World

The Salt
12:50 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Apparently, Some People Can't Be Bothered With Food

Nestle makes a range of products under the Boost brand marketed as liquid nutritional supplements or meal replacements. But nutritionists say they can't compete with all the benefits of eating real food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 12:37 pm

We're accustomed to offbeat food ideas here at The Salt. But even we had to pause over recent headlines about a guy who bragged about finding a way around eating.

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Young Staffer's Death Binds U.S. Embassy, Journalists

An Afghan police officer stands guard near the site where a suicide bomb attack took the life of five Americans, including 25-year-old Foreign Service officer Anne Smedinghoff, in Afghanistan on Saturday.
Arghand Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 10:50 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Remembering Anne Smedinghoff

Death comes with the territory when you work in conflict zones. On sometimes a daily basis, those of us who have worked in Iraq and Afghanistan in particular have filed stories with headlines like, "Four troops killed during insurgent attack," or "IED kills 10 civilians and wounds six."

It's a blur of numbers and uniforms. When we get word of an incident, we scramble to determine what happened, the nationality of the victims and any other pertinent details. But it's all very anonymous and impersonal, most of the time. It's reporting. It's work.

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Europe
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Young Greeks Find 'The Math Just Doesn't Work' Amid Crisis

"In Europe, we're trying to save banks by sacrificing an entire generation — my generation," says Marios Kyriakou, 24.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 4:23 pm

The latest statistics show Greece and Spain with the highest unemployment rates in the eurozone, both at more than 26 percent. For young Greeks, the numbers are much worse: Nearly 60 percent of people under 25 are out of work, a figure that is expected to rise.

These aren't just numbers for 24-year-old Marios Kyriakou, who was recently sipping a sweet espresso freddo at an arty cafe in his neighborhood. He says he's even had to cut back on that small pleasure.

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Europe
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

The River Thames, A Not-So-Secret Treasure Trove

Found objects from the Thames. Top row: a 1687 tin halfpenny, a Victorian clay pipe, a gold ring, a Victorian ring. Middle row: a decorated medieval button, a Victorian clay pipe, an 1830 George IV farthing, a Georgian military button. Bottom row: a Hooper Brewery stopper, a sailor's bag lock, a French Jacob pipe bowl and a child's toy clay pipe bowl. Note: objects not to scale.
Nick Stevens Thames and Field

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:45 pm

In the United Kingdom, British archaeologists have made a number of significant discoveries as of late, from the battered remains of King Richard III — found buried beneath a parking lot — to, more recently, a 14th-century burial ground for plague victims in London.

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NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Court Rejects Case To Ban Egyptian Comic's Show

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In Egypt, Bassem Youssef has built a following by making jokes about his own government.

BASSEM YOUSSEF: (Foreign language spoken)

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: That's a bit of sound from Youssef's satirical TV show, which often gets compared to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." His sharp critiques of the president and the ruling political party in Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood, have made him famous. But his show has also stirred up controversy.

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NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

New Strain Of Avian Flu Worries Scientists

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In China, authorities are stepping up efforts to contain the spread of a new strain of bird flu, which has killed six people across that country. It is the first time this particular virus, called H7N9, has been detected in humans. For more, Dr. Thomas Frieden joins us. He is the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He joins us on the line from his office in Atlanta, Georgia. Welcome to the program.

DR. THOMAS FRIEDEN: Good morning.

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NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Lianne La Havas: 'The Golden Girl Of British Music'

The singer-songwriter released her debut studio album, Is Your Love Big Enough, this summer.
Ravi Dhar Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

If you're open to possibilities and you're brave enough to take risks, good things can happen. Of course, it also helps if you're as talented as 23-year-old Lianne La Havas. One critic called the singer-songwriter the golden girl of British music. Another wondered whether she could be the next Adele. In this encore presentation, NPR's Elizabeth Blair has a profile.

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NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Pakistan's Tenuous Relationship With Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Afghans tend to blame Pakistan for just about every problem in Afghanistan. Yet thousands of highly skilled Pakistanis decide to brave the insurgency, animosity and poorer conditions to live and work in Kabul. They say that even when times are tough between the two countries, Afghans make them feel welcome.

NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

National Poetry Month: Poet Nick Friedman's

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Weekend Edition is celebrating poetry month by hearing from young poets about why poetry still matters. Today Nick Friedman shares some of his thoughts and some of his work.

NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Revisiting Afghanistan's Reconstruction Teams

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks to Kael Weston about the closing of the first Provincial Reconstruction Team in Afghanistan. PRTs are humanitarian missions run by military troops and civilians that built roads and schools. Weston spent seven years as a diplomat for the State Department, and says the teams have a mixed legacy.

NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Louisville And Michigan To Vie For NCAA Title

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Michigan beat Syracuse 61-56 Saturday night and Louisville also won a close contest edging Wichita by 4 points.The Wolverines play the Cardinals on Monday in Atlanta for the national championship. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks about the how the upcoming title game.

NPR Story
6:46 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Packing Up Old Memories At NPR

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

As NPR changes headquarters in Washington, D.C., and moves to a new building, a few hosts reflect on the mementos they've accumulated over the years.

Sunday Puzzle
6:06 am
Sun April 7, 2013

A Brand-New Word

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a well-known commercial name that spells a regular word or name backward. Identify the brands. For example, given "laundry detergent" and "work in a magazine office," the answer would be "tide" and "edit."

Last week's challenge: Name something in four letters that you use every day. Add the letters O, H and M, and rearrange all seven letters. You will name something else you probably use every day. This seven-letter thing is usually found near the four-letter thing. What are they?

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Author Interviews
5:28 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Stories Of 'Outside The Wire' Give An Insider's View Of War

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

In some ways, it was like any other writing class: backpacks, books, rough drafts, discussions about literature. But instructor Christine Dumaine Leche and her students weren't sitting in a college classroom or a community center — they were on an air base in Afghanistan and the students usually came to class after long days in a war zone. Leche was teaching them to translate their experiences — the danger, the boredom, the painful separation from their families, the fear and the hatred — into prose.

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Music Interviews
5:11 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Paramore: Southern Pop-Punks Tackle 'Real Life Problems'

Paramore is the pop-punk band's self-titled fourth album.
Pamela Littky Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

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Commentary
4:57 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Why You Shouldn't Wrinkle Your Nose At Fermentation

Kimchi is a traditional pungent fermented Korean dish made of vegetables with a variety of seasonings.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 1:08 pm

It's delicious, it's nutritious and it's basically rotten. Fermentation is a hot culinary trend, and, as Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf explains, the preservation process gives food a flavor unique to time and place.

People you know may intentionally be growing bacteria in their homes — on food, outside the refrigerator. And they are doing it to make food safe, and nutritious.

They are doing what cooks have always done: fermenting food.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:37 pm
Sat April 6, 2013

Vespers, Habaneras And Early Morning Walks: New Classical Albums

The Attacca String Quartet's latest album celebrates John Adams.
Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 6:52 pm

Robert Frost's famous poem "The Road Not Taken" begins with the line: "Two roads diverged in a yellow wood." Frost's traveler must choose between them. But slide that metaphor over to the world of classical music and you will discover hundreds of paths to explore.

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Author Interviews
5:18 pm
Sat April 6, 2013

How Twitter Star Kelly Oxford Makes Everything 'Perfect'

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 5:20 pm

Kelly Oxford is a little bit wicked and a whole lot wild and funny.

In no time, she went from being a housewife and mother of three in Calgary to Internet fame through her blog — and later, through Twitter, where her popularity exploded.

There, she shared zips like:

And:

Oxford's been retweeted by Jimmy Kimmel, John Mayer, and even the late Roger Ebert — one of her earliest supporters. Her secret? "The simpler they are, the better they hit," she tells weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden.

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Asia
4:55 pm
Sat April 6, 2013

The Extraordinary Lives Of Ordinary North Koreans

Amid a cascade of headline news from North Korea, often forgotten are the 24 million average citizens living under the most authoritarian regime in the world. Host Jacki Lyden speaks with Barbara Demick of the Los Angeles Times on the lives of ordinary North Koreans.

Animals
4:55 pm
Sat April 6, 2013

Spring Blooms, And So Do The Creepy Crawlies

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:49 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Spring is here. And just as temperatures begin to creep up, so do the bugs - all matter of creepy crawlies. Among the noisiest and, for my money, most repulsive...

(SOUNDBITE OF CICADAS)

LYDEN: ...cicadas.

MICHAEL RAUPP: My name is Michael J. Raupp. I'm professor of entomology and the bug guy here at the University of Maryland, College Park.

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