World

Parallels
12:20 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Like Anthony Weiner, German Politician Gives One-Finger Salute

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:15 pm

If two politicians on different continents both give an upthrust middle finger to the camera in the same week, is that enough to call it a global trend?

Perhaps we need one more, but here's what we have so far.

First there was failed New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, who, in a rare display of impulsive behavior, expressed his feelings toward a reporter as he left his election night party Tuesday.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Are We There Yet? Voyager 1 Finally Answers 'Yes'

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. It's one of the most enduring questions in modern space exploration, a puzzle scientists have been trying to solve for years. Are we there yet? Where is the Voyager 1 spacecraft? Where is it right now in relationship to where we are?

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED SHOW)

FLATOW: Well, it's 11 billion miles out...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Voyager 1 will be leaving the region called the Helio...

FLATOW: Tell us where it is? How do you know that it's at the edge of our solar...

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Stephen Hawking Looks Back

Stephen Hawking is known for his research into relativity, black holes, and quantum mechanics, as well as for the disease that has left him almost entirely paralyzed. But the theoretical cosmologist says that, were he to start from scratch, he wouldn't focus on physics.

NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Chemistry Research Roundup

Why are bed bugs so resistant to pesticides? How do whiskey, rye, and bourbon develop their unique flavor profile? What compounds in the natural world could be used for insect repellant or for treating AIDS? For the answers, we turn to the American Chemical Society conference. We'll discuss a few of the highlights presented at this week's meeting.

NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

World's Largest Volcano Discovered on Pacific Seafloor

Researchers discovered the largest volcano on earth a thousand miles off the coast of Japan. Tamu Massif rivals some of the biggest volcanoes found in the solar system. Volcanology researcher Kayla Iacovino discusses what this giant can tell us about the inside of our planet.

NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Food Failures: When Home Canning Goes Wrong

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow.

(SOUNDBITE OF POP)

BILL: Ooh, there it goes. Cool.

(SOUNDBITE OF POP)

LINDA: Ooh, I love it.

(LAUGHTER)

LINDA: It makes me giggle every time.

FLATOW: Oh, they're happy people. They're Bill and Linda, two home cantors on YouTube. If you can your own pickles and salsas and jams, I'm sure you, too, know that satisfying popping sound as your jars cool.

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NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

US Cities Quench Growing Thirst with Saltwater

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Ira Flatow. I don't have to tell you that the southwest is in the midst of a record drought, some 14 years in the making, which means the water supply for many Western states - California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada - is drying up. Last month the Bureau of Reclamation announced they're cutting the flow of water into Lake Mead, which has already lost 100 feet of water since the drought began.

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Parallels
11:08 am
Fri September 13, 2013

No Deal On Bangladesh Garment Factory Compensation Fund

A Bangladeshi woman holds a photograph of a relative missing in the Rana Plaza building collapse, as she participates in a protest in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Friday. Protesters demanded a minimum monthly salary of $103 and compensation for the victims and injured in the building collapse in April that killed more than 1,000 people.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 11:20 am

Families and survivors of the Rana Plaza garment factory disaster in Bangladesh in April who are waiting for compensation from Western companies will have to wait a little longer.

A meeting Thursday of retailers and brands in Geneva, Switzerland, facilitated by the U.N.'s International Labor Organization, ended with only one company announcing measures for the victims: Primark said it would give the families of victims three months' salary.

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Code Switch
10:58 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Money' And 'Canelo' Punch It Out For Black And Latino Fans

Floyd Mayweather and Saul "Canelo" Alvarez are at the center of one of the biggest sports events of the year, but you wouldn't know it by looking at mainstream sports media.
Anna John Stiff Jab

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:51 pm

Ex-jock talking heads aside, the nation's sports pages remain overwhelmingly white. That's probably why you're only vaguely aware that for many of us, tomorrow night is the one of the biggest sporting events of the year.

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Planet Money
10:33 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Jobs, Debt And Home Prices Since The Crisis, In Five Charts

Quoctrung Bui / NPR

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 4:00 pm

The housing bust started in 2006. The recession started in 2007. But it was in September, 2008 – five years ago this month – that the financial crisis hit its most intense moments. Here's a look at how U.S. households have fared since then.

