AP

Last week the Dallas Zoo announced that it was shipping one of its largest, most popular residents to the Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens in Columbia, South Carolina.

Patrick, a 430-pound silverback male gorilla who has lived in Dallas for 18 of his 23 years, just doesn't like the company of other gorillas. He's underscored his preference for solitude by nipping or biting the females. The Riverbanks Zoo has a reputation for helping in cases like this and Patrick will move there soon.

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Shots - Health News
4:34 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Delirium In The ICU May Pose Ongoing Risk Of Thinking Problems

Hospital intensive care units save lives, but people there often suffer from delirium.
Cal EMA / Flickr

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 7:39 am

People admitted to a hospital's intensive care unit often suffer from delirium. Many of those people end up with thinking problems months after they leave the hospital, a study finds.

Nearly three quarters of the 821 ICU patients the researchers tracked suffered from delirium, which can include confusion, agitation and short-term memory loss. That's not unusual, especially for very sick people like those in this study, most of whom were on ventilators.

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World Cafe
4:33 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Valerie June On World Cafe

Valerie June.
Courtesy of the artist

Valerie June has been perfecting a blend of folk, blues and Appalachian-influenced music for nearly a decade, jump-starting her career with well-received local releases in Memphis. After a relocation to Brooklyn, June released Pushin' Against a Stone — her national debut — which was co-produced by Kevin Augunus and Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys.

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Parallels
4:01 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Ask Me Anything: Sylvia Poggioli Answers Redditors' Questions

Instagram

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 5:27 pm

NPR's Rome-based senior European correspondent Sylvia Poggioli fielded topics ranging from Pope Francis and the Vatican and rising xenophobia in Europe to the one thing she wished more Americans knew about Europe and her favorite TV show (The Wire!) during her Reddit "Ask Me Anything" Thursday.


Highlights

On Pope Francis

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Alt.Latino
4:00 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Cumbia: The Musical Backbone Of Latin America

Los Gaiteros De San Jacinto
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 2:43 pm

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All Tech Considered
3:58 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Your Digital Trail: Data Fuels Political And Legal Agendas

Private attorneys are easily getting access to defendants' emails and texts. All it takes is a subpoena, which any attorney can do.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:38 am

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

In Photos: Car Chase From White House Ends In Gunshots

People run for cover near the U.S. Capitol after reports of gunshots. Police ordered a lockdown for about an hour, and both houses of Congress went into recess.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 6:05 pm

A photo gallery of the incident outside the U.S. Capitol.

From Scratch
3:35 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Bob Silvers, Co-Founder Of New York Review Of Books

Host Jessica Harris speaks with Bob Silvers, co-founder of New York Review of books, a leading journal of books and ideas. Harris also speaks with Fred Swaniker, founder of African Leadership Academy, an institution focused on developing Africa's next generation of leaders.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
2:49 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Why Lots Of Grass-Fed Beef Sold In U.S. Comes From Down Under

Patricia Whisnant, who runs Rain Crow Ranch in Doniphan, Mo., says her grass-fed beef can compete with the Australian product because it has a better story American consumers can connect with.
Courtesy of Rain Crow Ranch

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 2:24 pm

Beef from cattle that have grazed only on pasture is in high demand — much to the surprise of many meat retailers, who didn't traditionally think of grass-fed beef as top-quality.

George Siemon, a founder of Organic Valley, the big organic food supplier, says the push for grass-fed beef started with activists who wanted to challenge a beef industry dominated by factory-scale feedlots. In those feedlots, cattle are fed a corn-heavy diet designed to make the animals gain weight as quickly as possible.

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The Two-Way
2:45 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Suspect Dead, Two Police Officers Injured In Chase At U.S. Capitol

A police officer checks out a car on grass with his canine near the U.S. Capitol on Thursday in Washington, D.C. The Capitol and the White House were placed on lockdown after an 'active shooter' situation was reported.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 9:39 am

We last updated this post at 7:19 p.m. ET.

A woman who authorities say tried to ram a security barrier outside the White House led the Secret Service and U.S. Capitol Police on a high-speed chase that ended near Capitol Hill, where gunshots were fired by police. Congressional lawmakers were briefly ordered to shelter in place, but by 3 p.m. ET, police had lifted the lockdown.

The incident left a suspect dead and two police officers injured. The 1-year-old child who was in the car with the suspect is OK and in protective custody.

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All Songs Considered
2:02 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

The Good Listener: Must We All 'Love' Music? Must We All Have 'Good Taste'?

This guy obsesses over your tastes in music. Should you?
Courtesy of Touchstone Pictures

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the flyers urging us to replace our nonexistent maid service is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives — and, this week, a pair of queries about the importance of loving the right music.

Jennifer Yousfi writes via Facebook: "I have horrible taste in music. How do I fix this?"

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
1:52 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Helen Sung On JazzSet

Helen Sung performs at the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival at the Kennedy Center.
Margot Schulman Courtesy of the Kennedy Center

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 10:09 am

This episode of JazzSet was recorded at the 18th edition of the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Festival at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. Dee Dee Bridgewater is the emcee, while WBGO's Rhonda Hamilton serves as our co-host.

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