World

Political Crisis In Egypt
4:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt's Military 'A Builder, A Liberator And Savior'

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 5:29 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Some historical context now to the overthrow of Egypt's President Mohammed Morsi. When the military stepped in last week, Western news headlines blared military coup. But those in Egypt who support the military's action argue that this is something different, not a takeover, but a rescue. To understand that view, we went looking for some background.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Political Crisis In Egypt
4:52 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt's Religious Minorities Want Role In New Constitution

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 5:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. There is growing discord in Egypt among those who backed the militaries removal of the country's elected Islamist president. At the heart of the divide is Egypt's controversial constitution. The document, which is heavily influenced by Islamic law, was written by allies of former President Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood from which he hails.

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Shots - Health News
4:36 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Bros Get Wasted; Girls Get Tipsy: Why Boozy Talk Matters

Man, you are going to get wasted. The words drinkers choose to describe their behavior may say a lot about the risks they face.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:11 am

Guys can really get hammered, can't they? I mean, totally trashed. Not me. I may have gotten a little buzzed at that birthday party, but that's it.

The words people use to describe their drinking behavior can say a lot about how they perceive drinking, a perception that may not match reality, researchers say.

And the language may also reveal risks that may not be obvious to the drinkers themselves.

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The Salt
4:28 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

The Science Of Twinkies: How Do They Last So Darned Long?

Unlike the dodo that sits next to it on an NPR Science Desk shelf, this year-and-a-half-old Twinkie is still around — but that doesn't mean you want to eat it.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:56 pm

We have to confess: When we heard that Twinkies will have nearly double the shelf life, 45 days, when they return to stores next week, our first reaction was — days? Not years?

Urban legend has long deemed Twinkies the cockroaches of the snack food world, a treat that can survive for decades, what humanity would have left to eat come the apocalypse. The true shelf life — which used to be 26 days — seems somewhat less impressive by comparison.

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Parallels
4:23 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

It's Not Just The Middle East With Quirky Booze Laws

Indiana still has some of the strictest laws governing alcohol sales in the United States, including a prohibition against all carryout alcohol sales on Sundays. Here, Bill Cheek, an employee at Kahn's Fine Wines and Spirits in Indianapolis, puts labels on cases of beer.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 5:22 pm

As astute commentators pointed out in an earlier Parallels post about the vagaries of getting a drink in the Middle East, that isn't the only place where the laws regulating alcohol are more than a touch confusing, or where there's debate over them.

Some Americans don't need to look any further than their own local bar.

Commenter Glenn Zanotti shared his perspective:

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The Two-Way
4:22 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Pleads Not Guilty To 30 Federal Counts In Boston

MIT police officers stand at attention outside a federal courthouse where Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 counts today. He is also accused in the death of MIT officer Sean Collier.
Winslow Townson AP

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:47 am

Appearing in the same Boston federal courtroom as many of the victims of the bombings at the Boston Marathon, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 counts Wednesday, during an arraignment hearing.

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NPR Story
4:21 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Lawmakers Express Concern About U.S.-Chinese Pork Deal

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 5:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Members of the Senate Agriculture Committee had a lot of questions today about the takeover of Smithfield Foods. That's because a Chinese company has offered to buy America's largest pork processor. Both Democratic and Republican senators have expressed concerns about the $4.7 billion deal and its potential effects on U.S. food safety and security.

NPR's John Ydstie has been following the testimony today and joins us now. Hi, John.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

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The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Report: Upside-Down Sensors Toppled Russian Rocket

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

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Shots - Health News
3:28 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Mastermind Of 'Body Stealing' Scheme Dies

In 2008, Michael Mastromarino was sentenced in a New York City courtroom for enterprise corruption, body stealing and reckless endangerment.
Jesse Ward AP

Dr. Michael Mastromarino died Sunday after battling liver and bone cancer. He was 49.

Mastromarino pleaded guilty to "body stealing." In 2008, he was sentenced to up to 58 years in prison.

But he continued to insist that he'd been misunderstood. He spoke to NPR, working with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, last year from a prison near Buffalo, N.Y.

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Landmark Paris Mansion Is Damaged By Fire

Firemen battle flames at the 17th century Hotel Lambert early Wednesday in Paris.
Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:06 am

Paris' historic Hotel Lambert, once home to the likes of Voltaire and Chopin, was partly damaged by fire early Wednesday.

The BBC reports that the 17th-century structure lost a section of its roof and a central staircase and saw water and smoke damage to celebrated fresco paintings by Charles Le Brun, who also designed the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles.

