World

Alt.Latino
12:25 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

La Vida Boheme's Singer Picks An Essential Venezuelan Soundtrack

Venezuela's La Vida Boheme (left to right): Rafael Perez, Henry D'Arthenay, Daniel De Sousa, Sebastian Ayala.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 4:29 pm

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Shots - Health News
12:23 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

FDA Warns That 'Ninja Mojo' And 'Love Rider' Contain Hidden Drugs

The Food and Drug Administration says its tests have found undeclared drug ingredients in supplements marketed for the enhancement of sexual performance.
FDA

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 2:10 pm

Even before the Food and Drug Administration's latest safety warning to men about dietary supplements that claim to enhance sexual performance, there were clues of trouble.

The label for Ninja Mojo, for instance, misspells herbal as "harbal" and says buyers of it should "keep out of reach form [sic] children."

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Mountain Stage
12:06 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Rhett Miller On Mountain Stage

Rhett Miller performs live at Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 8:06 am

Rhett Miller appears here on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the West Virginia University Creative Arts Center in Morgantown. Miller has visited Mountain Stage several times over the years, both as a solo artist and with his alt-country band Old 97's.

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All Songs Considered
12:04 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

We Get Mail: Digging For Gems In Genres You Think You Hate

The Pistol Annies' Ashley Monroe recently released a solo album, Like a Rose, which helps stretch the boundaries of mainstream country music.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 2:12 pm

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Arts & Life
12:00 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

Muses And Metaphor: Egyptian Poet 'Spins A Word-Shaped Web'

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 12:15 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now the latest in our series, Muses and Metaphors. We are celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing poetic tweets - poems at 140 characters or less. And we've been hearing from famous poets and not so famous.

Today, we hear from freelance writer and poet Yahia Lababidi. And we'll let him tell you more.

YAHIA LABABIDI: My name is Yahia Lababidi. I live, now, in Silver Spring, Maryland. I'm from Egypt and I'm mad for short forms. Here's the tweet.

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World Cafe
11:39 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Jessie Ware On World Cafe

Jessie Ware.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 5:21 pm

Soulful singer-songwriter Jessie Ware is far from the first vocalist to make the transition from backing vocals to center stage; Sheryl Crow once backed Michael Jackson, after all. But the Londoner has made the leap with tremendous success in her own right.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:35 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Huberman's List: How A Violinist Saved Jews In World War II

Violinist Bronislaw Huberman in a 1900 photo, taken when he was 18 years old.
Augustus Rischgitz Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 12:25 pm

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Monkey See
10:43 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Putting Late Night In Perspective: Under The Massive Boot Of Judge Judy

Judge Judy Sheindlin, seen here in 2006, presides over a case as bailiff Petri Hawkins Byrd listens.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 2:36 pm

While we go on about the Johnnys, Jimmys, Daves, Jays, Conans, and additional Jimmys of the late-night wars, where was Joe? Specifically, where was the enormous media coverage of the end of Judge Joe Brown?

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Shots - Health News
10:28 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Change In Donors Is Remaking Global Giving

Bill Gates watches as a child is vaccinated at the Ahentia Health Centre in Ghana in March.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 1:06 pm

The face of international aid for health and development is changing.

Less money is now coming from wealthy, industrialized nations and more is flowing from private foundations, corporations and even countries that only a few years ago were recipients themselves.

First, let's be clear. The United States government, through the U.S. Agency for International Development, remains the largest donor on the planet — doling out more than $30 billion each year.

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The Two-Way
10:12 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Why Can Lance Armstrong Race At A Swim Meet?

Lance Armstrong warms up for the swimming leg of the 2011 Xterra World Championship triathlon in Kapalua, Hawaii (before he was banned from most competitions). This weekend, he'll swim in a Texas meet for masters swimmers.
Hugh Gentry Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 11:27 am

Update at 11:15 a.m. ET. Armstrong Pulls Out:

After an objection was raised Thursday by FINA, swimming's international governing body, Lance Armstrong has withdrawn from a masters swim meet being held this weekend in Austin, Texas, The Associated Press and other news outlets are reporting.

