World

The Two-Way
1:59 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Mandela Has Made 'Remarkable Progress,' Daughter Says

On the eve of Nelson Mandela's 95th birthday, street vendors in Pretoria, South Africa, were selling T-shirts to mark the occasion. Madiba is Mandela's tribal name.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 2:42 pm

Nelson Mandela is making "remarkable progress" and could be released from a Pretoria hospital soon, his daughter tells Sky News on the eve of the anti-apartheid icon's 95th birthday.

Zindzi Mandela, 52, also says her father is communicating with his eyes and hands, watching television and that "you can see he is there in his eyes; the same energy and strength."

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The Salt
1:48 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Your Love Of Quinoa Is Good News For Andean Farmers

Farmer Geronimo Blanco shows his quinoa plants in Patamanta, Bolivia, in February. A burgeoning global demand for quinoa has led to a threefold price increase since 2006.
Juan Karita AP

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 6:15 pm

Quinoa lovers have been put on a bit of a guilt trip with stories suggesting that the increased demand in the U.S. has put the superfood out of reach for those living closest to where it's grown.

How can poor Bolivians in La Paz afford to pay three times more for quinoa than they would pay for rice, critics have asked?

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Shots - Health News
1:22 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Weight Loss Is Worth Gold In Dubai

Lose pounds and gain grams of gold in Dubai.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 10:43 am

If you want people to slim down, why not reward them with gold? That's the tack being taken in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Alarmed at ballooning waistlines in a region where fast food is common and comfortable outdoor exercise is not, the local government is offering to give citizens a gram of gold for each kilogram lost by Aug. 16, according to news reports.

That's about $41 for a little over two pounds of pudge, based on today's market rate.

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Ask Me Another
1:14 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Our Magnum Opus

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 9:55 am

In this Ask Me Another final round, puzzle guru Art Chung quizzes the remaining contestants on phrases and proper nouns that contain the name of a musical instrument. For example, a narrow type of stemware that you might drink your Dom Perignon out of is a "champagne flute."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

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Ask Me Another
1:14 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

The Freaks Shall Inherit The Earth

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 2:16 pm

For those who came of age in the 90s, or went to high school in the 80s, Freaks and Geeks is a cultural touchstone. Not only because it so perfectly captured the pains and joys of adolescence, but also because its young cast would go on to do amazing things. We quiz the show's creator, Paul Feig, about what everyone in the cast has been up to since their roles in Freaks and Geeks.

Plus, house musician Jonathan Coulton gives Joan Jett's "Bad Reputation" (also the Freaks and Geeks theme song) his own nerd-rock treatment.

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NPR Story
12:55 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

What Are People Drinking Instead Of Coke?

A restored Coca-Cola mural in Georgia. (Brent Moore/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 5:05 pm

Coca-Cola reported disappointing second-quarter results, citing bad weather and weak global growth.

But the company has steadily lost consumers in the United States, as people become more wary of consuming sugary drinks.

So what are Americans drinking instead?

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Asiana Decides Not To Sue San Francisco TV Station

Passengers move away from the wreckage of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 after the plane's July 6 crash-landing in San Francisco. This photo was taken by a passenger.
Eugene Anthony Rah Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 12:34 pm

Asiana Airlines has decided not sue the Oakland television station that aired the bogus names of the flight crew piloting Flight 214, a Boeing 777 that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport earlier this month.

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NPR Story
12:40 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Rep. John Lewis Pushes For Updated Voting Rights Act

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court's decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 5:05 pm

The Senate Judiciary Committee will hear testimony on Wednesday on the future of the Voting Rights Act. In June, the Supreme Court nullified a key provision of the act, ruling the law was outdated.

The decision ended the requirement for more than a dozen states to clear new election laws with the Department of Justice.

Now it’s up to Congress to update the formula used to determine which states need extra oversight, based on their history of past voting rights abuses.

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NPR Story
12:35 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

In China, Another Food Scandal Makes Headlines

BBC correspondent Celia Hatton holds up the results of a home food test, indicating that the milk is contaminated. (BBC video screenshot)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 5:05 pm

In China, it seems to be “another week, another food scandal.” Chinese citizens are worn down with news of contaminated food — including toxic milk powder, poisonous rice and fake food.

Unscrupulous restaurants and food stalls have been caught selling everything from fake eggs made of gelatine, to the latest scandal — duck meat passed off as lamb.

So how are the citizens reacting? They’re coming up with their own solutions to deal with the crisis, as the BBC’s Celia Hatton reports from Beijing.

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NPR Story
12:15 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Khaled Hosseini's Latest Bestseller Spans Generations

Khaled Hosseini is author of "And The Mountains Echoed." (Elena Seibert)

Author Khaled Hosseini found international fame with his debut novel, “The Kite Runner.”

