World

NPR Story
7:45 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Evidence Points To Chemical Weapon Use In Syria

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You heard him mention his concerns about a possible chemical weapons attack last week outside Damascus. U.N. inspectors are being allowed to visit the sites in question tomorrow. Gary Samore worked in the Obama White House as the coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction. He explains that once inspectors arrive on site, they'll work to figure out what substance was used.

Read more
NPR Story
7:45 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Tens Of Thousands Flee Syria After Alleged Chemical Attacks

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:22 am

Thousands of Syrian refugees entered Iraq last week, fleeing the violence between extremist groups and Kurdish militias in northeastern Syria. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with Alan Paul of the charity Save the Children about the flow of refugees entering Iraq.

PG-13: Risky Reads
7:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Braving Both Napoleonic France And Teenage Angst With Aplomb

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 10:57 am

Fiona Maazel's latest novel is Woke Up Lonely.

The way my mom likes to tell it, I wasn't much of a reader growing up. My chief complaint of every book she dumped in my lap was that nothing happens. Ten pages in and no one had died.

Read more
Code Switch
5:44 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Books That Bring The Civil Rights Movement To Life

One of the must-read books about the civil rights movement is The Story of Ruby Bridges, about one of the first black children to integrate a New Orleans school in 1960.
AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 8:33 am

If you've been browsing bookstores this summer, you'll probably notice there are, in some places, whole tables devoted to books about the civil rights movement. The 50th anniversary of the March on Washington has focused national attention on movement history and most everything related to it.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:19 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Haitian Youth Illuminated In 'Sea Light'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:22 am

On her 7th birthday, a little girl named Claire disappears in a seaside Haitian village. Through Claire's fictional journey, award-winning author Edwidge Danticat shares glimmers of her own childhood in Haiti.

In Claire of the Sea Light, the protagonist's mother died during childbirth, and her father is a poor fisherman, struggling to make ends meet. Just moments before his daughter disappears, Claire's father had agreed to let a local woman adopt her in hopes of giving his daughter a better life.

Read more
Music Interviews
5:19 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Black Joe Lewis And His Band Stay The Course, Lose The Name

Black Joe Lewis' new album is Electric Slave.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:22 am

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
5:18 am
Sun August 25, 2013

It's All Greek To Me

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:22 am

On-air challenge: You're given some sentences. Each sentence conceals the name of a language in consecutive letters. Name the language. Each answer has five or more letters.

Last week's challenge: The Roman numeral for 38 is XXXVIII. What is special or unusual about this Roman numeral that sets it apart from every other Roman numeral that can be written?

Answer: If every possible Roman numeral were listed in alphabetical order, XXXVIII would be last.

Winner: Joseph Kuperberg of Pittsford, N.Y.

Read more
The Salt
5:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Dishwasher Cooking: Make Your Dinner While Cleaning The Plates

Food writer Dan Pashman says poached pears are great in the dishwasher. We're not sure about the asparagus, but we'll let you know after the cycle finishes.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:10 pm

My mom is a creative cook. And a darn good one at that.

But when she told me and my sister — way back in 1995 — that she had started cooking salmon in the dishwasher, we just rolled our eyes and shook our heads. Here comes a kitchen catastrophe.

An hour later, mom proved her teenage daughters wrong once again. The salmon was tender, moist and super flavorful. In some ways, it was better than her fish cooked in the oven.

Flash-forward 18 years, and dishwasher cuisine seems to be making a comeback.

Read more
The Picture Show
5:46 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

New And Returning Faces Reflect On The March On Washington

Gerald Bundy of Philadelphia was 13 when his older cousin convinced him to go to the March on Washington in 1963. Bundy returned 50 years later to celebrate the anniversary. When he looks back on it now he believes the experience, "made me more cognizant of social justice; made me an activist."
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:23 pm

Tens of thousands of people congregated in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom — one of the largest civil rights rallies in American history, and the day that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., delivered his indelible "I Have A Dream" speech.

Read more
Art & Design
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Hacker-Artist's Mantra: 'Fun Makes The Politics Go Down'

Artwork from Roth's solo exhibition "Welcome to Detroit," on display at Eastern Michigan University in 2012.
Evan Roth

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Evan Roth knows how to get a rise out of the people and organizations he targets.

Over his career, the Michigan-born "hacker-artist" has taken on Google, the Transportation Safety Administration, and — most bravely of all — Justin Bieber's fans, Beliebers.

