World

Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jad Abumrad: Accidental Scientist

Jad Abumrad.
Marco Lau

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 11:01 am

  • Listen to Jad play "Accidental Science"
  • Listen To The Interview

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Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

For Your I's Only

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, it's what our contestants have been waiting for. Let's bring back our winners to play our Ask Me One More final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From Got Game, we have Max Bernstein. From Blinding Me With Science: Katie Hamill. From Submit It In Reduplicate: Matt Stefani. From Small Screen Adaptations: Brian Devinney. And from Long Before They Were Famous: Megan Schade.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Art Chung, what do you have in store for us?

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Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Small Screen Adaptations

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

TV shows are sometimes based on popular films, and while some are successful (Buffy The Vampire Slayer) others...not so much (Spaceballs: The Animated Series). Host Ophira Eisenberg has a few of her own ideas in this game, where players must "adapt" movie titles into shorter series versions by removing a letter to form a new, more succinct title.

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Ask Me Another
1:12 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Blinded Me With Science

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 10:42 am

Guest troubadours Paul & Storm have emerged from their lab to share their latest experiment. To pay tribute to Thomas Dolby's 1982 New Wave classic "She Blinded Me With Science," the duo has reworked the lyrics to describe different scientific principles and discoveries. So put on your safety goggles and play along!

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Shots - Health News
1:10 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Americans More Distracted Behind The Wheel Than Europeans

A woman uses a cellphone while driving in Los Angeles in 2011.
Damian Dovarganes AP

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:34 pm

U.S. drivers are much more likely than Europeans to drive while distracted, federal health officials report Thursday.

Nearly 69 percent of Americans who drive say that they talked on their cell phones while driving at least once in the previous month, according to a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's a lot higher than what was reported by Europeans in another survey. Only 21 percent of British drivers reported chatting on their cell phones while behind the wheel, for example. In Germany and France it was about 40 percent.

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It's All Politics
12:57 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jeb Bush Opts Out Of CPAC Straw Poll

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has asked that his name not be among a long list of potential 2016 Republican presidential candidates in this week's Conservative Political Action Conference straw poll.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:54 pm

Jeb Bush got headlines last week when he opened the door to a presidential run, after years of insisting he was not interested.

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The Two-Way
12:36 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Jesuits Have Played Central Role In History Of The Church

Jesuit Mission in Santa Catalina in Cordoba in Argentina.
Luis Davilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:09 pm

Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio's ascendency to Pope Francis has suddenly placed his Jesuit order in the spotlight.

Francis' papacy is the first for a member of the Society of Jesus, which was founded in 1540 by the Spaniard St. Ignatius of Loyola and has grown to become the single-largest Catholic order, playing a central and occasionally controversial role within the church.

Today, some 20,000 Jesuits, about three-quarters of them priests, work in more than 100 countries and are best known for the schools and institutions of higher learning they administer.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Monarch Butterfy Population Falls To Record Low, Mexican Scientists Say

Monarch butterflies in December 2008 at the Sierra del Chincua sanctuary in Angangueo, in the Mexican state of Michoacan.
Mario Vazquez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:47 pm

Monarch butterflies that once covered 50 square acres of forest during their summer layover in central Mexico now occupy fewer than 3 acres, according to the latest census.

The numbers of the orange-and-black butterflies have crashed in the two decades since scientists began making a rough count of them, according to Mexico's National Commission of Natural Protected Areas.

At a news conference Wednesday, the commission said the count was down 59 percent from December 2011 levels, when the insects filled 7.14 acres of fir trees in central Mexico.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Modern Parenthood: More Equal, More Stressed

Maybe in the 1940s, they just let them cry.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:50 pm

If you've ever had a spousal spat over who logs more time on housework, child care, or at the office, you might want to see how you stack up against other couples.

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The Picture Show
12:23 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Taking A Look At Laos

Kongthaly works at Thanaleng station, the first and only railway station in Laos. He received his training in Thailand, as the Laos station adopted their operating system from Thailand railway.
Ore Huiying

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 4:20 pm

A diminutive, landlocked, communist country, Laos has a deserved reputation for being a quiet country in a dynamic region. But the rapid modernization in Southeast Asia is beginning to touch Laos as well.

