World

Same-Sex Marriage And The Supreme Court
2:36 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

How Vermont's 'Civil' War Fueled The Gay Marriage Movement

Demonstrators protest outside the Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt., in April 2000, the month the nation's first law recognizing same-sex civil unions was signed by the governor.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 9:55 pm

It wasn't so long ago that a handful of Vermont legislators in a shabby Statehouse committee room struggled over what to call their proposal to give marriage-like rights to the state's gay and lesbian residents.

Democrat Howard Dean, governor at the time, had already made clear he'd veto any legislation labeled "marriage." Suggestions like "domestic partner relationship" were too clunky; "civil accord," they decided, evoked a car model.

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Sports
2:24 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

March Madness: Good For Fans, Bad For Business

Pittsburgh fans try to distract Wichita State's Ron Baker as he shoots a free throw during a second-round game in the NCAA college basketball tournament in Salt Lake City on Thursday. The distractions of the tournament are so great that worker productivity suffers.
George Frey AP

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 6:34 pm

March Madness is here. Even President Obama has filled out a NCAA Division I men's college basketball tournament bracket. His pick to win it all was Indiana University.

The bracket frenzy is unbelievable, says Deborah Stroman, who teaches sports administration at the University of North Carolina.

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All Tech Considered
12:43 pm
Sat March 23, 2013

The Cicadas Are Coming! Crowdsourcing An Underground Movement

Cicadas live underground and emerge in 13- or 17-year cycles.
Stephen Jaffe AFP/Getty Images

Back in 1996, a group of baby cicadas burrowed into soils in the eastern U.S. to lead a quiet life of constant darkness and a diet of roots. Now at the ripe age of 17, those little cicadas are all grown up and it's time to molt, procreate and die while annoying a few million humans with their constant chirping in the process.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Who's Bill This Time?

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

Bill Kurtis reads three quotes from the week's news: Leave the gun, take the baklava; Extreme Makeover: GOP; Who's the Dodo now?

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

More questions for the panel: Bazooka parenting, A Cure for Mornings

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Panel Round One

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everyone to join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium, and don't miss our May 2nd cinecast event, where you can see WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! live at your local movie theater. We've got Paula Poundstone, Mo Rocca, Tom Bodett and America's sweetheart, Mr. Carl Kasell.

Tickets are going fast. For information, go to wbez.org, and you can find a link at our website waitwait.npr.org. Right now, panel, time for you answer some questions about this week's news.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Coming up, it's Lightning Fill in the Blank, but first it's the game where you have to listen for the rhyme. If you'd like to play on air, call or leave a message at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924. Or you can click the contact us link on our website waitwait.npr.org.

There you can find out about attending our weekly live shows here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in Chicago. And check out our How to do Everything podcast. This week: Ian and Mike help a first grader realize his dream of becoming the world's greatest armpit farter.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now on to our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our panelists now has 60 seconds to answer as many fill in the blank questions as they can; each correct answer now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

BILL KURTIS: Charlie and Amy have three and Tom has two.

SAGAL: OK, Tom, you're in third place. You're up first. The clock will start when I begin your first question. Fill in the blank. Senator Harry Reid said this week that he is leaving the blank ban out of his gun violence bill.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

Our panelists tell three stories about creative justice for criminals.

Fresh Air Weekend
9:03 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Emily Rapp, Phil Spector, Philip Roth And Sea Chanteys

Emily Rapp is also the author of Poster Child, about a congenital birth defect that led to the amputation of her leg when she was a child, and about how she subsequently became a poster child for the March of Dimes.
Anne Staveley Penguin Press

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 10:52 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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NPR Story
7:57 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Nigeria Mourns The Loss Of Chinua Achebe

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 8:13 am

Award-winning author Chinua Achebe, sometimes described as the grandfather of modern African literature, died this week at age 82. Host Scott Simon speaks with NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton in Lagos, Nigeria.

NPR Story
7:57 am
Sat March 23, 2013

From One Author To Another, Letters Of Praise

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 8:13 am

Host Scott Simon reads some of the best fan mail to authors, written by authors.

NPR Story
7:57 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Obama Leaves Middle East With Mixed Reviews

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:26 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. And President Obama heads home from the Middle East today after a mixed reception to his four-day visit. Mr. Obama spent much of that time in Israel trying to lay the groundwork to revive the long-stalled peace process with Palestinians. He also traveled to the West Bank and met with Jordan's King Abdullah. NPR's Scott Horsley has a recap.

