World

SXSW: Live From Austin
2:43 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Live In Concert: SXSW 2013

The New York trio performed their new single "Sacrilege" for the first time in front of an audience.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 4:59 pm

Yeah Yeah Yeahs' Karen O pulls off one of the trickiest maneuvers in rock 'n' roll: the ability to appear utterly bonkers on stage while remaining in control of every chaotic outburst. The woman knows how to make an entrance, too: She emerged on stage at Stubb's in Austin — for the band's sole appearance at SXSW 2013 — clad in canary yellow, sporting a sparkly fez, giant eyeglasses, and a glittering scarf.

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SXSW: Live From Austin
2:42 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds, Live In Concert: SXSW 2013

Nick Cave performs at Stubb's Bar-B-Q as part of NPR Music's 2013 SXSW Showcase.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 3:44 pm

It began, appropriately enough, with a plea for darkness. Nick Cave may have opened his SXSW set in the twilight hours, but if anyone could will the night into being, it's the black-clad Australian star.

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The Two-Way
2:34 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

In Response To North Korea And Iran, U.S. Will Beef Up Missile Defenses

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 5:19 pm

Update at 3:09 p.m. ET. 14 Additional Interceptors:

The United States will deploy 14 additional ground-based missile interceptors (GBIs) to combat the nuclear attack threats from North Korea and Iran, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said today during a press briefing.

"The United States stands firm against aggression," Hagel said.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

VIDEO: See Comet Pan-STARRS Dragging Its Tail Through Space

Comet PanSTARRS, as viewed by NASA's orbiting STEREO (Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory).
NASA

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:03 pm

Comet Pan-STARRS is putting on a bit of a show for those in the Northern Hemisphere through the end of this month. We're seeing some beautiful photos, such as those taken this week by AFP/Getty's Stan Honda. He pointed his camera skyward near Magdalena, N.M.

The best viewing came earlier this week, but Forbes writes that if you're in the Northern Hemisphere you're not too late to see Pan-STARRS. It offers some tips:

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All Songs Considered
2:11 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

SXSW 2013: Day Three In Photos

Ecstatic Cafe Tacvba fans at Alt.Latino's SXSW showcase at Auditorium Shores.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:02 pm

¡Viva! Alt.Latino presented a killer showcase from Auditorium Shores with Cafe Tacvba and Bajofondo on Thursday.

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World Cafe
2:03 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Local Natives On World Cafe

Local Natives.
Bryan Sheffield Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 5:31 pm

Local Natives, a Los Angeles-based indie-rock outfit, made a splash in 2009 with its self-funded debut album Gorilla Manor. The band went on tour with Arcade Fire and The National in support of the record, which hit No. 3 on the Billboard 200 New Artist Chart.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:01 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Marches Madness: Beware Friday The 15th!

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:02 pm

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The Two-Way
1:31 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

To Mark 10th Anniversary Of Iraq Invasion, Researchers Assess The Cost

Members of the US Army's Old Guard carry team lift the remains of U.S. Army Specialist Israel Candelaria Mejias from San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico, as his body is returned on a C-17 to the U.S. from Iraq on April 7, 2009.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Nearly ten years since the United States invaded Iraq, researchers at Brown University are assessing the cost of the war.

The report, from Brown's Watson Institute for International Studies, is comprehensive, taking a look at the direct and indirect costs of war, but from the university's press release, here is bottom line:

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

A Peek Into Exoplanet's Atmosphere Offers Clues To How It Was Formed

The 10-meter Keck II (right), a twin of the world's largest optical telescope, was used to study the atmosphere of HR 8799c.
Richard Wainscoat AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 3:06 pm

Scientists peering into the atmosphere of a giant planet 130 light years away believe their findings bolster one theory of how solar systems form.

The planet, orbiting the star HR 8799, is part of a solar system containing at least three other "super-Jupiters" weighing in at between five and 10 times the mass of our own Jupiter. The nearby system features a brash, young 30-million-year-old star (by contrast, our Sun is in midlife at about 4.5 billion years old).

