World

Parallels
3:08 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Too Much, Too Fast: China Sees Backlash From Massive Growth

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:25 am

At a time when much of the world is mired in economic torpor, China still enjoys enviable growth rates. Yet there's no question that its economy is growing more slowly these days.

Just ask Yan Liwei, a salesman for a construction materials company, who was visiting a park in Shanghai this weekend.

"The number of new construction projects is declining somewhat. It's taking longer for many of our clients to pay us what they owe," Liwei says. "Many small and midsized developers are feeling a cash crunch."

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Parallels
3:07 am
Mon August 12, 2013

The Complications Of Getting Running Water In The West Bank

Cement mixers in Rawabi, a planned Palestinian town in the West Bank, about 25 miles north of Jerusalem.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:10 pm

Four enormous water tanks sit high on a hill in the West Bank. These hold the lifeblood for Rawabi, the first planned, privately developed Palestinian community, about 25 miles north of Jerusalem.

After five years, the first neighborhood is nearly built. But developer Bashar al-Masri is worried, because when it comes to water, Israel controls the spigot in the occupied West Bank.

"We're about to have people move into the city," he says, "and we still do not have a solid solution for the water."

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Shots - Health News
3:07 am
Mon August 12, 2013

New Muscle Drugs Could Be The Next Big Thing In Sports Doping

Belgian Blue bulls look like they are made of muscle because they have a mutation in the gene that codes for the protein myostatin. In humans, as in other types of cattle, myostatin normally limits the number of muscle fibers that form before birth and then limits the growth of those fibers later on.
Courtesy of Se-Jin Lee and Alexandra McPherron PNAS

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:03 am

Research intended to help people with muscle-wasting diseases could be about to launch a new era in performance-enhancing drugs.

The research has produced several muscle-building drugs now being tested in people with medical problems, including muscular dystrophy, cancer and kidney disease. The drugs all work by blocking a substance called myostatin that the body normally produces to keep muscles from getting too big.

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Photography
2:56 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Haunting Images Chronicle 165 Years Of A World At War

An American soldier reads a letter from home, while taking a break from repairing a tank tread in Lang Vei, Vietnam, in March 1971.
David Burnett/Contact Press Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:46 am

D-Day soldiers landing on Omaha Beach. A naked Vietnamese girl running from napalm. A Spanish loyalist, collapsing to the ground in death. These images of war, and some 300 others, are on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., in an exhibition called WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath. Pictures from the mid-19th century to today, taken by commercial photographers, military photographers, amateurs and artists capture 165 years of conflict.

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Environment
5:23 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

The Algae Is Coming, But Its Impact Is Felt Far From Water

Chinese beachgoers walk by an algae-covered public beach in Qingdao, China, in July. The seas off China have been hit by their largest-ever growth of algae, ocean officials say, with waves of green growth washing onto the shores.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Algae blooms are green or red or brown, slimy, smelly and you don't want it coming soon to a waterfront near you.

Most of us don't give a lot of thought to algae until the furry-like monstrosity is spreading over beaches, rivers, lakes and bays, but gigantic algae blooms have become an increasing problem around the world.

The danger algae blooms pose is that they sap the body of water where they are growing of nutrients and oxygen; they then die, decompose and rot.

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NPR Story
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

South Boston Transformed In Whitey Bulger's Absence

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:23 pm

When the FBI brought reputed mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger back to his old stomping ground of South Boston to be tried in federal court after 16 years on the lam, he must have done a double take. The neighborhood that Bulger is accused of terrorizing with murders and extortion is booming. This story originally aired on All Things Considered on July 18, 2013.

Music
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Trumpeters And Troubadours: New And Old Music From Italy

The band Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino is leading the revival of an old Italian folk style called taranta, which has hypnotic rhythms meant to have restorative powers.
Daniela Cardone Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:53 pm

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NPR Story
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Honduran Street Artist Paints A New Image For His Country

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:23 pm

In Honduras, there's a masked man on a mission to change his country's violent image. He calls himself the Maeztro Urbano, the "Urban Master." By day, he works in advertising; at night, he covers city walls with pictures of weapons turning into balloons or fat bureaucrats spending money on art, not guns. This story originally aired on Morning Edition on July 23, 2013.

NPR Story
5:03 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Is Banning Doping The Right Choice For Major League Sports?

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:23 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden interviews sportswriter Justice B. Hill about how performance-enhancing drugs affect major league sports, and what the league can do about them. Hill says the best option is to stop banning steroids and other drugs, and instead legalize and regulate them.

