World

The March On Washington At 50
5:38 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Sleepy, Southern And Segregated: What D.C. Was Like In '63

Charter bus passengers look for their transportation home after the March on Washington of Aug. 28, 1963.
AP

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Fifty years ago this week, when hundreds of thousands of demonstrators came from across the country to take part in the 1963 March on Washington, the city was not yet the cosmopolitan capital that it arguably is today.

But it was a mecca for African-Americans, says historian Marya McQuirter.

"Washington was definitely a different city 50 years ago," she says, "for a number of reasons. By 1957, it had become the largest majority black city in the country."

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Code Switch
5:34 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Twitter, Feminism and Race: A Roundtable

A Twitter trending topic kicked off a winding discussion about race and online feminism in which many women of color expressed deep frustration with the movement.
iStockphoto.com

Last week, we decided to start a roundtable about the collisions of race and gender in digital spaces like Twitter and the blogosphere. The conversation was sparked by the snarky-yet-serious Twitter hashtag #solidarityisforwhitewomen, which became a trending topic. Hundreds of people tweeted about their frustrations with influential feminist bloggers and organizations that they felt had pushed women of color to the margins in their conversations.

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The Salt
5:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

'Braai Day' Aims To Bring S. Africans Together Over Barbecue

Jan Scannell, former accountant, has taken on a new identity as "Jan Braai," a South African TV show host and media personality promoting the idea of National Braai (barbecuing) Day, celebrated each year on Sept. 24.
Courtesy of Stephanus Rabie

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Nelson Mandela is officially "improving," though still in critical condition at a South African hospital. His long battle with a lung infection has South Africans anxiously contemplating their "post-Mandela" future in a still racially divided country. In a unique strategy, one man is hoping to help heal those divisions with a pair of barbecue tongs.

Jan Scannell is a 32-year-old former accountant with a dream: To establish a national holiday in South Africa like July 4 called Braai Day.

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The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Which U.S. Agencies Have Taken The Most Furlough Days?

In May, the Housing and Urban Development agency closed for a day, as employees were placed on furlough. The HUD and other agencies were reportedly forced to take a fraction of the furlough days that had been threatened earlier in 2013.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 9:36 am

The threat of furloughs loomed large early in 2013, when mandatory budget cuts seemed certain to force federal workers to skip anywhere from 10 to 22 days of work without pay this year. A new tally by Federal News Radio shows that many agencies have taken fewer than half the days they had predicted.

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Shots - Health News
4:57 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Dengue Fever Pops Up In Florida

Dengue fever cases have cropped up in southern Florida.
CDC

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:31 am

Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne illness, is back in Florida.

A handful of cases have been confirmed in Martin and St. Lucie counties in the past week. The cases there prompted a public health alert. Another case was seen in Miami-Dade, where officials issued a mosquito-borne disease advisory.

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Strange News
4:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Finns Dominate Mobile Phone Throwing World Championship

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we wrap up this week's All Tech Considered with a story out of Finland.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This past weekend, 80 people from six countries competed in the annual Mobile Phone Throwing World Championships. The Finns shut out the competition, winning first, second and third place overall.

SIEGEL: The top tosser threw his handheld device an impressive 320 feet. The top woman on the field was a 31-year-old Swede - Asa Lundgren. Her distance: 132 feet. She's a newcomer to the sport but threw javelin in her youth.

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Latin America
4:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Months After Nightclub Kidnappings, Bodies Found In Mexico

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Mexican officials say they've identified five more bodies found in a mass grave outside the capital. The dead were among a group of 12 young people kidnapped from a night club three months ago. As NPR's Carrie Kahn reports, the case has rocked Mexico City, once considered an oasis from the country's brutal drug war.

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Middle East
4:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

U.S. May Fire Cruise Missiles On Syrian Military

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And we turn now to NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman for more on what the Obama administration might do in Syria. And, Tom, as we just heard in Michele's report, Secretary Kerry made the case today that Syria's government did use chemical weapons last week against its own people. Did he provide any evidence?

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Middle East
4:46 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Kerry: Syria Has To Be Held Accountable For Chemical Weapons

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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All Songs Considered
4:38 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Question Of The Week: Where Do You Stand To See Shows?

Ned Dishman Getty Images

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

U.N. Will Talk To U.S. About Spying Claims

The United Nations says it will talk to the United States about a report that it spied on the communications of diplomats.

Reuters reports:

"'We're aware of the reports and we intend to be in touch with the relevant authorities on this,' U.N. spokesman Farhan Haq told reporters.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Sabotage Prompts Two-Year Bans For Olympic Skater And Coach

Simon Cho of the U.S. celebrates during the 500 meter men's final race at the Short Track Speed Skating World Cup in Dresden in 2011.
Jens Meyer AP

"Obnoxious...disruptive...and...unsportsmanlike."

