World

All Tech Considered
5:28 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Amazon Enters Art World; Galleries Say They Aren't Worried

Amazon said its new art marketplace will provide access to more than 40,000 works of art from at least 150 galleries and dealers.
Amazon.com

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:35 am

Local record and book shops have been disappearing as the market for music and literature moves online. In the past few years, there's been a growth in sites that sell fine art on the Internet. On Tuesday, Amazon joined that market. But in this case, many brick and mortar galleries aren't seeing the Internet as a threat.

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Middle East
5:24 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Security Heightened In Yemeni Capital Sanaa

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 6:45 am

Tanks and troops are in the streets of Yemen's capital, Sanaa, as reports of possible terrorist strikes closed the U.S. and British embassies there. On Tuesday, the U.S. government advised American citizens in Yemen to leave immediately. For a view inside the capital, Renee Montagne talks to Iona Craig, a correspondent for The Times of London and one of the few remaining western journalists still there.

Business
5:24 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Tensions Flare Over Rock Of Gibraltar

Once again, Spain and Britain are at odds over a tiny limestone peninsula at Europe's southern tip — Gibraltar. It's physically attached to Spain but has been a British territory for 300 years. Now some Spaniards want it back.

Middle East
5:24 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Culture War Rages In Egypt

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 6:47 am

What is the cultural impact of a revolution? Egyptian artists, writers and comedians are sorting through what they can and can't express now that the Morsi government has been pushed from power and the military is in charge.

Law
4:22 am
Wed August 7, 2013

With Holder In The Lead, Sentencing Reform Gains Momentum

Attorney General Eric Holder is calling for significant changes to the way the nation deals with convicted criminals. And he's not alone.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:21 am

Sit down with the attorney general to ask him about his priorities, as NPR did earlier this year, and he'll talk about voting rights and national security. But if you listen a bit longer, Eric Holder gets to this: "I think there are too many people in jail for too long, and for not necessarily good reasons."

This is the nation's top law enforcement officer calling for a sea change in the criminal justice system. And he's not alone.

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Africa
4:21 am
Wed August 7, 2013

For Ethiopian Women, Construction Jobs Offer A Better Life

Mekedes Getachew, 19, has been working at construction sites in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, since she was 15 years old. Except for the heaviest lifting, she says, the laborers "all do the same work and we don't really say this is a man's job, but when it comes to salary there's a difference." She earns $1.50 a day. Men earn $2.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 7:32 pm

Earlier this summer in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, I heard a complaint from many professionals that they could no longer find cheap house cleaners and nannies.

The apparently endless supply of girls and young women from the countryside who would work for peanuts just for a chance to move to the capital was drying up. It turns out more and more of them are finding work on one of the city's many construction sites.

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All Tech Considered
4:21 am
Wed August 7, 2013

As Twitter Expands Reach, Abuse Policy Gets Added Scrutiny

This week, several women in the U.K. went public about explicit abuse they received on Twitter.
Alastair Grant AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 12:26 pm

A series of threats and abusive messages aimed at prominent women in the U.K. have placed Twitter in an awkward spot. As the company gears up to go public and expand its brand around the world, it is increasingly running into cultural and legal hurdles that challenge Twitter's free speech ethos.

Earlier this year, Caroline Criado-Perez led a successful campaign to keep non-royal British women on the country's currency. Then last week, because of that work, the 29-year-old activist and blogger became the target of an organized barrage of hateful messages on Twitter.

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A Blog Supreme
4:20 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Derrick Hodge: Finding Music In Unexpected Moments

Many musicians discover their love for music through church, but Derrick Hodge found church through music. His debut solo album, Live Today, comes out August 6.
Chris Baldwin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 12:45 pm

There are some weird sounds in jazz musician Derrick Hodge's song "Table Jawn." It was recorded at the breakfast table, during an argument Hodge was having with some bandmates.

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Sweetness And Light
1:12 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Dick Kazmaier, 'A Honey Of A Guy'

Dick Kazmaier of Princeton University poses with the Heisman Trophy at New York's Downtown Athletic Club before the official presentation in 1951. Kazmaier, the last Ivy Leaguer to win the Heisman Trophy, died on Thursday.
John Rooney AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 5:24 am

You may never have heard of Dick Kazmaier. After all, he played in the Ivy League, never went to the NFL and filled a position, tailback, in a formation, the single-wing, that has long since disappeared.

But as the years have passed, that is what makes Kazmaier so special: that he best represented another time, when there was more whimsy and capriciousness to college athletics.

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The Two-Way
12:55 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Obama To Leno: 'There Is No Spying On Americans'

President Obama jokes with Jay Leno during a commercial break at the taping of his appearance on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno on Tuesday in Los Angeles.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 11:01 am

President Obama defended the U.S. government's surveillance programs, telling NBC's Jay Leno on Tuesday that: "There is no spying on Americans."

"We don't have a domestic spying program," Obama said on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. "What we do have is some mechanisms that can track a phone number or an email address that is connected to a terrorist attack. ... That information is useful."