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Music Interviews
6:25 am
Sat March 23, 2013

The Milk Carton Kids: At Life's Crossroads, A Duo Looks Both Ways

Kenneth Pattengale (left) and Joey Ryan, who record as The Milk Carton Kids. Their new album is called The Ash & Clay.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:28 am

Kenneth Pattengale and Joey Ryan were doing just fine as solo performers. Then one night, Ryan walked into a bar where Pattengale was playing.

"I heard Kenneth perform a song that he had written from the perspective of a dead dog, only very recently having been hit by a truck," Ryan says, wryly. "And it was that sort of uplifting material that drew us together."

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Middle East
6:24 am
Sat March 23, 2013

In Saudi Arabia, Shiite Muslims Challenge Ban On Protests

Anti-riot police face off with protesters in Saudi Arabia's eastern city of Qatif on March 11, 2011. Despite bans on the demonstrations, Shiite Muslims in the eastern part of the country have continued to stage protests, demanding political changes.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 4:27 pm

Editor's note: When Arab Spring protests broke out in Saudi Arabia in 2011, the government reacted quickly, pumping $130 billion into the economy and cracking down on dissent. While this approach has worked in some cities, the Shiite Muslims in the Eastern Province continued to demonstrate. Reese Erlich, on assignment for GlobalPost and NPR, managed to get into the city of Qatif and meet with protest leaders.

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Author Interviews
6:24 am
Sat March 23, 2013

'Z' Tells The Fitzgeralds' Story From Zelda's Point Of View

St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 8:13 am

F. Scott Fitzgerald first saw his future wife from across a crowded room at a country club dance in Montgomery, Ala., where he was in basic training and she was waiting to be discovered by the world. They wed in 1920, and the two went on to have a famously turbulent marriage — tarnished by personal and professional jealousy, alcohol abuse and mental illness — which they both immortalized in their writing.

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Movie Interviews
6:23 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Maori-Mentored, Soul-Singing Mom Inspired 'The Sapphires'

In The Sapphires, an R&B-loving musician helps turn four Australian aboriginal women into a soul act. From left: Julie (Jessica Mauboy), Cynthia (Miranda Tapsell), Gail (Deborah Mailman) and Kay (Shari Sebbens).
The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 8:13 am

In the late 1960s, an all-girl singing group hit it big. But they didn't come from Detroit or Memphis — the four young aboriginal women hailed from the Australian Outback.

At the time, aboriginal people were just gaining basic civil rights, like voting and being counted as Australian citizens. The girls faced intense racism at home, but they took their act all the way to Vietnam to entertain American troops.

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Author Interviews
6:23 am
Sat March 23, 2013

At 80, Philip Roth Reflects On Life, Literature And The Beauty Of Naps

The Library of America recently published the ninth and final volume of a complete collection of Philip Roth's works, and a new documentary on PBS looks back on his prolific career.
Courtesy PBS

Originally published on Sat March 23, 2013 1:01 pm

Philip Roth turned 80 years old this week, and his hometown of Newark, N.J. — a city he left long ago, but often returns to in his books — honored the man often acclaimed as America's greatest living novelist with a marching band, a birthday cake in the shape of books piled high and lots of symposia.

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Sat March 23, 2013

Coal And Coral: Australia's Self-Destructive Paradox

The city of Gladstone near the Great Barrier Reef is the world's fourth largest coal-export hub. Dredges, like one seen here, have turned the harbor brown as they work to expand the coal port.
Richard Harris NPR

NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris traveled to Australia's Great Barrier Reef to find out how the coral reefs are coping with increased water temperature and increasing ocean acidity, brought about by our burning of fossil fuels. Day 5: A return to shore finds that people prefer cars to corals.

It's not every day you open an in-flight magazine and read an ad touting "spitwater pressure cleaners for the mining industry." Flip the page and you'll also see an ad cajoling you to "snorkel, sip, snooze" on the Great Barrier Reef.

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Favorite Sessions
1:02 am
Sat March 23, 2013

The Milk Carton Kids: A Heartwarming Hit

The Milk Carton Kids.
Folk Alley

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 10:13 am

Listening to The Milk Carton Kids on an album is one thing; watching the band work its magic live is another. This performance of "Hope of a Lifetime," the opening song on The Ash & Clay, was filmed at the Folk Alliance conference in Toronto. With its elegantly phrased messages about growth and the complexity of progress, "Hope of a Lifetime" moves delicately and thoughtfully.

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