That's how a disciplinary panel at the International Skating Union (ISU) describes the behavior of former U.S. Olympic short track speedskating coach Jae Su Chun during a contentious international meet in Poland in 2011.

American Olympic medalist Simon Cho confessed last Fall to sabotaging the skate of a Canadian rival at that meet. Cho claimed his coach made him do it.

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The Two-Way
2:29 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Wingsuit Flying: Incredible Thrill, But 'No Second Chance'

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 5:30 pm

"There is no second chance ... there is no margin of error whatsoever."

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Parallels
2:11 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

What Are The U.S. Options In Syria?

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 5:01 pm

After long and costly U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, President Obama has been deeply reluctant to act forcefully in Syria. But reports last week of a possible chemical weapons attack in Syria appear to have changed the White House's tone. As NPR's Larry Abramson said on Morning Edition, the issue now appears to be "how to respond, not whether to respond."

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Tiny Desk Concerts
2:03 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Buika: Tiny Desk Concert

The Buika performs a Tiny Desk Concert in June 2013.
Hayley Bartels Hayley Bartels/NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 6:14 pm

Concha Buika's voice doesn't come from inside her petite body: It comes from Africa, and from the past. There are obvious traces of flamenco, itself a historical mash-up of the Moors and various transitory cultures in southern Spain and north Africa.

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The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Amateur Ko Wins LPGA Event Again; Says Goodbye To $300K Again

Lydia Ko of New Zealand reacts as she birdies the final hole to win her second consecutive Canadian Women's Open Sunday. Because Ko is an amateur, she didn't receive the winner's check for $300,000.
Stephen Dunn Getty Images

Lydia Ko, the New Zealand golfer who last year became the youngest person ever to win an LPGA event, has played her way into the record books again. By successfully defending her title at the Canadian Women's Open this past weekend, Ko, who's now 16, is the only amateur to win two LPGA events.

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The Salt
1:40 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

The Great Dumpling Debate: What Makes The Cut?

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 1:43 pm

When we first started thinking about dumplings for NPR's Dumpling Week, we presumed that there wasn't much to the little balls of dough. They seemed simple, universally beloved and unencumbered by controversy.

But the semantics of the dumpling turns out to be far more fraught that we imagined. This became clear when we started wondering whether tamales, or samosas, counted as dumplings. The deeper we waded into the pool of quasi-dumpling snacks, the more we realized we needed some expert input to set us straight.

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All Songs Considered
1:18 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Tom Stoppard's Daring 'Dark Side Of The Moon' Makeover

Posters of the iconic prism cover art from Pink Floyd's psychedelic masterpiece The Dark Side Of The Moon still adorn countless college dorm walls, 40 years after its release.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 10:51 am

Few albums hold a place in the hearts and minds of its fans (myself included) quite like Pink Floyd's psychedelic masterpiece The Dark Side Of The Moon. In the four decades since its release, it remains, for many, an almost sacred work of art, endlessly dissected by legions of fans dying to to unravel its myriad mysteries. What are all those background voices really saying? What does its iconic prism cover art mean?

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
12:53 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Debate: Does The U.S. Have A Dog In The Fight In Syria?

John Donvan moderates an Intelligence Squared U.S. debate on Syria at the Aspen Institute in Aspen, Colo. Those debating are: (from left) Graham Allison, Richard Falkenrath, Nicholas Burns and Nigel Sheinwald.
Riccardo Savi Intelligence Squared U.S.

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 1:19 pm

  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

While some American lawmakers have urged increased involvement by the United States in the Syrian civil war, so far the Obama administration has been reluctant to intervene in a major way.

The question has taken on a new sense of urgency following an attack last week near the Syrian capital Damascus that left hundreds dead. The Syrian opposition says it was a chemical weapons attack by the Syrian government, a charge the government denies. The Obama administration is now weighing possible responses.

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Code Switch
11:55 am
Mon August 26, 2013

A History Of 'Snake Oil Salesmen'

Made from the oil of the Chinese water snake, which is rich in the omega-3 acids that help reduce inflammation, snake oil in its original form was effective, especially when used to treat arthritis and bursitis.
Jagrap Flickr

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:01 pm

"Snake Oil Salesman." The phrase conjures up images of seedy profiteers trying to exploit an unsuspecting public by selling it fake cures. In fact, the Oxford English Dictionary defines snake oil as "a quack remedy or panacea." What the OED does not note, however, is that the history of snake oil is linked to an often forgotten chapter of Asian-American history.

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