World

NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

World's Largest Volcano Discovered on Pacific Seafloor

Researchers discovered the largest volcano on earth a thousand miles off the coast of Japan. Tamu Massif rivals some of the biggest volcanoes found in the solar system. Volcanology researcher Kayla Iacovino discusses what this giant can tell us about the inside of our planet.

Parallels
11:08 am
Fri September 13, 2013

No Deal On Bangladesh Garment Factory Compensation Fund

A Bangladeshi woman holds a photograph of a relative missing in the Rana Plaza building collapse, as she participates in a protest in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Friday. Protesters demanded a minimum monthly salary of $103 and compensation for the victims and injured in the building collapse in April that killed more than 1,000 people.
A.M. Ahad AP

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 11:20 am

Families and survivors of the Rana Plaza garment factory disaster in Bangladesh in April who are waiting for compensation from Western companies will have to wait a little longer.

A meeting Thursday of retailers and brands in Geneva, Switzerland, facilitated by the U.N.'s International Labor Organization, ended with only one company announcing measures for the victims: Primark said it would give the families of victims three months' salary.

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Code Switch
10:58 am
Fri September 13, 2013

'Money' And 'Canelo' Punch It Out For Black And Latino Fans

Floyd Mayweather and Saul "Canelo" Alvarez are at the center of one of the biggest sports events of the year, but you wouldn't know it by looking at mainstream sports media.
Anna John Stiff Jab

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:51 pm

Ex-jock talking heads aside, the nation's sports pages remain overwhelmingly white. That's probably why you're only vaguely aware that for many of us, tomorrow night is the one of the biggest sporting events of the year.

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Planet Money
10:33 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Jobs, Debt And Home Prices Since The Crisis, In Five Charts

Quoctrung Bui / NPR

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 4:00 pm

The housing bust started in 2006. The recession started in 2007. But it was in September, 2008 – five years ago this month – that the financial crisis hit its most intense moments. Here's a look at how U.S. households have fared since then.

Correction: The headline initially said "four charts." Thanks to the commenter who pointed out that there are, in fact, five charts in this post.

Shots - Health News
10:28 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Majority Of Millennial Kids In U.S. Generous To Charities

Jackson Merrick, a sixth-grader from McLean, Va., says he donates half of his allowance to charity.
Morgan Walker NPR

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 11:26 am

Millennials might be known to their elders for texts and tattoos, but they're also a pretty giving bunch.

Nearly 9 in 10 millennial kids in the U.S. gave to a charity at least once during two years the researchers asked about, the United Nations Foundation said Thursday. More than half of the kids gave in both years.

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Will GPS Change Our Standards for Privacy?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Todd Humphreys' TEDTalk

Todd Humphreys forecasts the near-future of geolocation when millimeter-accurate GPS "dots" will enable you to find pin-point locations, index-search your physical possessions — or to track people without their knowledge. And the response to the sinister side of this technology may have unintended consequences of its own.

About Todd Humphreys

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

How Personalized Will Medicine Get?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:16 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nina Tandon's TEDTalk

Call it extremely personalized medicine. Tissue engineer Nina Tandon explains how in the future, we'll be able to grow replacement organs from our very own cells. In the future, that same technology will help develop custom designed drugs.

About Nina Tandon

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

How Do You Predict The Future?

"I do spend time trying to think about what I cannot imagine" — Nicholas Negroponte
courtsey of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 2:16 pm

Part 7 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nicholas Negroponte's TEDTalk

How do you predict the future? Technology leader Nicholas Negroponte accurately predicted some of the most prevalent devices we use to day — back in 1984. Negroponte explains how he makes predictions with great confidence.

About Nicholas Negroponte

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TED Radio Hour
9:40 am
Fri September 13, 2013

What Predictions From 1984 Came True?

Nicholas Negroponte at an early TED conference in 1984.
Courtesy of TED

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:42 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Predicting The Future.

About Nicholas Negroponte's TEDTalk

Back in 1984, technology leader Nicholas Negroponte was able to predict, with surprising accuracy, e-readers, face to face teleconferencing and the touchscreen interface of the iPhone.

About Nicholas Negroponte

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TED Radio Hour
9:39 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Predicting The Future

Will the predictions of today turn into the reality of tomorrow?
Thinkstock

"I do spend time trying to think about what I cannot imagine." -- Nicholas Negroponte

Visions of the future don't just have to come from science fiction. There's very real technology today giving us clues about how our future lives might be transformed. So what might our future look like? And what does it take for an idea about the future to become a reality? In this hour, TED speakers make some bold predictions and explain how we might live in the future.

