World

From Scratch
2:36 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Neil Blumenthal, Co-Founder Of Warby Parker

Jessica Harris speaks with Neil Blumenthal about how he is helping to change the optical industry by making attractive glasses more affordable. He's the co-founder of Warby Parker, an online retailer that sells low-cost vintage inspired glasses. For each pair sold, Warby Parker provides a pair of glasses to low income people in more than 36 countries through non-profit partners.

Later, we'll also hear from Israel Ganot, co-founder of Gazelle.

Law
2:24 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Experts: Prison Gang Reach Increasingly Extends Into Streets

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:47 pm

Prison violence is getting out of prison.

Authorities are looking into the possibility that white supremacist prison gangs may have been involved in a series of shootings of public officials in Colorado and Texas. If so, criminologists say, this would be part of a larger pattern of prison gangs extending their reach.

"Increasingly, these prison gangs are spilling out onto the streets," says Mark Potok, an editor with the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks hate groups.

Read more
Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
2:17 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Mose Allison On Piano Jazz

Michael Wilson Courtesy of the artist

Influential vocalist and pianist Mose Allison joins Piano Jazz host Marian McPartland for a set of originals, as well as a few favorite tunes by Duke Ellington, Hoagy Carmichael and more.

Originally recorded in 1988.

The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Pope Francis Calls For 'Decisive Action' On Clerical Sex Abuse

Pope Francis greets the faithful on March 31, 2013 in Vatican City.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Pope Francis told his staff to take "decisive action" when it comes to cases of clerical sex abuse of minors.

In a statement, the Vatican said the pontiff ordered the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith to "act decisively as far as cases of sexual abuse are concerned, promoting, above all, measures to protect minors, help for those who have suffered such violence in the past (and) the necessary procedures against those who are guilty."

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:10 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Coughing And The Meaning Of Art

Musical instruments wait for the arrival of the orchestra during the closing session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 12.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 2:29 pm

A few years back, I attended a Keith Jarrett solo piano recital at Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco. The hall, which seats nearly 3,000 people, was sold out.

Read more
World Cafe
1:53 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Jim James On World Cafe

Jim James' new solo album is titled Regions of Light and Sound of God.
Neil Krug Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:45 pm

There have been releases under the name Yim Yames and projects with New Multitudes and Monsters of Folk, but Regions of Light and Sound of God is the first album bearing Jim James' own name.

Read more
The Record
1:50 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Justin Timberlake And The AC/DC Rule

Brian Johnson (L) and Angus Young of AC/DC in 2000. Johnson's first album with the group, 1980's Back In Black, is one of the best-selling albums of all time, despite never reaching No. 1 on the Billboard album chart.
Michele Limina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:22 pm

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:48 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Lead In Soil May Be An Overlooked Threat To Kids' Health

Industrial cities like Detroit have high levels of lead in the aging housing stock and in soils. Researchers found that the amount of soil lead in Detroit that gets suspended in the air correlated with the levels of lead in kids' blood.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:43 pm

Lead poisoning in kids is hardly the problem it used to be, now that we've stopped using lead in house paints and gasoline. But the lead that lingers outside and in old homes is still dangerous if kids are exposed to it.

Read more
All Songs Considered
1:41 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Cayucas Spins A Twinkly Summer Daydream

Zach Yudin of Cayucas.
Courtesy of the artist

Read more
Planet Money
1:23 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

The Jobs Report Puzzle

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Lots of people are surely looking at today's jobs headlines somewhat puzzled, asking one significant question: How can it be that hiring was much worse than expected in March and the unemployment rate still fell — to 7.6 percent?

The answer isn't a happy one. There are a couple of ways the unemployment rate can fall.

Read more
NPR Front Row
1:09 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Ivan & Alyosha: NPR Front Row

Ivan & Alyosha win over new fans during a spirited performance at TenOak in Austin.
NPR

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 1:30 pm

Playing a free concert comes with risks. Sure, more people will show up, but they may care less about who's on stage than they do about catching up with friends; ironically, it often means the band has to work harder to win over the crowd. Seattle's Ivan & Alyosha did just that on the final night of the 2013 South by Southwest music festival, at a club called TenOak in Austin, Texas.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:34 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Puzzling, Shaky Start To New Round Of Iran Talks

The negotiating table in Almaty, Kazakhstan, where the U.S. and other nations are talking with Iran about that nation's nuclear ambitions.
Ilyas Omarov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 12:42 pm

The first day of the latest talks between Iran and the so-called P5+1 group about the Persian nation's nuclear ambitions has ended with reports of a "shaky" start and Western diplomats saying they are puzzled by what Iran brought to the table.

Read more
BackTalk
12:04 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Should Toddlers Use Tablets? Listeners Weigh In

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 12:22 pm

Host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar crack open the listener inbox for backtalk. This week, listeners weigh in on whether toddlers should be using tablet computers and other digital gadgets.

Hardcover Nonfiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of April 4, 2013

Girls Of Atomic City, about the Tennessee women who helped win World War II, debuts at No. 11.

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 4, 2013

When Women Were Birds, Terry Tempest Williams' meditation on her mom's journals, appears at No. 10.

NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Bees Emerging After A Hard Winter

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

After a winter that many beekeepers have described as particularly hard on their hives, Eric Mussen, extension apiculturist at the University of California, discusses the plight of the modern honeybee and the threats the tiny pollinators face from disease and pesticides.

NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

'Drunk Tank Pink' Finds Clues To Behavior

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

If you're looking for a date on Match.com, does it matter what color your shirt is in your profile picture? Or if you're trying to make a partner, you want to make partner at a law firm, yeah, does having a hard-to-pronounce last name hurt your chances? Does staring at a pile of money, even phony Monopoly money, make you more selfish?

Read more
NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Amyloid Proteins Help Paralyzed Mice Walk Again

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Reporting in Science Translational Medicine, researchers write that amyloid-forming proteins, traditionally thought of as enemies to the nervous system, may actually be protective 'guardians' instead. Study author Lawrence Steinman, a neurologist at Stanford University, explains how amyloid injections helped paralyzed mice with a multiple-sclerosis-like disease walk again.

Economy
10:43 am
Fri April 5, 2013

U.S. Job Growth Slows As Jobless Face Benefit Cuts

Applicants complete forms at a job fair in Newark, N.J. Weak U.S. job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 4:55 pm

The 11.7 million Americans searching for work got discouraging news Friday morning when the Labor Department said employers created only 88,000 jobs in March. The weak job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking.

The smaller-than-expected increase in payrolls was a big disappointment, coming after a long stretch of much better results. Over the past year, employment growth has averaged 169,000 jobs a month.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
9:27 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Monty Python's John Cleese Almost Explains Our Brains

YouTube

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:50 am

Read more

Pages