World

Code Switch
3:31 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

The First Lady, A Heckler And Public Dissent

The first lady was confronted by a heckler at a private event in Washington on Tuesday.
Evan Vucci ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 5:30 pm

When Michelle Obama squared off with a heckler at a private fundraiser last night, the racial context was hard to ignore: a white woman yelling at the country's most visible black woman and that same black woman offering a pointed response.

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All Songs Considered
3:03 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

First Watch: Grant Olney, 'Not From Body'

A tiny owl tries to find its way in the world, in a new animated video from singer-songwriter Grant Olney.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 9:15 pm

When singer-songwriter Grant Olney started working on his latest album, Hypnosis For Happiness, he never imagined it'd take six years to finish. But after laying down the first tracks in 2006, Olney left for the U.K. and the Netherlands to pursue a Ph.D. in mathematics. After finishing a 300-page dissertation on something called "high dimensional geometry," Olney returned to music and found himself reflecting on identity, friendship and what it means to really know someone. It's a knotty mix of emotions and ideas he tackles in a touching new video for the song "Not From Body."

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Favorite Sessions
2:31 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Patty Griffin Sings A Song For Her Father

Patty Griffin performs a live studio session at WFUV in New York City.
Dan Brauer WFUV

Patty Griffin is back on the road to support American Kid, her seventh studio album, which she wrote as a tribute to her father. She recorded the album in Memphis, working with Luther and Cody Dickinson from the North Mississippi Allstars. Robert Plant, Griffin's tourmate and significant other, also makes an appearance on the album.

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The Record
2:22 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Hot 97's Summer Jam: A Referendum On Hip-Hop

The close of Kendrick Lamar's set at Summer Jam on Sunday, when Top Dawg and A$AP Rocky's crews joined him onstage.
Ilya S. Savenok Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 6:44 pm

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It's All Politics
1:43 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

The Incredible Vanishing GOP Presidential Front-Runner

GOP presidential contenders wave to the crowd in Manchester, N.H., in 1980, before a debate. From left" Philip Crane, John Connelly, John Anderson, Howard Baker, Robert Dole, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 5:17 pm

It's ridiculously, absurdly early to talk about 2016 presidential politics. Only a fool would try to predict who will be the next Republican nominee just seven months after the last election for the White House.

Still, in most election cycles, the GOP would already have an obvious front-runner by now, one who would more than likely prevail as the party's pick.

Not this time.

"This will be the most open Republican nomination in 50 years," says Tom Rath, a former GOP attorney general of New Hampshire and a veteran of early state presidential politics.

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Thistle and Shamrock
1:34 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Thistle And Shamrock: Easy Does It

Dougie MacLean
Courtesy of the artist

There's more to this roots music business than high-energy dance tunes. Kick back with some soothing voices and some free-spirited instrumentals.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
1:24 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

A Look Ahead To The Future Of The GOP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 4:06 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Chris Christie calls a very special election in Jersey. Missouri 8th voters call for Jason Smith, and a House committee chair calls out the White House spokesman. It's Wednesday and time for a...

REPRESENTATIVE DARRELL ISSA: Paid liar...

CONAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

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Middle East
1:18 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

After Protests, Evaluating Turkey's Role As A Democracy

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 4:06 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

In 'TransAtlantic', Author Colum McCann Returns Home

Random House

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 11:34 am

Irish-American author Colum McCann has spent the better part of his life inhabiting others in his novels.

To write Dancer, McCann learned how to pirouette with Russia's Kirov Ballet. He spent time in Slovakia to bring the story a young Gypsy poet to life in Zoli.

In his latest book TransAtlantic, he tells the story of his native country — covering 150 years of Irish history, through the voyages of four historic visitors.

McCann talks with NPR's Neal Conan about the emigrant experience and the decision to revisit home.

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Parallels
1:12 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi Walks Fine Line In Her New Role

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been under fire for working with the government on a number of issues. Here, she meets in March with protesters who oppose a copper mine backed by Chinese investors. She supports the mining project.
Khin Maung Win AP

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 6:19 pm

To her many admirers in the international community, Aung San Suu Kyi remains one of the world's best known democracy icons.

But in Myanmar, also known as Burma, she is now very much a politician who is being criticized for trying to cooperate with the former military rulers who kept her under house arrest for nearly two decades.

