World

Middle East
4:56 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Israel's E1 Project Could Disrupt Travel For Palestinians In West Bank

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:19 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As we just heard, Palestinians have condemned the E1 settlement project, saying it would effectively cut the West Bank in two. Israeli officials dismiss that criticism, and they say that there are alternative routes for Palestinians who want to travel between the northern and southern parts of the West Bank.

Well, Sheera Frenkel explored those alternatives.

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Guns In America: A Loaded Relationship
4:56 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

What's Worked, And What Hasn't, In Gun-Loving Switzerland

Gun enthusiasts take part in a shooting competition at a club outside Zurich. The gun culture is deeply entrenched in Switzerland, where citizens as young as 10 learn to shoot.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 8:34 pm

Switzerland has an entrenched gun culture that is embraced by most of its 8 million citizens, some of them as young as 10 years old.

Every Swiss community has a shooting range, and depending on who is counting, the alpine country ranks third or fourth in the number of guns per capita.

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Europe
4:56 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Cyprus's Lawmakers Reject Bank Deposit Tax, Tangling Bailout Negotiations

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:51 pm

In Cyprus, the parliament is wrestling with a European Union-imposed plan that would seize at least 10 percent of the bank savings of wealthy people and possibly 7 percent from everyone else, to help defray the cost of bailing out Cypriot banks. On Tuesday, lawmakers voted against a modified version of the plan.

Sports
4:56 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Dominican Republican, Puerto Rico Face Off In World Baseball Championship

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. It is the first all Caribbean final. Tonight, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico are facing off in the World Baseball Classic in San Francisco. And for more on the big game and Major League Baseball's quest to make the sport more international, we're joined now by NPR's Tom Goldman, who is in San Francisco covering the event. Hi, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

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Middle East
4:56 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Syrian Rebels Describe Fight As Revolution For Justice, Not A Civil War

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:51 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

The world must acknowledge that Syria is going through a revolution for justice and freedom, not a fight between two teams. That message today from the new interim prime minister of the opposition Syrian National Coalition. 50-year-old Ghassan Hitto will now attempt to form an interim government as violence continues across the country. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul.

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Middle East
4:56 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Egyptian And Syrian Presidents Find No Friend In Jordanian King

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:19 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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The Salt
4:49 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Cash Back On Broccoli: Health Insurers Nudge Shoppers To Be Well

A shopper at a branch of South African retailer Pick n Pay in Johannesburg. Health insurer Discovery offers rebates on health food at the chain to its members who enroll in a health promotion program.
SIPHIWE SIBEKO Reuters /Landov

At $2.50 a pound, broccoli may seem too expensive. But cut the price by 25 percent, and our thinking about whether we should buy it may change.

A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine concludes that rebates on healthy food purchases lead to significant changes in what people put in their grocery carts.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Statue Of Liberty Will Reopen July 4th, Says Parks Service

A sea shell rests on a wall surrounding the Statue of Liberty, in New York in November. Tourists in New York will miss out for a while on one of the hallmarks of a visit to New York, seeing the Statue of Liberty up close. Though the statue itself survived Superstorm Sandy intact, the storm damaged buildings and Liberty Island's power and heating systems.
Richard Drew AP

The National Park Service is almost finished with extensive repairs at the Statue of Liberty site and they expect to reopen it to the public by July 4th.

The damage was caused by Hurricane Sandy. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar said in a statement that the hurricane damaged docks, the energy infrastructure on Ellis Island and crippled the security screening system.

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It's All Politics
3:59 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Assault Weapons Ban Is Gun Debate's First Casualty

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., has been told that her assault weapons ban will not be included in the Democratic gun bill to be introduced on the Senate floor in the coming weeks.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 4:48 pm

The prospects of an assault weapons ban emerging as part of any post-Newtown gun control law looks highly unlikely after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid opted not to include it in a Democratic proposal to be offered on the Senate floor in coming weeks.

"My understanding is it will not be [part of the base bill]" to be introduced on the Senate floor, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said after meeting with Reid on Monday, according to Politico. "The leader has decided not to do it."