Now he’s out with his third book, “And the Mountains Echoed,” which tells a story spanning decades and stretching from a village in Afghanistan to Paris and California (excerpt below).

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NPR Story
12:06 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Heat Wave Bears Down On U.S.

Kids cool off in the spray of an open hydrant on a hot evening in Lawrence, Mass. Tuesday, July 16, 2013. (Elise Amendola/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 5:05 pm

The first big heat wave of the summer is here, bearing down on all parts of the U.S., following temperatures that blistered the West Coast in June.

Typically heat waves occur twice every summer. Meteorology director Jeff Masters of Weather Underground says expect the current bout of oppressive heat to last a bit longer than the usual three days. Look for relief by Saturday.

Heat wave highlights

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The Record
12:03 pm
Wed July 17, 2013

Pusha T's New York Doubleheader

Pusha T performs during the 2013 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival in Indio, California.
Karl Walter Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 11:55 am

There were two very different hip-hop shows in New York on Saturday: the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival and New Era's #WearYourAllegiance show.

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NPR Story
11:48 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Howard Students Go From 'The Sing-Off' To Success

The a cappella group Traces of Blue joins host Michel Martin for an in-studio performance.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:33 pm

Traces of Blue isn't quite a household name just yet, but if you're familiar with NBC's The Sing-Off, you might remember them by their old name, Afro-Blue, the a cappella jazz group hailing from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

They recently took a break from working on their debut EP to stop by NPR's D.C. studios for a special performance.

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Parallels
11:42 am
Wed July 17, 2013

School Tragedy Puts Focus On Poor Health Of India's Children

This man's daughter, who ate tainted food at a school on Tuesday, died in the eastern Indian city of Patna on Wednesday.
AP

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:42 pm

We're following the tragedy in India where more than 20 children died after eating tainted food Tuesday at their school as part of their midday meal program.

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Mountain Stage
11:20 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Ari Hest On Mountain Stage

Ari Hest performs on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:25 pm

Ari Hest makes his third appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Clay Center for the Arts and Sciences in Charleston, W.Va. Originally from the Bronx, Hest began booking and promoting his own shows while attending New York University, releasing three albums on his own label. This eventually led to a 2003 record deal and his major-label debut, Someone to Tell.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Wed July 17, 2013

The Randomness Of Lightning Fatalities: A Map Story

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 11:50 am

Lightning strikes somewhere on Earth about 100 times per second, equaling 8.6 million times per day and more than 3 billion times a year. The odds of being struck by lightning, however, are extremely slim, and smaller still are the odds of that strike being fatal; only 1 in 10 strikes results in death.

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Shots - Health News
11:07 am
Wed July 17, 2013

A Warm Winter Helped Fuel West Nile Outbreak In Dallas

A sprayer truck blankets a neighborhood in North Dallas with insecticide to curb mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus in July 2012.
Tom Fox/Dallas Morning News Corbis

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 10:43 am

West Nile virus looked like it was waning as a health threat, with the number of cases dropping each year. Then last summer, it roared back.

The number of people infected with the mosquito-borne illness suddenly spiked in 2012. And Dallas was hit hardest of all.

People showed up in emergency rooms with encephalitis and paralysis, unable to breathe on their own.

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World Cafe's Sense Of Place: Rio
11:02 am
Wed July 17, 2013

World Cafe's Map Of Rio

map

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 3:49 pm

The World Cafe crew recently traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the seventh destination in our Sense of Place series. From samba venues to popular bars, get a behind-the-scenes look at our trip through the city. We even venture further down along the coast to explore outside Rio de Janeiro, including Copacabana Beach and Sugarloaf Mountain.

All Songs Considered
11:01 am
Wed July 17, 2013

First Watch: Kingsley Flood, 'Sigh A While'

Courtesy Of The Artist

It's one thing for an artist to talk about his failures — that's easy fodder for a good song — but art at its best incites positive change. "Sigh A While," this song from Boston's Kingsley Flood, is written to inspire. Kingsley Flood's Naseem Khuri says this tune is about the failures in all of us, and in particular about the patterns we can fall into. "I wrote the song about a friend who for years assured me he'd quit his job and change the world with his art," Khuri writes in an email. "We were driving around in his beat-up car one day and he was making the same promises.

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Monkey See
10:56 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Morning Shots: Not One But Two Bits Of Shark News

iStockphoto.com

It is with some joy, and also a little trepidation, that the entire Monkey See family welcomes the news that Sharknado 2 is a thing that will happen. Because really, is that singular Sharknado lightning terribly likely to strike twice?

On the other hand: The sequel will be set in New York City, so consider the quantity of hipsters who'll face flying piscine peril. [The Wrap]

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