Correction: The headline initially said "four charts." Thanks to the commenter who pointed out that there are, in fact, five charts in this post.

Shots - Health News
10:28 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Majority Of Millennial Kids In U.S. Generous To Charities

Jackson Merrick, a sixth-grader from McLean, Va., says he donates half of his allowance to charity.
Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 11:26 am

Millennials might be known to their elders for texts and tattoos, but they're also a pretty giving bunch.

Nearly 9 in 10 millennial kids in the U.S. gave to a charity at least once during two years the researchers asked about, the United Nations Foundation said Thursday. More than half of the kids gave in both years.

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

What Predictions From 1984 Came True?

Nicholas Negroponte at an early TED conference in 1984.
Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nicholas Negroponte's TEDTalk

Back in 1984, technology leader Nicholas Negroponte was able to predict, with surprising accuracy, e-readers, face to face teleconferencing and the touchscreen interface of the iPhone.

About Nicholas Negroponte

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Will GPS Change Our Standards for Privacy?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Todd Humphreys' TEDTalk

Todd Humphreys forecasts the near-future of geolocation when millimeter-accurate GPS "dots" will enable you to find pin-point locations, index-search your physical possessions — or to track people without their knowledge. And the response to the sinister side of this technology may have unintended consequences of its own.

About Todd Humphreys

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

How Personalized Will Medicine Get?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:16 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nina Tandon's TEDTalk

Call it extremely personalized medicine. Tissue engineer Nina Tandon explains how in the future, we'll be able to grow replacement organs from our very own cells. In the future, that same technology will help develop custom designed drugs.

About Nina Tandon

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

How Do You Predict The Future?

"I do spend time trying to think about what I cannot imagine" — Nicholas Negroponte
courtsey of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:16 pm

Part 7 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nicholas Negroponte's TEDTalk

How do you predict the future? Technology leader Nicholas Negroponte accurately predicted some of the most prevalent devices we use to day — back in 1984. Negroponte explains how he makes predictions with great confidence.

About Nicholas Negroponte

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TED Radio Hour
9:39 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Predicting The Future

Will the predictions of today turn into the reality of tomorrow?
Thinkstock

"I do spend time trying to think about what I cannot imagine." -- Nicholas Negroponte

Visions of the future don't just have to come from science fiction. There's very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future look like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how we might live in the future.

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Fri September 13, 2013

He's Down, Not Up: Trans-Atlantic Balloonist Forced To Land

Jonathan Trappe lifted off Thursday from Caribou, Maine. He had to give up his trans-Atlantic trip about 350 miles later.
Mark McBreairty AP

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 10:09 am

Before we even had a chance to tell you he was up, Jonathan Trappe is down.

"Hmm, this doesn't look like France," says the American aviator on his Facebook page.

Trappe left from Caribou, Maine, on Thursday on a bid to fly across the Atlantic in a small boat hanging beneath about 300 helium-filled balloons. Think Up.

No one's ever made that trip using a "cluster balloon" rig.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Top Stories: Indian Rapists Sentenced; Guns To Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:53 am

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Monkey See
8:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Requested Reboots And 'Duck Dynasty'

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

With intrepid host Linda Holmes trapped in the air-conditioned movie theaters of Toronto, the Pop Culture Happy Hour gang was forced to reconstitute itself yet again for this week's episode — this time with our old pal Tanya Ballard Brown, who returns via the power of popular demand. You talk, we listen, people.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Fri September 13, 2013

As Talks Continue, CIA Gets Some Weapons To Syrian Rebels

A Free Syrian Army fighter looks through the scope of his sniper rifle at an area controlled by forces loyal to President Bashar Assad in Aleppo.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 4:13 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Bowman talks with host Steve Inskeep about the crisis in Syria

It's Day Two of talks in Geneva between Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who are seeing if they can come to an agreement on Russia's suggestion that Syria hand over its chemical weapons to international monitors — and thus avert a possible strike by the U.S. military.

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