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The Two-Way
3:48 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

WATCH: After 'Fascist' Accusations, Ukrainian Parliament Brawls

Ukrainian opposition and majority lawmakers fight around the rostrum during the session of parliament in Kiev, Ukraine, on Tuesday.
Sergei Chuzavkov AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 4:49 pm

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Middle East
3:44 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

'We Survived Iraq': An Iraqi Makes A New Home In North Carolina

Ali Hamdani was a doctor in Iraq before becoming a translator for NPR. He now lives in North Carolina.
Lourdes Garcia-Navarro NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:51 pm

Ten years after the Iraq War began, NPR is catching up with people we encountered during the conflict. Back in 2008, NPR's armored car was targeted with a so-called sticky bomb in Baghdad. Ali Hamdani, an Iraqi who worked for NPR as a translator and producer, narrowly escaped. Shortly afterward, he left Iraq for the Unites States as a refugee.

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Mountain Stage
2:59 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Iris DeMent On Mountain Stage

Iris DeMent performs live on Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu March 28, 2013 10:51 am

Singer-songwriter Iris DeMent makes her eighthappearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va. DeMent grew up in rural Arkansas with 14 brothers and sisters, immersed in gospel music and traditional country.

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Middle East
2:53 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Israelis, Palestinians Spar Over Controversial Settlement

A Jewish settler looks at the West Bank settlement of Maaleh Adumim from the E-1 area on the eastern outskirts of Jerusalem on Dec. 5. The Israelis are planning a controversial housing project in E-1.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Originally published on Sun March 24, 2013 9:19 am

In practical terms, a project known as E-1 would provide 3,000 or so new housing units for Israelis in an area between east Jerusalem — which the Palestinians hope will someday be their capital — and the large Israeli settlement of Maaleh Adumim.

But numbers can be deceiving: Palestinians are renewing their objections to the growing number of Israeli settlements, and many fear E-1 could tip the balance in a way that makes an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement impossible.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:43 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Marches Madness: High-Stepping To Scott Joplin

Mezzo-soprano Grace Bumbry (center) in a 2010 production of Scott Joplin's Treemonisha at the Châtelet Theater in Paris.
Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 2:16 pm

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SXSW: Live From Austin
2:11 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Molotov, Live In Concert: SXSW 2013

Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 10:02 am

  • Molotov, Recorded Live At Auditorium Shores

Politics and rock en Español go hand in hand, and Mexico City's Molotov is a flag-waver for that combination. The band formed in 1995 during an era in which seismic political changes transformed Mexican society; from the start, Molotov's music pointed fingers at economic and political institutions — and even aging rock stars.

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Europe
2:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

The Ripple Effects Of Cyprus' Financial Crisis

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:42 pm

Cyprus lawmakers rejected a $13 billion bailout package that included controversial taxes on bank deposits. The proposed tax would have helped to pay for the bailout of crumbling banks. NPR's Marilyn Geewax explains how the events in Cyprus could affect the global economy and what may happen next.

Remembrances
2:09 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

A Ballet Memorial To A Son Killed At War

Dancer Josh Burnham plays the role of Colin Wolfe in the Manassas Ballet Theatre production Colin.
Melanie Beus Photography

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 1:32 pm

Colin Wolfe was killed in Iraq in August 2006. A roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle in Anbar province just a few weeks after he arrived. He was one of almost 4,500 U.S. service members killed in Iraq between 2003 and 2012. Nearly seven years later, on the heels of the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, his mother paid tribute to her son with a ballet.

"You're taking something which is horrible ... and turning it into something which is beautiful and life-affirming," Amy Wolfe tells NPR's Lynn Neary. "That's the way art is."

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The Two-Way
1:50 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Malala, Pakistani Teen Shot For Demanding An Education, Heads To School In U.K.

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl shot in the head by the Taliban, attends her first day of school on Tuesday just weeks after being released from the hospital.
Malala Press Office AP

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 1:53 pm

Some terrific news today: Malala Yousafzai's story has come full circle. If you remember, the Pakistani teenager was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman because she was in favor of girls receiving an education.

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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Hey Punxsutawney Phil, What Happened To That Early Spring?

The sign says one thing. The snow pile says another. In Boston on Tuesday, a woman walked between a store sign heralding the start of spring and a snow pile still lingering from this winter's storms.
Brian Snyder Reuters /Landov

"An early spring for you and me."

So said Punxsutawney Phil back on Groundhog Day (Feb. 2.) — which, if our math is right was, 6+ weeks ago.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

Flush With Oil, Abu Dhabi Opens World's Largest Solar Plant

Rows of parabolic mirrors at the Shams 1 plant in Abu Dhabi.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 2:34 pm

Abu Dhabi, the most oil-rich of the United Arab Emirates, is now home to the world's single-largest concentrated solar power plant.

The 100-megawatt Shams 1 plant cost an estimated $750 million and is expected to provide electricity to 20,000 homes, according to the BBC.

Why, you might ask?

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