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Kitchen Window
12:13 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Cobbled Together: American Fruit Desserts

Emily Hilliard for NPR

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 12:56 am

Cobbler. I didn't understand the dessert until I understood the word.

A professional "cobbler" is often thought of as a shoemaker and repairman, but a true cobbler is only a mender of shoes. A cordwainer is the more masterful footwear maker.

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Shots - Health News
6:33 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Genetic Code Shows Bird Flu In China Spread Between People

A man who just recovered from the H7N9 bird flu leaves a hospital in Bozhou, China, in April. Since early May, the number of new H7N9 cases has dramatically declined.
AFP Getty Images

When a new strain of bird flu cropped up in China last winter, the billion-dollar question was whether the deadly virus could transmit between people.

Now, Chinese scientists offer the first clear evidence that the bird flu is indeed contagious, although only slightly.

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The Two-Way
6:32 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Judge Cuts Bradley Manning's Possible Sentence To 90 Years

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted from court on July 25, in Fort Meade, Md.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

The military judge presiding over the sentencing of Pfc. Bradley Manning today reduced the maximum possible sentence the former intelligence analyst could face.

Manning, 25, who was found guilty of espionage and theft in the largest leak of classified intelligence in U.S. history, could face up to 90 years in prison, a maximum sentence that is down from the original 136 years.

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Movie Reviews
6:26 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Poseidon's Little Squirt Is Back, And He's Still At Sea

Percy Jackson (Logan Lerman of Perks of Being a Wallflower) and his pal Annabeth (Alexandra Daddario) are two of the unusually talented teens resident at Camp Half-Blood, a summer retreat for — well, demigods, not to put too fine a point on it.
Fox

Returning from sleep-away camp, my teenage daughter, who'd hitherto declared reading a foreign pursuit, announced that she was now a "bookie." Ruthlessly suppressing my inner jig, I nodded casually and asked how this literary epiphany had come about. A cabin full of reader-girls, it seemed, had turned her on to Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson series. And so it came to pass that, over the next few weeks, my child holed up at the library and indulged a burgeoning obsession with Greek mythology.

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Pop Culture
5:58 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Fear Of Clowns: Yes, It's Real

Tim Curry as Pennywise in a 1990 TV adaptation of Stephen King's It. Come on, tell us you aren't just a little creeped out.
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:53 am

Warning: The following story may be upsetting to some people.

That's because it's about clowns.

Yes, clowns. Painted white faces, red lips, receding hairlines with tufts of wild hair, and — of course — the red foam nose. Fun for all ages, yet plenty of people are downright scared of them. There's even a word for it: coulrophobia, though that's not an official diagnosis.

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This Is NPR
5:51 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Preparing For The Worst: Training Journalists For Reporting In War Zones

Richard Knox, Peter Breslow, Deb Amos and Didi Schanche (l-r) pose with CPR dummies.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:14 am

Two passenger vans full of NPR staffers headed up a mountain in May, trying to get to a press conference behind rebel lines. It wasn't going to be easy.

"I was sitting in the passenger seat. We got to the first checkpoint, and we could see that they were drunk and very hostile," correspondent Carrie Kahn said. "I was trying not to make eye contact, but was immediately pulled out of the car." The people at the checkpoint had weapons and things escalated. Then producer Tom Bullock stepped in and diffused the situation, at least for the time being.

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The Two-Way
5:17 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Reports: U.S. Files First Criminal Charges In Benghazi Attacks

Sept. 11: The U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was aflame after coming under attack.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 6:10 pm

CNN, The Wall Street Journal and NBC News are reporting that the United States has filed charges against a number of people suspected of orchestrating the attacks against the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

California Takes Drivers' Orders For 'Vintage' Car Plates

The real deal: California's new vintage car tag program would let drivers emulate icons of cool such as actor Steve McQueen, seen here in his Ford-Cobra roadster in 1963.
Dick Stroebel AP

Thousands of California drivers are ordering specialty vintage license tags for their cars, in a program that lets people choose new tags based on designs from the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. The throw-back plates will let drivers put iconic blue, black, or yellow plates on their vehicles.

And in a nod to way things used to be, the tags' letters and numbers will be stamped, not screen-printed, as John Rabe reports for Southern California Public Radio.

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Environment
5:05 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Earth Scientists Pin Climate Change Squarely On 'Humanity'

Pedersen Glacier, 1917
Louis H. Pedersen climate.gov/National Snow and Ice Data Center

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 8:12 pm

The weather is one of those topics that is fairly easy for people to agree on. Climate, however, is something else.

Most of the scientists who study the Earth say our climate is changing and humans are part of what's making that happen. But to a lot of nonscientists it's still murky. This week, two of the nation's most venerable scientific institutions tried to explain it better.

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The Salt
4:54 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Heck No Or Let's Go? Your Thoughts On Lab-Grown Meat

The scientists who developed the in vitro beef say it could help solve the coming food crisis and combat climate change.
David Parry / PA Wire

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 5:52 pm

Would you taste or buy a lab-grown hamburger if you could? That's the question we posed Monday at the end of our report on the world's first in vitro burger, launched this week at a tasting event in London that was streamed via the Internet.

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