World

Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Teapot' Jackpot? Newlyweds Feel Fiscal Hurt In Dark Comedy

Temple gives Alice a sharp edge, but the character's persona wears thin by the end of the film.
Angela Graves Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 6:05 pm

In theory, it's romantic to watch young couples struggling. We're used to seeing 'em in movies from the '30s, '40s and onward: He makes only enough money to put beans, not steak, on the table. She stretches the meager dollars he brings home by whipping up cheerful curtains patched together from fabric scraps. They may be poor, but they have love on their side, and if they work together, a comfortable and happy life — including the babies that will eventually come — will be theirs.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Robert Redford Keeps Revolutionary'Company'

Jim (Robert Redford) must flee with his daughter, Isabel (Jackie Evancho), to the scene of a past crime in order to avoid a probing amateur reporter.
Doane Gregory Sony Pictures Classics

Crisp in execution and classic in ambiance, The Company You Keep is star Robert Redford's most persuasive directorial work since 1994's Quiz Show. It's a pleasure to watch, even if the payoff is rather less substantial than the backstory.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Trance': Crime Pays, If You Remember Where The Stash Is

Franck (Vincent Cassel), Simon (James McAvoy) and Elizabeth (Rosario Dawson) are uneasy allies trying to discover exactly what went wrong during a botched art heist in Danny Boyle's trippy thriller Trance.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

The rampant trippiness of Danny Boyle's movies is what makes them so enjoyable — and, sometimes, so annoying.

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Europe
5:02 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Emigre Artist Sculpted Exquisite Gems Of Russian Folk Life

Bosom Pals, an iconic sculpture by Russian artist Vasily Konovalenko.
Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

A team of American researchers is on a treasure hunt for jewels — of both artistic and historic value.

This month, researchers from Denver were in Russia to document the work of Vasily Konovalenko, a former ballet set designer turned sculptor, who created scenes from Russian folk life in semiprecious stones.

In the 1980s, Konovalenko emigrated from what was then the Soviet Union in search of artistic freedom. Now, his legacy is divided between the U.S. and Russia.

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Europe
5:02 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Britain's Class System More Complicated Than Once Thought

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The British have long mocked their own class system.

JOHN CLEESE: (as Commentator) Oh, it's certainly looks as though we're in for a splendid afternoon sport in this, the 127th upper class twit of year show.

CORNISH: Beyond "Monty Python," Americans have fallen in love with more romantic depictions of the vaunted upper class in TV shows like "Downton Abbey."

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Asia
5:02 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

North Korea Moves Missile To Its Eastern Coast

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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Asia
5:02 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

North Korea Blocks South Korean Workers From Shared Facility

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Earlier this week, we talked about the Kaesong Industrial Complex with a North Korea expert, Professor Aidan Foster-Carter from Leeds University. When we first spoke, Kaesong was still open, and the professor said it's the best bellwether to get a sense of North Korea's intentions.

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Remembrances
4:07 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

'Simple And Straighforward': Remembering Film Critic Roger Ebert

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 5:46 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Murray, we're just hearing that film critic Roger Ebert has died. The Chicago Sun Times, Ebert's paper, tweeted the news a few moments ago. Ebert, of course, an icon of film criticism, a one-time filmmaker himself, best known perhaps for his days on TV with fellow critic Gene Siskel. Their thumbs up or thumbs down rating system now a de facto review method of critics and filmgoers alike.

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NPR Front Row
2:49 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Blaudzun: NPR Front Row

NPR Music

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 11:08 am

The Dutch band Blaudzun had its work cut out for it at the SXSW Music Festival, as it somehow wound up opening for a March 15 showcase of Turkish music. But Blaudzun's songs are so undeniably infectious that, by the time the band played "Elephants" — the song featured in this Front Row video — the folks at Austin, Texas' Cedar Street Courtyard were singing and dancing to music they'd never heard before.

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The Salt
2:48 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Hello, My Name Is Porterhouse Chop. I Used To Be 'Pork Chop'

The name may be new, but we've been cutting the "porterhouse chop" for quite a long time
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 11:33 pm

Pork's most popular cuts don't have snazzy names. At least, not until now.

Coming soon to a grocery store near you are the New York chop, the porterhouse chop and the sirloin chop. Yes, pork is borrowing some of the nomenclature of beef cuts. Why?

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All Songs Considered
2:48 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Song Premiere: Emily Wells, 'Los Angeles'

Courtesy of the artist

Singer and violinist Emily Wells was one of our favorite discoveries at last year's South by Southwest music festival. Her 2012 album Mama was a surprising and beautiful mix of hip-hop beats and strings, with folk-flavored pop arrangements. Now Wells is back with a re-imagined, all-acoustic version of Mama, with the songs stripped bare and her voice more fragile than ever.