The Record
4:33 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Hip-Hop Turns 40

DJ Kool Herc hosted a party in the South Bronx in 1973 that is credited with kick-starting hip-hop.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 6:09 pm

Today marks the 40th anniversary of the day Clive "Kool Herc" Campbell threw his first party in the function room of 1520 Sedgwick Ave in the South Bronx. While that Kool Herc back-to-school party marks the official beginnings of the global culture we call hip-hop, what the mainstream media at large now calls "hip-hop" is a far cry from the creative culture that emerged following the gang truce between the warring tribes of the South Bronx. When most people say "hip-hop" what they're actually talking about is rap.

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Author Interviews
3:39 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

'Dressing Constitutionally': When Fashion And Laws Collide

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:19 am

How short is too short, according to the law? Wardrobe choices, or lack thereof, raise all sorts of issues — from First Amendment concerns to questions of equality, sexuality and control.

Ruthann Robson's new book, Dressing Constitutionally Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, examines anecdotes throughout history demonstrating the ways fashion and laws can conflict or influence one another. Robinson talks with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some of those examples.

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Remembrances
3:02 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

How A Massive Power Outage Sent People Out In The Street

The New York City skyline is mostly dark in this photo of the 2003 blackout that hit U.S. and Canadian cities.
Frank Franklin II AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:38 pm

On Aug. 14, 2003, a series of cascading power failures led to a blackout that spread across the Northeast and as far west as Ohio. Some 50 million people were affected, and the power outages lasted up to 31 hours.

New York City was especially hard hit as the skyline went dark, and its 8 million residents coped without traffic lights or subways. We'll be exploring the lessons learned in the week ahead, but reporter Beth Fertig of member station WNYC reminds us what happened in her city.

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Reactor Powered Up On First 'Made in India' Nuclear Sub

A Russian Akula-class sub in Brest harbor, western France, in 2004. The INS Arihant is said to be based on this Cold War design.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 12:44 pm

India has activated the reactor aboard the INS Arihant, believed to be the first nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine designed and built outside the Cold War "nuclear club."

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh called the event a "giant stride in ... our indigenous technological capabilities."

It's the first nuclear-powered submarine built in India and the first such vessel constructed by a country other than the United States, U.K., France, Russia or China.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Family Rescued In Pacific After Sailing 'Where God Led Us'

The Gastonguays hoped to reach the vast archipelago nation of Kiribati, part of which is shown in this 2001 photo.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:59 pm

A leap of faith that sent an Arizona family bound for the South Pacific in a sailboat has returned them in an airplane after a harrowing ordeal at sea that saw them adrift and nearly out of food in one of the remotest stretches of ocean on the planet.

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Monkey See
10:12 am
Sun August 11, 2013

The Real Foodwives: Bravo Found Some More Rich Ladies Who Gossip!

Screenshot

The first person we meet in Bravo's new rich-white-ladies-fighting show Eat Drink Love is Waylynn. Waylynn is a pastry chef who has a store where she sells what she calls "fonuts."

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Israel OKs New Settlement Construction In West Bank

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat speaks to the media with Israel's chief negotiator and Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington on July 30.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:20 am

Israel's housing minister has given the green light to build 1,200 apartments in Jewish settlements in the West Bank, complicating newly revived peace talks with the Palestinians.

The decision comes as the two sides prepare for a second round of talks in Jerusalem after a high-level meeting in Washington, D.C., on July 31 — the first in five years.

The Associated Press writes:

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Sending Poetry To Mars

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, to a story I'll do entirely in haiku, so bear with me. And just in case you need a primmer: just three lines of verse. Syllables are what counts here - five, seven, then five. For the last few months, scientists have collected haikus meant for Mars. Thousands of poets, pros and amateurs alike, submitted their work. The public then picked their favorite Mars haikus. We are fans of these, by Anonymous.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Reading) Mars, oh. Do forgive. We never meant to obstruct Your view of Venus.

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

With Ice Cubes, The Larger The Better

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. It is August. Chances are where you are it's hot. So, maybe you want a drink to cool off. Will it be fruity or fizzy, maybe boozy? Whatever it is, Dan Pashman, host of the Sporkful podcast, thinks you may be overlooking one key ingredient: the ice. He joins us now from our New York studios. Hey Dan.

DAN PASHMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, ice. This seems like a fairly forgettable part of a beverage experience. You say, no. Why?

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

The Great Stories Happening In Baseball

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 2:09 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPORTS THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: This past week, the Yankees' Alex Rodriguez held a press conference. This was just after he'd been suspended by baseball for charges of using performance-enhancing drugs. There were a lot of tough questions about whether he'll ever play baseball again. And A-Rod made a valiant effort to deflect such questions.

NPR's Mike Pesca joins us now to focus on one of those deflections. Hey, Mike.

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NPR Story
6:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

A Powerball Winner Keeps His Feet On The Ground

Brad Duke won $220 million in the lottery in 2005. In this Weekend Edition's Sunday Conversation, host Rachel Martin asks Duke how he kept his money, his friends and his grip on reality.

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