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Shots - Health News
12:57 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

More Patients Keep HIV At Bay Without Antiviral Drugs

An electron micrograph of HIV particles infecting a human T cell. French researchers say they've found 14 patients with so little HIV virus in their blood that the patients have gone into "long-term remission."
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:00 am

Just last week AIDS researchers were excited about a Mississippi toddler whose blood has remained free of HIV many months after she stopped getting antiviral drugs – what doctors call a "functional cure."

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Mountain Stage
12:32 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Charlie Mars On Mountain Stage

Charlie Mars.
Brian Blauser Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:52 am

Charlie Mars makes his first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia University in Morgantown, W.Va.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Court Says CIA Can't Have It Both Ways On Drones

Don't deny you have documents about drones, court tells the CIA.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 2:56 pm

A federal appeals court has rejected an effort by the CIA to deny it has any documents about a U.S. drone program that has killed terrorists overseas, ruling that the agency is stretching the law too far and asking judges "to give their imprimatur to a fiction of deniability that no reasonable person would regard as plausible."

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The Two-Way
12:11 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Man Who Set Fire To Navy Submarine Sentenced To 17 Years

The Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) enters a dry dock to begin an engineered overhaul at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.
Jim Cleveland U.S. Navy

Casey Fury, the civilian employee who set fire to the USS Miami nuclear-powered attack submarine in Maine was sentenced to 17 years in prison, today.

Fury pleaded guilty to two counts of arson, one for the Miami fire, the other for a fire he set weeks later.

Sea Coast Online reports:

"'From the bottom of my heart, I'm truly sorry,' Fury said during his sentencing hearing. 'I can't put into words the remorse I feel. I had no intention of hurting anyone.'"

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Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of March 14, 2013

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 10:03 am

Joyce Carol Oates' The Accursed, a genre-bending, supernatural, historical novel, debuts at No. 10.

NPR Bestseller List
12:03 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of March 14, 2013

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

The Two-Way
11:33 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Construction Crews May Have Found 'Black Plague' Victims In Britain

Archaeologists examine skeletons thought to be from the 14th century that were discovered in an excavation belonging to British rail company, Crossrail.
Crossrail

What can you find underneath a British railroad or parking lot? These days it could be skeletons, and probably a lot of them. Last month, researchers announced the bones of a man discovered underneath a British parking lot were actually King Richard III. Today, a British rail project says some of its staff stumbled upon skeletons of people who may have died of the Black Death nearly 700 years ago, during an outbreak of bubonic plague.

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NPR Story
11:16 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Will Pope Francis Answer Muslims' Prayers, Too?

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 4:15 pm

Host Michel Martin checks in with the Barbershop guys for a fresh cut on the week's news, including the new pope and college basketball's March Madness. Martin is joined by culture critic Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, sports writer Pablo Torre and Reverend Leo Patalinghug.

The Two-Way
10:17 am
Fri March 15, 2013

New Pope Praises Benedict, Asks Cardinals To Evangelize

Pope Francis as he visits the papal residence at the Vatican on Thursday.
Vatican AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:43 pm

Pope Francis, in his first audience with the cardinals since becoming head of the world's 1.2 billion Roman Catholics, praised his predecessor, Benedict XVI, and urged the evangelization of the church's message.

Francis said of Benedict, who served as pontiff for eight years before his historic resignation last month, that he "lit a flame in the depths of our hearts that will continue to burn because it is fueled by his prayers."

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Shots - Health News
10:14 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Power Shift Under Way As Middle Class Expands In Developing World

Brookings Institution

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 9:00 am

"The meek shall inherit the earth" — that seems to be the latest message from the United Nations Development Program.

Their 2013 Human Development Report chronicles the recent, rapid expansion of the middle class in the developing world. It also predicts that over the next two decades growth in the so-called "Global South" will dramatically shift economic and political power away from Europe and North America.

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TED Radio Hour
10:11 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Is The Human Hand Our Best Technology?

"Only the hand can tell where it's tender, where the patient winces." — Abraham Verghese
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 11:58 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Do We Need Humans?

About Abraham Verghese's TEDTalk

Modern medicine is in danger of losing a powerful, old-fashioned tool: human touch. Physician and writer Abraham Verghese describes our strange new world where patients are data points, and calls for a return to the traditional physical exam.

About Abraham Verghese

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