World

The Two-Way
7:28 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Click Here For 'The New York Times' While It's Being Hacked

The New York Times' alternate site.
http://news.nytco.com/

The New York Times' website isn't working for us, and many other users, again this morning. As All Tech Considered reported Tuesday evening, the Times appears to be the victim of another hacking by the Syrian Electronic Army — a pro-Assad organization that has previously taken over the websites of other U.S.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed August 28, 2013

'Shaman' Takes Readers Back To The Dawn Of Humankind

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 1:15 pm

Big questions about the origins of consciousness and culture may not be everyone's cup of tea, but if these are things you find yourself thinking about, there's nothing like a seriously composed and compelling novel about prehistoric life — both for illumination, and for some of the most intelligent entertainment you can find.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Britain Seeks U.N. OK For Military Action Against Syria

British Prime Minister David Cameron, who says it is time for the U.N. Security Council "to live up to its responsibilities on Syria."
Stefan Wermuth Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 7:39 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Philip Reeves reports on the resolution Britain will put before the U.N. Security Council
  • From 'Morning Edition': Alastair Crooke on the crisis in Syria

Some of the latest developments related to the crisis in Syria and the increasing likelihood that the U.S. and its allies will soon launch missile strikes on targets there in response to last week's alleged use of chemical weapons by the regime of President Bashar Assad:

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Middle East
5:18 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Proposed Strikes Against Syria May Have Too Narrow A Purpose

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

A possible strike on Syria could move closer to reality today.

GREENE: British Prime Minister David Cameron announced that the U.K. will put a resolution before the U.N. Security Council, quote, "authorizing necessary measures to protect civilians caught up in the civil war there."

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Business
4:59 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Magazine Touts Arizona's Foliage Over Vermont's Colors

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: say what?

That was roughly the reaction of Vermonters who read this magazine headline. Quote: "Autumn In Arizona and Why It's Better Here Than It Is In Vermont."

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

You see, leaf-peepers, those are the tourists who head north to look at the colorful foliage, are a huge part of the state's economy. An estimated 3.5 million people visit Vermont during the season, spending some $130 million.

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Business
4:59 am
Wed August 28, 2013

JPMorgan Chase In Negotiations With Federal Government

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with settling suits for big money.

U.S. authorities are pressing JPMorgan Chase to settle lawsuits over bonds backed by subprime mortgages. And the Federal Housing Finance Agency is looking in the range of $6 billion to settle those suits.

JPMorgan Chase is still negotiating with the government. But here's another eye-popping number: The bank has spent about five billion for legal costs in each of the past two years. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Middle East
4:59 am
Wed August 28, 2013

U.S. Action Against Syria Would Further Inflame Middle East

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 12:05 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And now let's hear another skeptical view of the benefits of U.S. military strikes in Syria. Alastair Crooke has been a Mideast adviser to the European Union and also a British intelligence officer. He runs Conflicts Forum, which says it seeks to increase Western understanding of Islam.

Welcome to the program.

ALASTAIR CROOKE: Thank you very much, indeed.

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Middle East
4:59 am
Wed August 28, 2013

U.S. Insists It's Committed To Diplomacy In Syrian Conflict

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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All Songs Considered
3:39 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Okkervil River: Coming Of Age In Small Town America

Click to see an interactive map of Meriden, N.H., with stories from Okkervil River's Will Sheff about his childhood there.
William Schaff

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:15 pm

I grew up in a town of about 6,000 people in rural Kansas back in the '70s and '80s. I've never romanticized it much, though it was certainly a simpler time and, for better or worse, it's where I learned to make some sense of my life. The world you inhabit when you come of age in your teen years has a way of digging its claws in you. As the years pass, no matter how far you try to get away from it, it stays with you. The people, the places, the sounds and even the smells become a part of your DNA.

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Sweetness And Light
3:36 am
Wed August 28, 2013

How About A Gold Medal For Human Rights For Gay People?

A gay-rights activist chants slogans during a demonstration in front of the Russian Consulate in New York on July 31. Gays in the United States and elsewhere are outraged by Russia's intensifying campaign against gay-rights activism.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:46 pm

Let's see, now. That self-proclaimed fortress of liberty and fellowship, the International Olympic Committee, awards the Winter Olympics to Russia for 2014. After all, China worked out so well as an exemplar of freedom of the press at Beijing in 2008.

Then, Russia, duly a signator of the Olympic charter proclaiming the "preservation of human dignity," trots out an anti-homosexual law that would've made Ivan the Terrible have second thoughts.

