World

NPR Story
10:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Not-So-Sweet Side Effects of Artificial Sweeteners

People are turning to artificial sweeteners as a lower-calorie alternative to sugar. Writing in Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, researcher Susan Swithers argues that artificial sweeteners may negatively affect our metabolism and brain — and even lead to weight gain.

NPR Story
10:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Trying to Energize the Push for a Smart Grid

For years, electrical experts have been calling for a "smart grid" that could better sense and adapt to changing conditions, from electrical outages to shifts in power consumption. Massoud Amin, referred to by some as the "father of the smart grid," talks about how and why the country should improve its aging electrical infrastructure.

NPR Story
10:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Mysterious Radio Bursts, Sent From Deep Space

Reporting in Science, researchers write of discovering four radio bursts from outer space. Physicist Duncan Lorimer, who detected the first such explosion in 2007, discusses what could be causing these radio signals, such as evaporating black holes, an idea proposed by Stephen Hawking in the 1970s.

NPR Story
10:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Surf's Up for Pathogenic Viruses and Bacteria, Too

A day at the shore can leave beachgoers with more than a sunburn — a gulp of seawater can expose swimmers to disease-causing microbes like norovirus, salmonella, and adenovirus. Marine scientist Rachel Noble and environmental medicine researcher Samuel Dorevitch discuss the risk, and what's being done to limit swimmers' exposure.

TED Radio Hour
9:51 am
Fri July 12, 2013

What Motivates Us To Collaborate?

Clay Shirky speaking at TED.
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:02 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Collaborate.

About Clay Shirky's TEDTalk

Social media guru Clay Shirky looks at "cognitive surplus" — the shared, online work we do with our spare brain cycles. While we're busy contributing to the web in our small ways, we're building a better, more cooperative world.

About Clay Shirky

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
9:47 am
Fri July 12, 2013

John Bunch On Piano Jazz

Pianist John Bunch was born in Tipton, Ind., a small farming community north of Indianapolis. As a boy, he studied piano, and at 14, he was already playing with bands in central Indiana. During WWII, he served on a B17 Flying Fortress that was shot down over Germany. Bunch and his crew were taken captive, and while in a prison camp, he learned to arrange for big bands.

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The Two-Way
8:57 am
Fri July 12, 2013

On The Economy: Inflation Accelerates; Fed Rumors Rise

A surge in prices at the pump fueled inflation in June.
Jonathan Fickies Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:55 pm

The morning's major economic news:

-- Inflation. Wholesale prices rose 0.8 percent in June from May, fueled by a 2.9 percent surge in the price of energy products, the Bureau of Labor Statistics says. As drivers can confirm, a 7.2 percent jump in the cost of gasoline was responsible for most of that boost.

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Monkey See
8:35 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Sharknado' Dares To Ask: Is It Going To Rain Giant Man-Eating Sharks?

Aubrey Peeples as Fin's daughter in Sharknado. Which really happened.
Syfy

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:27 am

If you have a Twitter account, there's an excellent chance you already know about Sharknado, SyFy's meteorological-marine horror movie that premiered last night. When I tell you that a lot of people were tweeting about Sharknado, I'm not lying.

Not to mention ... well, you know. Possibly NPR personalities.

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The Two-Way
7:39 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Book News: 'The Great Gypsy'? School Reading List Is Error-Riddled

A student of the Barack Obama elementary school in Hempstead, N.Y. walks past a board displaying student essays on the president during the official name changing ceremony in 2009.
Mary Altaffer AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Europe
7:00 am
Fri July 12, 2013

After WikiLeaks Drama, Kremlin Goes Old School

The Kremlin's security agency has bought $15,000 worth of electric typewriters. A source told a Russian newspaper that after WikiLeaks and the Edward Snowden scandal, the Kremlin decided to "expand the practice of creating paper documents."