Some might call him a prankster, a rabble-rouser, or an enfant terrible, but Roth prefers "hacker-artist" despite the connotation that "hacker" might hold for some people.

Read more
Law
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

N.Y. County Outsources The Job Of Monitoring Sex Offenders

Troy Wallace with his wife, Lynda. Wallace is suing Suffolk County, N.Y., contending its new sex offender monitoring law violates his civil rights.
Charles Lane NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

A suburban county on Long Island, N.Y., is taking a novel approach to monitoring sex offenders: It's giving the job to a victims' advocacy group.

The measure was approved unanimously earlier this year; lawmakers call it a cost-effective way to keep citizens safe. But a local lawyer calls it a "vigilante exercise," and convicted sex offenders are organizing to challenge the legislation.

'The Trackers'

Read more
Author Interviews
5:07 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

'The Blessing Cup': Polacco And Her Family Of Storytellers

Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Patricia Polacco has written and illustrated more than 90 picture books. Her young readers are drawn to her stories about family and growing up. She has won many awards for her illustrations, which are done in gorgeous, full watercolor. Polacco's latest book is called The Blessing Cup.

Polacco tells NPR's Jacki Lyden that early life had a profound effect on her work. Many of her books feature her grandmother, called "Babushka" in Yiddish, and take place on her grandmother's farm in Michigan.

Read more
NPR Story
4:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

It's Pandamonium Once Again In Washington, D.C.

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

We have a cub. The National Zoo made that announcement in all caps on Twitter at 5:32 p.m. last night. The zoo's giant panda, Mei Xiang, gave birth to her third cub Friday. Now there's a state of, wait for it, pandamonium here in Washington. Thousands of eyes were glued to the zoo's panda cam as the tiny creature came into the world.

(SOUNDBITE OF BABY PANDA)

Read more
NPR Story
4:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Remembering Ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain, Who Backed 'Justifiable War'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

Writer and ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain died this month in Nashville, Tenn. She was 72. As a very specific kind of political theorist, Elshtain was known as a realist, unafraid to talk about God. It made her a unique and influential public intellectual of her time. Rather unusually, she held a joint appointment at the University of Chicago in both the divinity school and the political science department. William Schweiker was Elshtain's colleague at the U of C, and her friend; and he offered this remembrance.

Read more
NPR Story
4:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

In Tennessee Jail, It May Soon Be Pay To Stay

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

If you do the crime, you do the time. But if you're doing time at Anderson County Jail in Clinton, Tennessee, it may get a bit more expensive. This week, lawmakers in the county passed a resolution that would charge inmates for basic necessities: nine bucks for pants, $6.26 for a blanket, 29 cents for a roll of toilet paper.

Read more
NPR Story
4:57 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

50 Years Later, A March On Washington Among Generations

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 3:55 pm

They came by the beat of drums: grandparents with their grandchildren, community organizers and activists, church members and college students.

Read more
Parallels
2:29 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

After 'Night From Hell,' People Of Damascus Ask: Are We Safe?

Men wearing masks walk along a deserted street that was hit by what activists said was a gas attack in the Damascus suburb of Ain Tarma on Wednesday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 10:32 am

The writer is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus who is not being further identified out of safety concerns.

Damascenes are shedding tears for the fallen and expressing fear and confusion in the aftermath of what could prove to be one of the worst chemical attacks in recent years. Residents are left unsure of how to protect their health in the wake of the incident.

Read more
Code Switch
1:56 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

While Unsung in '63, Women Weren't Just 'Background Singers'

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to the state's Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C., in 1965.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

On that sweltering August day in 1963, almost a quarter-million people thronged the National Mall, from the Washington Monument to the columned marble box that is the Lincoln Memorial. The crowning moment, of course, was Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Tons Of Molten Glass Go Into Making Mirror For Giant Telescope

An artist's concept of the completed Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)
Giant Magellan Telescope

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 4:08 pm

Technicians on Saturday are set to cast 20 tons of glass for the third of seven ultra-precise primary mirrors that will make up the 72-foot Giant Magellan Telescope, scheduled for completion in northern Chile's arid Atacama Desert in 2020.

The parabolic mirror will be cast at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. The molten borosilicate, made by the Ohara Corporation, will be spun cast at 2140 degrees Fahrenheit.

Read more
Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Sat August 24, 2013

Franz Ferdinand's Alex Kapranos On The Importance Of Structure

Franz Ferdinand's latest album is titled Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:17 am

Read more

Pages