A Chinese-funded trans-Asian rail is set to run right through Laos, connecting China's southern Yunnan province to Bangkok, Thailand. But some analysts say this is more likely to serve the countries it is connecting — largely China — rather than Laos.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:16 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Marches Madness: Heralding The Pope

A marching band perfroms before the introduction of Pope Francis at St. Peter's Basilica on Wednesday in Vatican City.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:56 am

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From Scratch
12:08 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Robert Langer, Founder Of MIT's Langer Lab

Jessica Harris will speak with Dr. Robert Langer, founder of MIT's Langer Lab, one of the world's largest biomedical engineering labs. He pioneered the fields of tissue engineering and drug delivery, which has lead to the creation of more than 30 companies.

Later, Harris will also talk to Elizabeth Cutler and Julie Rice, co-founders of SoulCycle.

Shots - Health News
12:04 pm
Thu March 14, 2013

Cardiac Arrest Survivors Have Better Outlook Than Doctors Think

Students at the College of Central Florida in Ocala, Fla., perform CPR on a mock patient.
Bruce Ackerman Ocala Star-Banner /Landov

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 9:48 am

Every day something like 550 hospitalized Americans suffer cardiac arrest. That's bad news. Only about one in five will live to leave the hospital.

But for the lucky 44,000 a year who are resuscitated and survive, the outlook is much better than expected, authors of a new study say.

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Krulwich Wonders...
11:39 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Let's Get Literal: Calculating Pi With Pies. Actual Pies

Movies
11:33 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Whatever Happened To The Real Gingers And Rosas?

The '60s London of the unhappy adolescent Ginger (Elle Fanning, with Annette Bening's mentoring May) was more complicated than students Ginger's age understand today. Film writer Ella Taylor, who lived through that decade, came late to an understanding of the toll it took on young women like Ginger.
A24

A few weeks ago, I asked a class of college undergraduates what the 1960s meant to them.

"That flower-power thing?" one young man volunteered brightly.

The further we get from that misunderstood decade, the more the many strands of its rebelliousness get reduced to a pop-culture T-shirt slogan, a cartoon strip starring tie-dyed youth with stoned eyes and floor-mop hair.

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NPR Story
11:31 am
Thu March 14, 2013

New Pope, New Ground

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 12:03 pm

Following celebrations for the historic election of Argentine Pope Francis, it's time to look at the business of leading the world's 1.2 billion Catholics — bureaucracy and all. Host Michel Martin discusses the Pope's future agenda with Reverend Jose Hoyos, of the Diocese of Arlington, and religion professor Anthea Butler.

The Papal Succession
11:24 am
Thu March 14, 2013

In Argentina, The New Pope Has Many Supporters, And A Few Critics

Pope Francis — then Argentine Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio — on Ash Wednesday in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Feb. 13.
Juan Mabromata AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 2:18 pm

The 266th pope, and the first ever from Latin America, has one lung, rides the subway, reads Dostoevsky and has been described as both a moral compass and a silent accomplice to Argentina's former Dirty War leaders.

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On Aging
11:08 am
Thu March 14, 2013

An Age-Old Problem: Who Is 'Elderly'?

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:51 pm

When exactly does someone become elderly?

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The Salt
11:01 am
Thu March 14, 2013

It's Russian Mardi Gras: Time For Pancakes, Butter And Fistfights

A man dressed as a skomorokh, a medieval East Slavic harlequin, distributes bliny in St. Petersburg, Russia, during the last day of Maslenitsa, March 1, 2009.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 1:36 pm

Nothing says party like pancakes and butter. At least, not if you happen to be in Russia this week.

The country is in the midst of celebrating Maslenitsa, an Eastern Slavic folk holiday that takes place the week before the start of Russian Orthodox Lent (this year, it starts March 18). Though now tied to the Christian calendar, Maslenitsa has roots in ancient Slavic sun worshippers — it originally marked the end of winter and advent of spring. And, like Mardi Gras, it involves a whole lot of feasting before the Lenten fast — with blinis, a Russian pancake, as the food of choice.

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Co-Founder Of Khmer Rouge Dies; Ieng Sary Escapes Judgment For Genocide

Ieng Sary.
Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

The death of Ieng Sary, co-founder of the Khmer Rouge that ruled Cambodia from 1975 to 1979 and killed an estimated 1.7 million of that nation's people in the process, has dashed the hopes "among survivors and court prosecutors that he would ever be punished for his alleged war crimes," The Associated Press writes.

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