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World Cafe
2:33 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Charles Bradley On World Cafe

Charles Bradley.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:02 am

  • Listen To Charles Bradley On World Cafe

Soul man Charles Bradley knew he could sing — former band members and friends always told him that. But he just never got the shot, shuttling from one odd job to another. Into his 50s, Bradley was living with his mother in New York and performing as a James Brown interpreter under the name "Black Velvet." When Daptone Records co-founder Gabriel Roth saw him perform, this soul man finally got his shot at fame.

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The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Illinois Is 50th State To Legalize Carrying Concealed Weapons

Illinois became the last state in the U.S. to legalize carrying concealed weapons after state lawmakers overrode a veto by Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn.

Tuesday's votes — 41-17 in the Senate and 77-31 in the House — came just before a federal appeals court deadline to pass a form of concealed-carry.

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Planet Money
2:16 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Banks, Borrowed Money And Bailouts

Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

A proposed new rule would force big banks to rely less on borrowed money, and more on money that belongs to the banks themselves.

This rule has lots of interesting context, which includes words and phrases such as Basel, capital ratios, and risk-weighting. But here's the nub of it.

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Parallels
2:15 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

That Blows: Cricket's Trumpet-Playing Superfan Silenced

Former England cricketer Geoffrey Boycott listens to Barmy Army trumpeter Billy Cooper during the second test between New Zealand and England at Basin Reserve on March 15 in Wellington, New Zealand. Cooper's trumpet will be silent at Trent Bridge, in Nottingham, England, because the ground doesn't allow musical instruments.
Gareth Copley Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 4:42 pm

The English national character is an eternal mystery. But from time to time we get a glimpse of some of its components. The story of Billy The Trumpet is one such occasion.

Billy is the embodiment of English eccentricity. He belongs to a boisterous ragtag band of sports fans called the Barmy Army. They're considered "barmy" for very good reason: These people follow England's national cricket team everywhere.

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Displacement Can Last A Lifetime For Many Refugees

A Syrian refugee boy, right, sits outside his tent next to his family at a temporary refugee camp in the eastern Lebanese town of Marj near the border with Syria, Lebanon, Monday, May 20, 2013. (Hussein Malla/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 10:05 am

According to a recent report by the United Nations, more than 45 million people worldwide were forced to flee their homes in 2012 — the highest number of refugees in nearly two decades.

People leave their homes for many reasons, including war and violence, environmental disaster and persecution. More than half of the refugees worldwide came from five countries, according to the UN: Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Sudan and Syria.

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

A Jedi Knight In Queen Elizabeth's Court

Cover art from "William Shakespeare's Star Wars." (Quirk Books)

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:50 pm

What if William Shakespeare had written Star Wars? Well now we know!

Ian Doescher, author of “William Shakespeare’s Star Wars: Verily, A New Hope” pulls back curtain on the eternal question: what does a wookie sound like in Elizabethan English?

Book Excerpt: ‘William Shakespeare’s Star Wars’

By: Ian Doescher

BIGGS: Make haste, O Luke. Methinks they do approach

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NPR Story
1:46 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Spain's Population Declines Amid Economic Crisis

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:50 am

The economic crisis in Spain, where the unemployment rate is a record 27 percent, is forcing people to leave the country to look for work.

The BBC’s Tom Burridge reports the birthrate in Spain is also falling, because couples believe they can’t afford to have children under the economic circumstances.

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Shots - Health News
1:43 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

When Choirs Sing, Many Hearts Beat As One

Members of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir raise their voices in unison — and perhaps unify their heart rates, too.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:33 am

We open our hymnals to Hymn 379, and we begin to sing. "God is Love, let heav'n adore him / God is Love, let earth rejoice ..."

Lifting voices together in praise can be a transcendent experience, unifying a congregation in a way that is somehow both fervent and soothing. But is there actually a physical basis for those feelings?

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It's All Politics
1:32 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Once A Rising GOP Star, Virginia's Governor Hits The Skids

Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell won one of two governorships that the GOP picked up in 2009.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 4:00 pm

Just last year, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell was a hot Republican prospect, ranked among the nation's most respected state leaders, and was touted as prime vice presidential material.

Those heady days are long gone.

After a seemingly endless series of reports about alleged ethical lapses by the buttoned-down, fiscally conservative governor, no one talks about his political promise anymore.

Instead, the rumor mill generates talk of his impending resignation, with the governor's spokesman denying via Twitter a weekend blog report that he would step down from office.

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The Picture Show
12:54 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

In American Street Art, Mandela's Face May Rise Again

MLK Jr. mural at Mr. Toy, W. Madison Street at Cicero Avenue, Chicago, 1991. Painted by Mr. Toy's son.
Courtesy of Camilo Jose Vergara

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 2:28 pm

There's no easy way to portray the scope of Camilo Jose Vergara's photos with photos. To do so would require processing "many hundreds of thousands" of images (the estimate he once gave me) that document several cities over several decades. It's overwhelming.

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