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Shots - Health News
2:47 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Researchers Use Brain Scans To Reveal Hidden Dreamscape

A window into dreams may now be opening.
Silver Screen Collection Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 2:57 pm

Scientists say they have found a way to get a glimpse of people's dreams.

"Our results show that we can predict what a person's seeing during dreams," says Yukiyasu Kamitani, a researcher at the ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories in Kyoto, Japan.

Philosophers, poets and psychologists have long shared a fascination with dreams. But Jack Gallant, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Berkeley says solving the mystery of our dreams is one tough problem.

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World Cafe
2:46 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Latin Roots: Argentine Rock

The Argentine rock band Los Fabulosos Cadillacs.
Courtesy of the artist

Today's Latin Roots co-host, Josh Norek, was given a hefty task: Define the broad swath of Argentine rock with just a few bands. But Norek, co-host of The Latin Alternative, is up to the occasion precisely because he spent time in Buenos Aires as a student during a vibrant period for music.

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The Two-Way
2:30 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Enron's Jeffrey Skilling May Be Negotiating An Early Release

Former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey Skilling outside of the Bob Casey United States Court House in Houston in 2006.
Johnny Hanson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 6:43 pm

Jeffrey Skilling, the former Enron executive serving a 24-year prison sentence for his role in the energy company's collapse, may receive a shorter prison term.

According to Reuters, the United States Department of Justice notified victims of Enron's fraud that they are currently in negotiation with Skilling.

Reuters adds:

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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems
1:55 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

New Mortgage Program Helps Cambodia's Poor Find Better Homes

Sriv Keng (right) and her husband, Vet Vong, dish up bowls of rice for customers at her roadside food stall, which is situated in a garment manufacturing district.
Will Baxter for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

If you've applied for a mortgage recently, you know how hard it can be. The bank demands all kinds of obscure documents and wants proof of almost every asset you own. But an innovative mortgage program halfway around the world will evaluate your application without any extra documentation — and if you're approved, it will give you a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage. There's just one catch: The mortgages are only for low-income people in Cambodia. The program is a throwback to the days when bankers got to know their customers — and trusted them.

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All Tech Considered
1:30 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

A Facebook Phone? Who Else Wants To Be In Your Pocket?

Fill in the blank: Tell us who else you think should make a phone, in the comments section below.
Giorgio Magini iStockphoto.com

Yes, April Fools' Day is SO three days ago, but we couldn't resist ...

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The Two-Way
1:24 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Facebook Phone Is 'A Family Of Apps,' Zuckerberg Says

CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Thursday's "Facebook phone" announcement.
Robert Galbraith Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 3:06 pm

Facebook is going to "turn things around," CEO Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday, by turning "your Android phone into a great, simple social device" that is "designed around people."

He came on stage just after 1 p.m. ET at Facebook's Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters to talk about a very poorly kept secret — the so-called Facebook phone.

But, Zuckerberg said at the start of his talk, "we're not building a phone and we're not building an operating system."

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Author Interviews
1:23 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Former Mormon Missionary Describes The Experience Of 'Elders'

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 4:47 pm

As a Mormon missionary, Ryan McIlvain spent two years ringing strangers' doorbells, even as he experienced doubts about his own faith. McIlvain left the church in his mid-20s. His debut novel, Elders, is based on the experiences he had trying to convert people to join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. "Elder" is the term used for a young Mormon on his mission.

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The Two-Way
1:08 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

The Sky Isn't Falling Over The Korean Peninsula — Yet

In this photo released in March by the North's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), leader Kim Jong Un is said to be using a pair of binoculars to look south during an inspection of army troops stationed on two islands.
Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 2:04 pm

Almost every day, there's some new threat out of North Korea.

It's hard to determine how seriously to take these threats. War on the Korean Peninsula could be catastrophic, so the bluster can't be dismissed. On the other hand, North Korea has a long history of hyperbole, of making threats it doesn't follow through on.

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Planet Money
12:44 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Video: Secrets From The Potato Chip Factory

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

For more on potato chip innovation, look at these five animated GIFs.

We took a tour of Herr's potato chip factory in Pennsylvania to find out how making chips has changed (and gotten more efficient) since 1946.

A note: Ed Herr says workers whose jobs were replaced by machines (e.g., getting rid of green chips, hauling sacks of potatoes) were reassigned to other jobs, like driving trucks full of chips to stores.

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