World

Analysis
4:44 am
Mon August 26, 2013

White House Appears Closer To Military Action In Syria

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:14 am

President Obama heads into this week facing a major decision on how to handle what appears to be the use of chemical weapons by the government in Syria. At the same time, he's preparing to speak at the Lincoln Memorial on the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

Business
4:44 am
Mon August 26, 2013

First Female Member Of NYSE Muriel Siebert Dies At 80

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:02 am

Muriel "Mickie" Siebert bought a seat on the exchange in 1967 and was also the first woman to head one of its member firms. She died Saturday in New York at age 80. The cause was complications of cancer.

Business
4:44 am
Mon August 26, 2013

India's Currency Drops Following U.S. Fed Shift In Policy

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 6:06 am

The problems were triggered when the Federal Reserve said it would soon ease bond buying. Renee Montagne talks to Amy Kazmin, a correspondent for the Financial Times in New Delhi, about the troubles with India's economy.

Parallels
3:45 am
Mon August 26, 2013

For Pakistan And Afghanistan, Soccer As Reconciliation

Afghanistan and Pakistan, countries that have a history of tense relations, played their first soccer match in nearly 40 years when they met Aug. 20 in Kabul. Afghanistan (in red) won 3-0.
Omar Sobhani Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 5:03 am

Afghanistan and Pakistan are better known for their verbal fights and occasional border clashes, but for the first time since 1976, they battled on a soccer field in Kabul.

Some 6,000 rabid Afghan fans cheered on their team, clad in red uniforms. There were horns, flags, and face paint. It looked like any soccer game in the world, except for all the riot police, snipers, and Blackhawk helicopters passing overhead periodically.

Ahmad Mirwais, a 27-year-old tailor, was one of those lucky enough to score a ticket.

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The Salt
3:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

A potsticker prepared by Chef Scott Drewno at the Washington, D.C., restaurant The Source.
Heather Rousseau for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 9:35 am

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from?

No one knows for sure, but Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif., thinks dumplings have been around for a very long time. "Almost without doubt, there are prehistoric dumplings," he says.

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The Two-Way
3:01 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter near Dahla Dam, Afghanistan in July 2012.
Ho/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 4:04 pm

Update at 3:14 p.m. ET. Carter Receives Medal Of Honor:

Saying he represented "the essence of true heroism," President Obama presented Army Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter with the nation's highest military honors, this afternoon.

"As these soldiers and families will tell you, they're a family forged in battle, and loss, and love," Obama said, according to the AP.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Army staff sergeant who Monday afternoon will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony has mixed emotions.

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Around the Nation
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

The Howl Of The Eastern Timber Wolf

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's August, and that means a lot of us are looking for something out of the ordinary to do. And every August for the past 50 years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear the howl of the eastern timber wolf, once a ubiquitous sound in the wild. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.

RICK STRONKS: OK. How many people are here from outside Canada and the U.S.? Look at that. Amazing.

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Sports
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Quitting Your Job For Fantasy Football

Fantasy sports attract an estimated 36+ million players in the U.S. and Canada.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 6:04 pm

You may just call it late summer; for many die-hard sports fans, it's called fantasy football drafting season.

Fantasy sports is a huge business, with an estimated 36 million people in the U.S. and Canada picking teams and talkin' trash, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association.

And now we may be at a tipping point.

One man - Drew Dinkmeyer - actually left his job as an investment analyst to play fantasy sports full-time.

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Music Interviews
5:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Julia Holter's 'Loud City Song' Is A Story On Top Of A Story

Julia Holter's latest album is titled Loud City Song.
Rick Bahto Courtesy of the artist

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NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Oktoberfest Comes Early

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 5:08 pm

It's August, but you'd be forgiven for thinking it was October. There are masses of Oktoberfest beers and along with pumpkin ales and spice porters. With temperatures still high in most of the U.S., and the official start of fall so far away, why are we seeing so many fall beers on the shelves already? Jacki Lyden

NPR Story
5:04 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

World Reacts To Alleged Syrian Chemical Attack

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 5:08 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, a look at the minority Christian population in the Middle East. But first, this week, video out of Syria showed shocking images of civilians, many of them women and children, choking and convulsing on the floor of a hospital near Damascus. The opposition called it the evidence of a chemical attack.