The Two-Way
6:33 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Snowden Hopes For Temporary Asylum In Russia

Edward Snowden, center, at Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport on Friday. At left is WikiLeaks' Sarah Harrison. The woman at right is unidentified at this time.
Courtesy of Human Rights Watch

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:02 pm

(We most recently added information to the top of this post at 11:15 a.m. ET. Click here for more updates. )

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Environment
5:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Environmentalists Warn Olympic Games Will Harm Sochi

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:19 am

Russia is preparing for the 2014 Winter Games — turning a sleepy valley in the Northern Caucasus Mountains into an Olympic village, with brand-new facilities for every Alpine sport. Officials say it will be a world-class destination for winter-sports enthusiasts long after the Games are over. Environmentalists say it's an ecological disaster in the making.

Business
5:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Despite Europe's Financial Crisis, Latvia To Adopt Euro

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:32 am

The words eurozone and crisis have been firmly linked together for the past half decade. Many eurozone economies have collapsed to Depression-era levels. And yet this week, the Baltic nation of Latvia, chose to join the euro. To understand that move, David Greene talks to Pauls Raudseps, economics editor of the Latvian weekly news magazine IR.

Europe
5:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Britons Wait For News On Royal Baby

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:04 am

The imminent arrival of the future heir to the British throne is spawning gambling, baby products and guessing over names. There's been no official announcement about when the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's baby is due. It's believed to be Saturday, and the kingdom is prepared.

Movie Reviews
5:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Pacific Rim' Is Filled To The Brim With Special Effects

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Another movie opening is "Pacific Rim." Critic Kenneth Turan says it has plenty of explosions and special effects, but he says there's actually more to it than most of the other blockbusters this summer.

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Parallels
3:19 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Israel's Internal Battle Over Ultra-Orthodox Soldiers

Soldiers close the gate to the tiny West Bank outpost, right next door to a Jewish settlement, where the HaHod platoon of the ultra-Orthodox Netzah Yahuda battalion is stationed.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 8:14 am

Moshe Haim always wanted to be a soldier. The 20-year-old is now a sergeant, more than halfway through three years of service in the Israeli military.

But when he goes home on leave, he doesn't talk about his military experiences to any of his eight siblings, especially his brothers.

"I know that for my parents and my brothers, the first, best choice is to be in the yeshiva and study there," he says at a small West Bank outpost where he's stationed. "It wasn't good for me, but my brothers are still pure."

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Middle East
3:17 am
Fri July 12, 2013

In Southern Syria, Rebels Say U.S. Support Is Critical

Free Syrian Army fighters after a battle against government troops in Zaizoon, near Dera'a, on Feb. 16.
Shaam News Network Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:38 pm

The battle for the city of Dera'a in southern Syria has become a test of an American pledge to give military support to rebels fighting Syrian President Bashar Assad. After a string of defeats, the rebels have scored rare victories around Dera'a.

But in interviews,rebel commanders passing through neighboring Jordan say those gains could be lost without a dependable arms pipeline and promised U.S. support.

Yasser Aboud, a thin, intense former colonel in the Syrian army, commands the joint operations center for southern Syria.

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Shots - Health News
3:16 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Messy Rollout Of Health Law Echoes Medicare Drug Expansion

Back in 2006, President Bush and Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt talked with reporters during a trip to Florida, where Bush spoke to volunteers helping seniors sign up for the Medicare prescription drug benefit.
Mike Stocker AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:13 am

It hasn't been a good week for the Affordable Care Act. After announcements by the administration of several delays of key portions of the law, Republicans returned to Capitol Hill and began piling on.

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Environment
2:46 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Sweeping Parts Of Southern Seas Could Become A Nature Preserve

The "Giant Tabular Iceberg" floats in Antarctica's Ross Sea in December 2011. Under a proposed new international agreement, large sections of the oceans around Antarctica would become protected as a marine preserve.
Camille Seaman Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:37 pm

The area of ocean set aside as a nature preserve could double or triple in the coming days, depending on the outcome of a meeting in Germany. Representatives from 24 countries and the European Union are considering setting aside large portions of ocean around Antarctica as a protected area. And the deal may hinge on preserving some fishing rights.

There are two proposals on the table: One would set aside huge parts of the Southern Ocean around East Antarctica; the other would focus on the Ross Sea, south of New Zealand.

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