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8:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Woody Shaw: The Last Great Trumpet Innovator

Woody Shaw made his first recordings 50 years ago at age 18.
Tom Copi San Francisco

Woody Shaw, who made his first recordings 50 years ago this summer, might be the jazz trumpet's least appreciated giant. Not among musicians, mind you; they recognize his genius whether they're horn players or not. Yet even hardcore fans often know Shaw's name more than his music.

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The Two-Way
7:45 am
Wed August 14, 2013

AOL CEO Apologizes For Public Firing

Tim Armstrong, the CEO of AOL.
Michael Kovac Getty Images for AOL

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:51 pm

After several days of brutal criticism and commentary about the brutal way he fired a man during a conference call, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong is now apologizing.

"I am writing you to acknowledge the mistake I made last Friday during the Patch all-hands meeting when I publicly fired Abel Lenz," Armstrong says in an email to AOL employees, which Mashable has posted here.

Armstrong adds that:

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Book News: Handwriting Offers Clues In Shakespeare Debate

Shakespeare's handwriting may offer clues to a mysterious passage in Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Sports
7:35 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilian Soccer Team Is Full Of Stars

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

What do John Lennon, Michael Jackson and Mahatma Gandhi have in common? You guessed it: They all play for the same Brazilian soccer team. The team is Atletico Goianiense. They just signed a striker named Carlos Adriano Souza Cruz. He's better known as Adriano Michael Jackson for his smooth celebration dances. Brazilian players often go by nicknames, even putting them on their jerseys. Just ask national team player Hulk. He's the one who looks like actor Lou Ferrigno.

Parallels
7:26 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Is The Middle East Conflict Getting Even Tougher To Solve?

Israeli-Palestinian peace talks were launched 20 years ago when Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left), Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat (right) and President Bill Clinton met at the White House on Sept. 13, 1993. But today, some of the issues appear more intractable than ever.
J. David Ake AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:23 am

When the Israelis and Palestinians signed an interim peace agreement on the White House lawn in 1993 amid soaring optimism, the Jewish settlers in the West Bank numbered a little over 100,000.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'March' Sheds New Light On A Civil Rights Hero

Courtesy Top Shelf Productions

While the cynics among us might argue that America's high ideals and lofty rhetoric rarely transcend their inscriptions on stone, few would disagree that the 1963 March on Washington was one of the nation's finest hours. It was a transformational moment, and a portent for future blows to segregation and injustice.

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Middle East
6:56 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Months-Long Political Crisis In Egypt Erupts Into Violence

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Security forces in Cairo have begun to forcibly disband two massive protest camps there. Supporters of ousted Islamist President Morsi have been conducting a sit-in for weeks amid threats of a government crackdown. For details, Renee Montagne talks to Michael Wahid Hanna, an analyst with The Century Foundation.

The Two-Way
6:44 am
Wed August 14, 2013

'Bloodbath' In Cairo As Troops Move On Morsi Supporters

Protesters taunt security forces moving in to clear one protest camp near the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo. The military-backed government described the camps as violent and unlawful.
Hesham Mostafa EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition' just after 10 a.m. ET: NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

(We most recently updated the top of this post at 5:08 p.m. ET.)

In what looks to be the bloodiest day since the July 3 ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, dozens of people in Cairo were killed Wednesday as government forces moved to clear Morsi's supporters from sites where they have been camped.

By evening, the ministry of health reported 275 people had been killed and 2,001 had been injured across the country. The government said 43 policemen had been killed.

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Middle East
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

After 5 Years, Mideast Peace Talks To Resume

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Middle East
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Security Forces Move In On Egyptian Protests

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

After days of tense standoff in Cairo, Egyptian security forces began clearing two sit-in camps by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi. The Interior Ministry, which is in charge of police, warned in a statement that the forces would deal firmly with protesters acting "irresponsibly."

Business
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Eurozone Shows Signs Of Economic Improvement

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with growth in the eurozone.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It looks like Europe's long recession is finally over. Statistics out this morning shows signs of growth across the eurozone after a year and a half of declining numbers.

GREENE: It will take time and stronger growth to reverse the high unemployment of many countries but politicians are hailing the figures as an end to the dark years.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley sent this report.