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The Salt
3:33 am
Wed August 28, 2013

You Say 'Kubbeh,' I Say 'Kibbeh,' Let's Eat 'Em All Right Now

At the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, kids learn how to make kubbeh hamusta, a popular regional dumpling from Kurdistan.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 12:33 pm

People across the Levant love their dumplings, even if they can't agree on a name. Some say kubbeh; others say kibbeh. In Egypt, you might hear kobeba.

In Jerusalem, there are perhaps as many variations of the kubbeh as there are cultures in the city.

One popular version consists of meat wrapped in bulgur, then deep fried. Dip one in tahini for a crunchy snack.

But at the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, chef Udi Shlomi prefers to teach kids to make kubbeh hamusta.

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Kitchen Window
12:08 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Roasted Tomatoes, The Perfect Accessory For Summer Dishes

T. Susan Chang for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 3:31 am

At this time of year, we all love tomatoes. Many of us claim we'll "take a big juicy tomato and bite into it like it's an apple," although you won't often see that happen in actual fact.

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The Two-Way
7:17 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Scientists Say They've Confirmed A New Element

The periodic table.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 7:24 pm

Scientists in Sweden say they have confirmed a new, super-heavy element that was first proposed by Russian scientists in 2004. The element with the atomic number 115 has yet to be named.

In a press release, Lund University says a group of international scientists led by physicists from Lund University, made the element by shooting a beam of calcium, which has 20 protons, into a thin film of americium, which has 95 protons.

For less than a second, the new element had 115 protons.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

USA Swimming Faces Lingering Doubts Over Sexual Abuse

Attorney Robert Allard, seen here with former swimmer Jancy Thompson in 2010, says USA Swimming still needs to improve its handling of sexual abuse claims. The organization is also facing congressional scrutiny.
Ben Margot AP

There's concern the sport of swimming still may be dealing with a sexual abuse problem in the United States.

It's been three years since revelations emerged in the media. A number of in-depth reports in 2010 likened the situation in swimming to the Catholic Church sex abuse scandal: Coaches molesting under-age female swimmers; some of the abuse continuing for years without punishment.

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Movie Reviews
6:14 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Dark Wings Over Tokyo, With A Dash Of Feline Mystery To Finish

More than 20,000 crows, by recent estimates, live alongside the 13 million human inhabitants of Tokyo; Tokyo Waka tells their story — and meditates on the meaning of their persistence in one of the world's greatest cities.
Stylo Films

Western movies usually film Tokyo through a lens clouded by preconceived notions. California documentarians John Haptas and Kristine Samuelson sidestep that pitfall by downplaying human views. Their Tokyo Waka: A City Poem looks at the Japanese megalopolis from the vantage point of its abundant crows.

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This Is NPR
6:08 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

2014 Wall Calendar: June

Gaby D'Alessandro's illustration for the 2014 NPR Wall Calendar.
Gaby D'Alessandro NPR

Illustrator Gaby D'Alessandro has loved radio since childhood. At age six, she started her own radio show using a Fisher-Price tape recorder and cassettes that she gave to her friends and family.

And when she moved from the Dominican Republic to New York City, where she was one of eight million residents, D'Alessandro rediscovered her love for radio. NPR and Member Station WNYC offered "great company" and a connection to her new home.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Vaccinating Babies For Rotavirus Protects The Whole Family

An artistic illustration of the rotavirus.
petersimoncik iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 4:40 pm

A 7-year-old vaccine that has drastically cut intestinal infections in infants is benefiting the rest of America, too.

A study published Tuesday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that vaccinating infants against rotavirus has also caused a striking decline in serious infections among older children and adults who didn't get vaccinated.

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It's All Politics
5:35 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Impeach Obama! (And FDR, Eisenhower, Carter, Reagan, Etc.)

Michigan Rep. Kerry Bentivolio listens at a Nov. 4, 2012, rally in Livonia, Mich. The suburban Detroit congressman has said it would be a "dream come true" to seek the impeachment of President Obama.
Paul Sancya AP

Based on what we know now, President Obama is as likely to be impeached as he is to be a lottery pick in next year's NBA draft.

Yet it's equally unlikely that calls for his impeachment will end anytime soon. Adding fuel to the fire recently was Obama's old friend from his Senate days, Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who suggested Obama had come "perilously close" to meeting the impeachment threshold.

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World
5:29 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

U.N. Security Council Not Expected To Approve Syria Strike

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 6:31 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A strike against Syria will almost certainly fail to win the support of the U.N. Security Council. That is because of Russian opposition, and the Chinese also oppose it. Why are the Russians so determined in their support of the Syrian regime despite Western claims that Bashar al-Assad's army has committed an atrocious war crime?

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