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Planet Money
10:03 am
Thu April 4, 2013

23 Million Americans Are Unemployed Or Underemployed

Lam Thuy Vo /NPR

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:31 am

The economy added 88,000 jobs last month, according to today's disappointing jobs report. That's not even enough to keep up with population growth.

As of March, 11.7 million people were unemployed. But that number doesn't include people who were working part time because they couldn't find a full-time job. It also doesn't include people who wanted a job but haven't looked for work in the past four weeks.

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All Songs Considered
9:51 am
Thu April 4, 2013

First Watch: Junip, "Your Life, Your Call"

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:40 am

I love the crazy surprises you get when two or more artists get together and turn their creative ideas over to one another. When the band Junip wrote the song "Your Life, Your Call," frontman José González says, it was meant to be an unambiguous meditation on growing up, moving on and taking responsibility for your life. But in the hands of video director Mikel Cee Karlsson, the song, from Junip's new self-titled album, takes on a whole new (and disturbing) meaning.

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The Two-Way
8:56 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Book News: Hillary Clinton's New Memoir To Cover Arab Spring, Killing Of Bin Laden

Former U.S. Secretary of State — and much-speculated about 2016 presidential candidate? — Hillary Clinton.
Astrid Riecken Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
8:46 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Jobless Claims Rise; Employment Report Likely To Show Slow Job Growth

Will there be more signs like this? An automotive service shop in El Cerrito, Calif., was looking for workers last month.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:24 am

There were 385,000 first-time claims for unemployment insurance last week, up by 28,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

The news follows Wednesday's report of slower-than-expected job growth in the private sector: The ADP National Employment Report estimated that businesses added just 158,000 jobs last month.

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Planet Money
8:33 am
Thu April 4, 2013

50 Years Of Potato Chip Innovation, In 5 Animated GIFS

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 1:02 pm

For more, watch our video: Secrets From A Potato Chip Factory.

Americans spend less on groceries than they did a few decades ago. That's partly because of new machines and technology that have made it much cheaper to produce food.

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The Two-Way
8:18 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Top Stories: Conn. Gun Law; North Korea's Threats; Rutgers Firing

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:20 am

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Thu April 4, 2013

North Korea Moves Missile, Threatens To Close Factories Used By South

On Thursday, a South Korean security guard kept watch as South Korean trucks waited to enter the Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea. For the second day, the North blocked the trucks and workers from the South from entering its territory.
Kim Hong-ji Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 2:02 pm

Bear in mind that, as NPR's Louisa Lim has said, North Korea's regime is skilled at making threats. And fortunately, the most ominous of those threats have not been followed by action in recent decades.

With those caveats in mind, here are Thursday's developments in the latest round of provocative moves by the communist state. From Beijing, Louisa tells our Newscast Desk that:

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History
7:17 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Cat From Middle Ages Leaves Mark On History

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Here's an old saying: Feed and love a dog, and the dog thinks you must be God. Feed and love a cat, and the cat thinks, hey, I must be God. A cat from the Middle Ages apparently demanded attention. A researcher was recently studying a manuscript from 1445 in Croatia, and that researcher discovered paw prints. Apparently, a scribe was working in 1445 when the cat stepped in ink, and then stood with all four paws on the work in progress. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
7:10 am
Thu April 4, 2013

New Zealand Movie Goer Notices Lack Of Explosions

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

The action film "Jack Reacher" hit theaters in December, and it got some favorable reviews. But one New Zealand moviegoer didn't think it was action-packed enough. That's because the trailer featured an explosion that wasn't in the movie. Disappointed, the man complained to the Advertising Standards Authority. He said the explosion was one of the main reasons he went to see the flick in the first place. Paramount Pictures has now offered to refund the money for his ticket.

Africa
5:24 am
Thu April 4, 2013

South Africans: Why Were Paratroopers In Central African Republic?

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

South Africa says its military is done trying to police another African country. Late last night, South Africans said they would withdraw their small military force from the Central African Republic. Ten days ago, rebels advanced on the capital of that country and killed 13 South African paratroopers. That prompted many South Africans to ask why the soldiers were there at all. The question here is whether the troops were protecting business interests linked to South Africa's governing party.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports.

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