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Business
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Does More Vacation Mean Happier Workers?

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

August means many parts of the world are virtually shut down with many workers off on summer holiday. A recent blog post in The Atlantic took on the question: Does more vacation mean happier workers? Some data suggests not so much.

Media
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Tina Brown On The Dark Side Of Innovation And Progress

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Renee Montagne talks with Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast, for the Morning Edition regular feature, "Word of Mouth." Brown has three reads looking at the dark side to notions of innovation and progress.

Energy
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Complex Networks Make Up U.S. Power Grid

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And whether it's worth paying to avoid all blackouts is a theme that has been on the mind of Steven Weissman, he's a professor of Electricity Law at the University of California, Berkeley. We reached him on this blackout anniversary to learn about how the nation's energy system is structured. Weissman says the grid is really made up of several complex networks.

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Asia
5:21 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Rescuers In India Try To Reach Sailors Trapped In Submarine

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In India, rescuers are trying to reach 18 sailors feared trapped in a submarine that caught fire after a massive explosion in Mumbai last night. The defense ministry said at least some of those on board have been killed. This smoldering sub is in its berth at a highly secured naval base, with only a portion visible above the surface.

This incident comes as a setback for India, just as the country is trying to beef up its military. And for more, we're joined by NPR's Julie McCarthy from New Delhi. Julie, good morning.

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Parallels
3:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Brazilians Flood To U.S. On Massive Shopping Sprees

Camila DeSouza, a 17-year-old Brazilian, shops for shoes at a mall in Sunrise, Fla., on July 16, 2012. During their winter, Brazilians flock to the U.S., mainly to shop. Even with the cost of airfare figured in, many products are far cheaper in the U.S. than in Brazil.
Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald/MCT /Landov

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:26 pm

What's the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world? If you guessed in Mexico or China, you'd be wrong.

It's actually in Brazil, Sao Paulo to be exact. The consulate there is giving a record number of visas to Brazilians who want to visit the U.S. And that is giving a boost to the economies of cities like Miami.

On a recent day, Tiago Dalcien and his girlfriend stand outside the U.S. Consulate in Sao Paulo clutching their passports and other documents. He is a 30-year-old banker; his girlfriend is a doctor.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
2:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

The Vintage Cadillac With The Memphis Soundtrack

American Safari tour guide Tad Pierson stands beside his 1955 pink Cadillac. Visitors to Memphis can get a personalized tour that highlights the city's rich music heritage.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

In the town where I grew up — Memphis, Tenn. — Tad Pierson has made a career out of his love for cars and American music by working as a tour guide. We meet in the grand lobby of the Peabody Hotel, the downtown landmark famous for its ducks and Southern elegance. But it's also considered the starting point of the Mississippi Delta, a region steeped in the blues.

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Sweetness And Light
1:55 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Pete Rose Should Enter The Hall Of Fame With Ichiro Suzuki

Former baseball player Pete Rose at a boxing event in Oakland, Calif., on Sept. 8, 2012.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 9:16 am

In Japan, a noren is a short curtain that hangs to the entrance of a little teahouse or restaurant. It is not solid, but made of strips, and so when you go through it, your hand goes first, then your arm, and the rest of you, but quickly the strips fall back into place, and it is as if a wisp, a ghost, a sprite has passed through.

I always visualized Ichiro Suzuki that way, slipping from Japanese baseball to our major leagues so effortlessly, barely stirring the air.

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed August 14, 2013

In Maine, Lobster Comes Out Of Its Shell

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:44 pm

You might think a great benefit of living in Maine is unlimited access to fresh, cheap lobster. Most Mainers, however, probably eat less lobster in a year than tourists here consume in a week. Lobster bakes and boiling lobsters in those tall, speckled pots are grudgingly reserved for when company comes.

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The Two-Way
6:46 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Columbine High School Principal Says He Will Retire

Columbine High School Principal Frank DeAngelis at a candlelight vigil at the Columbine Memorial at Clement Park near Littleton, Colo., in April of 2009.
Chris Schneider AP

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 7:13 am

Frank DeAngelis, the Columbine High School principal who helped usher students to safety during the 1999 shootings, announced he will retire at the end of the 2013-14 school year.

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