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Middle East
5:01 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

For Arab World's Christians, An Uncertain Fate

The Amir Tadros Coptic Church in Minya, Egypt, was set ablaze on Aug. 14.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 5:16 pm

As Egypt plunges into unrest amid the military-backed government's crackdown on demonstrators, the country's Christian minority has been targeted by Islamic extremists.

Dozens of churches have been burned, ransacked and looted since the government began fighting against supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted President Mohammed Morsi two weeks ago.

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Books
4:52 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

In "The Nightmare of Siavosh," the young exiled Iranian prince dreams of his impending demise. Upon waking, he tells his wife, Farigis, about his fears regarding the tragic events to come.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:14 am

A thousand years ago, a Persian poet named Abolqasem Ferdowsi of Tous obtained a royal commission to put the ancient legends and myths of Iran into a book of verse.

He called this epic Shahnameh, or "Epic of the Persian Kings." It took him more than three decades and comprises 60,000 couplets — twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.

Author Azar Nafisi, who wrote the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran, says the importance of this foundational myth epic to Iranians can't really be overstated.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

If You Believe The Farmer's Almanac, Get A Good Coat

Snow sticks to the trees along Levee Road during a winter storm in December of 2012 in Baraboo, Wisconsin.
Tom Lynn Getty Images

If you believe The Farmer's Almanac, this upcoming winter is going to be pretty brutal for most of the country.

This is how Caleb Weatherbee, the pseudonym of the 197-year-old publication's official forecaster, put it in a piece today, announcing the new forecast:

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Ginsburg Says She Plans To Stay On High Court No Matter The President

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in October of 2010.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

In a rare interview, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she plans to stay on the court, no matter who is president.

Ginsburg, 80 and the leader of the court's liberal wing, spoke to The New York Times at length on Friday. The whole piece is a worth a read, but here two highlights.

On her potential retirement, she said:

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:00 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Seeing Music For What It Is

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 3:32 pm

Music is not sound art, even though musical ideas find natural expression in melody and harmony, timbre and rhythm. Music may be carried in sound, but only in the way that our applause at a concert is carried in sound. Applause is clapping; it is stomping and shouting. These are noisy, but they are not noise. They are not sound as a physicist might think of sound. Music is to sound as gesture is to mere movement. Physics is only part of the story.

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

New York A.G. Sues Donald Trump Over 'Unlicensed' University

Donald Trump, chairman and president of the Trump Organization and founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, delivers remarks during the second day of the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in March.
Alex Wong Getty Images

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is suing Donald Trump's for-profit investment school, "Trump University," which the lawsuit claims operated as an unlicensed educational institution for about six years and was essentially an "elaborate bait-and-switch" operation.

The New York Times reports:

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Ecstatic Voices
12:03 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Atheists Take Old Hymns Out Of The Chapel And Into The Streets

The Renaissance Street Singers give a performance at the Winterdale Arch, near the West 81st Street gate in Central Park.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 10:16 am

On a recent Sunday afternoon, 15 members of the Renaissance Street Singers gathered under a bridge in New York's Central Park. With little fanfare, they launched into a free, two-hour concert of music by Palestrina, des Prez and other composers who lived more than 500 years ago.

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The Two-Way
9:59 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Wildfire Near Yosemite Spreads, Threatens Ancient Trees

A firefighter uses a hose to douse the flames of the Rim Fire on Saturday near Groveland, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:01 am

The massive wildfire that's burning on the northwest edge of Yosemite National Park is spreading, threatening to destroy thousands of rural homes and also posing a threat to beloved ancient sequoias.

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NPR Story
7:45 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Far Out: Voyager 1 Might Be Over The Edge, Into Deep Space

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:29 am

For the past decade, scientists have been waiting for the Voyager 1 spacecraft to cross into deep space. New research suggests it has left the solar system, but other scientists say it's still inside the sun's sphere of influence. (This piece initially aired Aug. 19, 2013, on Morning Edition.)

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