World

Deceptive Cadence
2:43 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Marches Madness: High-Stepping To Scott Joplin

Mezzo-soprano Grace Bumbry (center) in a 2010 production of Scott Joplin's Treemonisha at the Châtelet Theater in Paris.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:16 pm

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SXSW: Live From Austin
2:11 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Molotov, Live In Concert: SXSW 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 10:02 am

  • Molotov, Recorded Live At Auditorium Shores

Politics and rock en Español go hand in hand, and Mexico City's Molotov is a flag-waver for that combination. The band formed in 1995 during an era in which seismic political changes transformed Mexican society; from the start, Molotov's music pointed fingers at economic and political institutions — and even aging rock stars.

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Europe
2:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

The Ripple Effects Of Cyprus' Financial Crisis

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:42 pm

Cyprus lawmakers rejected a $13 billion bailout package that included controversial taxes on bank deposits. The proposed tax would have helped to pay for the bailout of crumbling banks. NPR's Marilyn Geewax explains how the events in Cyprus could affect the global economy and what may happen next.

Remembrances
2:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

A Ballet Memorial To A Son Killed At War

Dancer Josh Burnham plays the role of Colin Wolfe in the Manassas Ballet Theatre production Colin.
Melanie Beus Photography

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:32 pm

Colin Wolfe was killed in Iraq in August 2006. A roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle in Anbar province just a few weeks after he arrived. He was one of almost 4,500 U.S. service members killed in Iraq between 2003 and 2012. Nearly seven years later, on the heels of the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, his mother paid tribute to her son with a ballet.

"You're taking something which is horrible ... and turning it into something which is beautiful and life-affirming," Amy Wolfe tells NPR's Lynn Neary. "That's the way art is."

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Malala, Pakistani Teen Shot For Demanding An Education, Heads To School In U.K.

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, attends her first day of school on Tuesday just weeks after being released from the hospital.
Malala Press Office AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:53 pm

Some terrific news today: Malala Yousafzai's story has come full circle. If you remember, the Pakistani teenager was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman because she was in favor of girls receiving an education.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Hey Punxsutawney Phil, What Happened To That Early Spring?

The sign says one thing. The snow pile says another. In Boston on Tuesday, a woman walked between a store sign heralding the start of spring and a snow pile still lingering from this winter's storms.
Brian Snyder Reuters /Landov

"An early spring for you and me."

So said Punxsutawney Phil back on Groundhog Day (Feb. 2.) — which, if our math is right was, 6+ weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Flush With Oil, Abu Dhabi Opens World's Largest Solar Plant

Rows of parabolic mirrors at the Shams 1 plant in Abu Dhabi.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:34 pm

Abu Dhabi, the most oil-rich of the United Arab Emirates, is now home to the world's single-largest concentrated solar power plant.

The 100-megawatt Shams 1 plant cost an estimated $750 million and is expected to provide electricity to 20,000 homes, according to the BBC.

Why, you might ask?

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World Cafe
1:20 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Billy Bragg On World Cafe

Billy Bragg.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 8:14 pm

With a career spanning more than 30 years, English musician Billy Bragg blends folk, rock and punk with messages about politics and love. His new album Tooth & Nail is his first release in five years.

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The Salt
1:20 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

How Master Chefs Keep France's Brightest Culinary Flames Alive

Serge Devesa, executive chef at New York's InterContinental Barclay Hotel, prepares bouillabaisse, a specialty from his hometown of Marseille, France. Devesa was just named a master chef by the Maître Cuisiniers de France.
Courtesy of InterContinental Barclay

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 3:08 pm

On the television show MasterChef, amateur chefs compete for a title and go on to open their own restaurants, or ink TV deals. That's the Hollywood version of the master chef, anyway.

But to earn the title in France, chefs must be inducted into the prestigious — and very exclusive — society called Maître Cuisiniers de France. It's more than 60-years-old, and it's one of the highest honors in the country.

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The Two-Way
12:50 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

House Across From Westboro Baptist Is Painted With Gay Pride Rainbow Colors

Planting Peace is painting the house across from the Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka with the colors of the gay pride rainbow.
Courtesy of Carol Hartsell Huffington Post

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 3:41 pm

Aaron Jackson took inspiration from a 9-year-old kid who stood up to Westboro Baptist Church protesters.

As Mark wrote last year, Josef Miles stood in front of protesters carrying signs that read "God Hates [Gays]" with his own sign that read "God Hates No One."

Today, Jackson is following through on a project that started about six months ago when he decided to buy a house across the street from the infamous church in Topeka, Kan.

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It's All Politics
12:41 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Rand Paul Reaffirms Support For Path To Citizenship

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks Tuesday to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:02 pm

Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky doubled down Tuesday on a previous call for a path to citizenship, telling a major Hispanic business group that his message to the nation's illegal immigrants is: "If you wish to live and work in America, then we will find a place for you."