If you want to see the old, iconic Aung San Suu Kyi, just head to the bustling headquarters of her party, the National League for Democracy, or NLD, in Yangon, the country's largest city and former capital.

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Business
12:46 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Hollywood Wants A Piece Of The Action In China's Movie Market

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 3:54 pm

Box office receipts in China reached new highs last year, and American filmmakers want to tap into that market. Host Michel Martin speaks with Los Angeles Times reporter John Horn, about the growth of the Chinese movie market, and how Hollywood plans to cash in.

Movies
12:46 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

'Coming To America' Never Fails For Rapper Common

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 3:54 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally, you know those movies you pull out time and time again when you can't figure out what you want to watch. Our colleagues at Weekends on All Things Considered regularly ask filmmakers and actors about the movies they never get tired of watching. Today, rapper and actor Common tells us about one of his favorites.

COMMON: Peace, this is Common and I'm a artist, an actor. And the movie I've seen a million times is "Coming to America," directed by John Landis, starring Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, and James Earl Jones.

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Asia
12:46 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Why Are Americans Afraid Of China?

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 3:54 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
12:46 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Toledo, Ohio: Chinese Investment Wanted

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 3:54 pm

Mayor Michael Bell hopes Chinese investment will help revive his blue-collar city. He helped broker a deal to sell a chunk of Toledo's waterfront to Chinese investors. Host Michel Martin and Mayor Bell discuss investments with China and what he thinks President Obama and China President Xi Jinping can accomplish during their U.S. visit.

History
12:42 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

China's Conjoined Twins Still Fascinate, Two Centuries Later

The Bunker brothers with some members of their family.
Courtesy of Surry Arts Council

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 4:05 pm

Born to Chinese parents in what is now Thailand, Eng and Chang Bunker became famous throughout the world as "Siamese twins." The brothers were joined at the base of their chests. After years of being displayed at exhibitions, they settled in the mountains of North Carolina in the 1830s. They married two local North Carolina sisters and had a total of 21 children.

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

U.S. Soldier Pleads Guilty In 2012 Afghan Shooting Rampage

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales (left), the U.S. soldier who allegedly shot and killed 16 civilians in Afghanistan, at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23.
Defense Video and Imagery Distribution System AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 2:34 pm

The United States soldier charged with the murder of 16 Afghan villagers entered a guilty plea on Wednesday during a court hearing at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state.

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales pleaded guilty to 16 counts of premeditated murder, The Seattle Times reports, but he pleaded not guilty to "attempting to impede an investigation into the case by damaging a laptop computer."

The Times adds:

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Planet Money
12:28 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

Freeway Rick Ross Has A New Business

via freewayenterprise.com

In 2011, we talked to Freeway Rick Ross (pictured), about the economics of illegal drugs. Ross was one of the biggest crack dealers in LA in the '80s and '90s, and he confirmed for us what a lot of economists say about illegal drugs — making them illegal drives up the price and makes criminals rich. Ross told us that he once grossed $3 million in a single day.

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Parallels
12:00 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

A Small Farming Town Becomes Ground Zero In Syria's War

Syrian soldiers stand in the main square of the western city of Qusair. Government troops recaptured the town on Wednesday after rebels had held it for more than a year. It's seen as a significant victory for President Bashar Assad's government.
STR AFP/Getty images

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 12:50 pm

Qusair is a sleepy farming town not far from my hometown. I passed through it many times as a child and never imagined it would one day make international headlines as the focal point of Syria's civil war.

I wish it had remained a quiet place defined by the many agricultural fields of wheat and barley, along with apricot and apple trees, all of them well-watered by the Orontes River.

Less than 10 miles from the Lebanese border, Qusair was a mixed town of Christians, Sunnis and Shiites. Not anymore.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Wed June 5, 2013

Hilarious: Israeli Education Minister Can't Stop Laughing

Shai Piron.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 1:14 pm

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:33 am
Wed June 5, 2013

Other Planets: From Speculation To Confirmation

This illustration shows the relative sizes of the habitable-zone planets Kepler-22b, Kepler-69c, Kepler-62e, Kepler-62f and the Earth.
NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech

Last week NASA scientists put the space telescope Kepler in a kind of technological coma. The craft, designed to search for Earth-like planets orbiting stars in our cosmic neighborhood (within a few thousand light-years, that is), failed and seems to be unfixable. (Hope remains, though.)

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