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The Two-Way
9:13 am
Fri September 13, 2013

He's Down, Not Up: Trans-Atlantic Balloonist Forced To Land

Jonathan Trappe lifted off Thursday from Caribou, Maine. He had to give up his trans-Atlantic trip about 350 miles later.
Mark McBreairty AP

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 10:09 am

Before we even had a chance to tell you he was up, Jonathan Trappe is down.

"Hmm, this doesn't look like France," says the American aviator on his Facebook page.

Trappe left from Caribou, Maine, on Thursday on a bid to fly across the Atlantic in a small boat hanging beneath about 300 helium-filled balloons. Think Up.

No one's ever made that trip using a "cluster balloon" rig.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Top Stories: Indian Rapists Sentenced; Guns To Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:53 am

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Monkey See
8:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Requested Reboots And 'Duck Dynasty'

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

With intrepid host Linda Holmes trapped in the air-conditioned movie theaters of Toronto, the Pop Culture Happy Hour gang was forced to reconstitute itself yet again for this week's episode — this time with our old pal Tanya Ballard Brown, who returns via the power of popular demand. You talk, we listen, people.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Fri September 13, 2013

As Talks Continue, CIA Gets Some Weapons To Syrian Rebels

A Free Syrian Army fighter looks through the scope of his sniper rifle at an area controlled by forces loyal to President Bashar Assad in Aleppo.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 4:13 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Bowman talks with host Steve Inskeep about the crisis in Syria

It's Day Two of talks in Geneva between Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, who are seeing if they can come to an agreement on Russia's suggestion that Syria hand over its chemical weapons to international monitors — and thus avert a possible strike by the U.S. military.

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The Two-Way
7:19 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Book News: National Book Awards' '5 Under 35' Picks Are All Women

Amanda Coplin received her MFA from the University of Minnesota, and now resides in Portland, Ore.
Corina Bernstein HarperCollins

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 8:44 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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World
7:07 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Serious But Funny Discoveries Win Prizes

The lg Nobel Prize honors discoveries that are very scientific yet humorous. Winners include researchers who showed dung beetles navigate using the Milky Way. Other scientists proved that people who are drunk think they're more attractive.

Book Reviews
7:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Death And The Aging Hipster: A Tale Of Intolerable Men

Norman Rush's other books include Mating, Whites and Mortals.
Michael Lionstar Courtesy Knopf

What happens when hipsters grow up? Do they become less insufferable with age? Do they learn to contribute something useful to the society they've long scorned, and in turn were scorned by? Maybe they, like Norman Rush's deceased character Douglas, leave New York City and go live in a castle somewhere, work on secret projects for the Israeli government, get a trophy wife and raise a child who opts to worship Odin and live wild in the surrounding forest.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Atwood Imagines Humanity's Next Iteration In 'MaddAddam'

With her weird, wistful new novel MaddAddam, Margaret Atwood completes the apocalyptic trilogy she began with Oryx and Crake and The Year of the Flood. Like its predecessors, MaddAddam is a blend of satiric futurism and magic realism, a snarky but soulful peek at what happens to the world after a mad scientist decimates humanity with a designer disease. That mad scientist is the brilliant bioengineer Crake, whose story is retold in this novel by the Crakers, the post-humans he designed to experience no sexual jealousy, and to eat nothing but plants.

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It's All Politics
6:33 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Congress Searches For A Shutdown-Free Future

House Speaker John Boehner tried to sound optimistic Thursday that his Republican conference would find a way to avoid a government shutdown.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

There's a lot of searching on Capitol Hill but no discovery yet of a way to avoid a federal government shutdown at the start of next month.

Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor are searching for enough House GOP votes for a spending bill that could pass in the Democratic-controlled Senate and keep the government open past Sept. 30.

Tea Party-affiliated lawmakers are searching for a way to repeal the Affordable Care Act with the help of the Democratic-controlled Senate and President Obama.

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The Two-Way
6:28 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Death For 4 Men Convicted In Indian Gang Rape And Murder

Outside the courthouse in New Delhi on Friday, demonstrators gathered to call for — and then celebrate — the death sentences handed down for four men convicted in the December gang rape and murder of a young woman.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 9:44 am

The four men convicted for December's notorious gang rape and murder of a young woman in New Delhi, India, were given the death penalty on Friday.

"It took all of 90 seconds" for the judge to announce his decision and then leave the courtroom, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from New Delhi. One of the four convicted men "shrieked and slumped," while outside a cheer went up when spectators heard the news, she adds.

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