Conservatives, he told the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, must "become part of the solution" to immigration, including dealing with the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants now living in the U.S. In his Washington speech, Paul said:

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Shots - Health News
12:39 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Sorting Out The Mammogram Debate: Who Should Get Screened When?

A woman gets a mammogram in Putanges, France.
Mychele Daniau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 4:21 pm

Mammography outcomes from nearly a million U.S. women suggest which ones under 50 would stand the greatest chance of benefiting from regular screening: those with very dense breasts.

That's been a bone of contention ever since a federal task force declared nearly four years ago that women younger than 50 shouldn't routinely get the test.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Has The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Been Downgraded?

With President Clinton presiding, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left) and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed an interim peace accord at the White House in 1993. Twenty years later, President Obama is heading to the region with peace efforts in the deep freeze.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:18 am

Every American president since Harry Truman has wrestled with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, to no avail. Yet they keep trying based on the notion that the Middle East will never be calm until there's peace between these protagonists.

But as President Obama heads to Israel and the West Bank, expectations could hardly be lower. What's more, this long-standing feud, often seen as the holy grail of American diplomacy, no longer seems to hold the same urgency, according to many analysts.

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Television
11:27 am
Tue March 19, 2013

A Measured Look At Roth As The Writer Turns 80

A new documentary about Philip Roth premieres on PBS next week as part of a slew of celebrations in honor of the novelist's 80th birthday.
PBS

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:11 pm

In Chinua Achebe's novel The Anthills of the Savannah, one of the characters says, "Poets don't give prescriptions. They give headaches."

The same is true of novelists, and none more so than Philip Roth. If any writer has ever enjoyed rattling people's skulls, it's this son of Newark, N.J., who's currently enjoying something of a victory lap in the media on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The celebration reaches its peak with a new documentary — Philip Roth Unmasked — that will screen on PBS next week as part of the American Masters series.

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Favorite Sessions
11:23 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Anais Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer: Tackling 'Tam Lin'

Anais Mitchell & Jefferson Hamer perform the ancient ballad "Tam Lin" at the 2013 Folk Alliance International Conference in February.
Folk Alley

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:16 pm

Anaïs Mitchell has a knack for mythology that flies over the heads of most modern songwriters. From her adaptation of the Orpheus myth on Hadestown — an arresting "folk opera" wherein Orpheus and Eurydice struggle through a post-apocalyptic economic depression — to the nuanced interweaving of Biblical and Greek mythology in last year's Young Man in America, she's proven adept at mingling the ancient and the contemporary.

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Shots - Health News
10:33 am
Tue March 19, 2013

The Doctor Will See You And A Dozen Strangers Now

Group therapy is popular in mental health circles. Are group appointments for medical conditions worth a try?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:59 pm

If the idea of sharing your personal medical troubles with your doctor and a bunch of total strangers gives you sweaty palms, you're not alone.

Yet, a growing number of people are swallowing hard and doing it. Along the way, they're discovering that they can get more time with the doctor and learn a few things from their fellow patients by forgoing a one-on-one appointment for a group medical visit.

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It's All Politics
10:31 am
Tue March 19, 2013

RNC Chair's 'Postmortem' Report A Line In The Sand For Divided GOP

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 3:24 pm

The release of a "postmortem" report on the 2012 national election by the Republican National Committee is either the first step toward the GOP's recovery or the latest sign that the party is headed for a breakup.

Or, it could be both.

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The Two-Way
10:25 am
Tue March 19, 2013

India's Coalition Totters As Party Withdraws Support

Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh in New Delhi on Tuesday. His coalition government is looking weaker.
Prakash Singh AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 11:23 am

A key ally in India's coalition government has withdrawn its support, jeopardizing an economic overhaul of the country's finances aimed at staving off a credit downgrade.

The Congress party-led government is likely to survive, even without the backing of 18 members of Parliament belonging to the rogue Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (DMK) party, which is composed of mainly ethnic Tamils from the country's southern state of Tamil Nadu.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Australia's Heron Island: A Canary In The Coal Mine For Coral Reefs?

Heron Island is located on the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, about 25 miles off the northeast coast of Australia.
Ted Mead Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 11:02 am

NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris traveled to Australia's Great Barrier Reef to find out how the coral reefs are coping with increased water temperature and increasing ocean acidity, brought about by our burning of fossil fuels. Day 1: Richard gets a hefty dose of bad news.

I've seen the future, and it isn't pretty.

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Europe
9:38 am
Tue March 19, 2013

Cyprus Proposes Exempting Smaller Deposits From Tax

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Lawmakers in Cyprus are trying to ease rage over a proposed tax on all bank deposits by exempting people who have relatively small accounts. It's part of a bailout plan for that Mediterranean country negotiated with the E.U. and IMF over the weekend, but the compromise on taxes may not be enough for Cyprus' parliament to pass the plan.

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