World

Asia
3:24 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Belly Dancing For The Dead: A Day With China's Top Mourner

Dingding Mao is a professional mourner, who is paid for her talents at singing the funeral dirge. This is a tradition that began in the Han dynasty 2,000 years ago.
Courtesy of Wu Peng

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 11:39 am

File under "one of the oddest jobs ever": professional mourner. China's funeral rituals date back 2,000 years to the Han dynasty, but were banned during the Cultural Revolution as superstition. Now these funeral rituals have become an income source to a select few who stage funeral extravaganzas, marrying ancient Chinese traditions with modern entertainment.

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Kitchen Window
12:03 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Helping Pasta Salad Dress For Success

Deena Prichep for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 3:08 pm

So many people have the wrong idea about pasta salad — that staple of the summertime picnic season. It's a complete dish (often with starch, vegetable and protein all together), it's happy to hang out in your basket for several leisurely hours without complaint and it doesn't require much more than a fork to enjoy al fresco. Far too often, though, it's just done wrong.

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The Two-Way
7:10 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Google Reader Replacement Race: Feedly And Digg Reader Make Waves

An image shows the new Digg Reader, built as an option to replace Google Reader. The RSS subscription service will be discontinued on July 1, Google says.
Digg

With just days remaining before Google pulls the plug on its Reader RSS feed service, reality is sinking in. And the market for free or low-cost replacements is growing, as Digg has rolled out its new reader in the past week. Other companies report a burst of new customers after Google's announcement that it would discontinue its RSS system on July 1.

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It's All Politics
6:58 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Voting Rights Ruling Could Open Lawsuit Floodgates

Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia Democrat who as a 1960s civil rights activist risked his life for voting rights, expressed disappointment with the Supreme Court VRA decision.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 4:14 pm

It didn't take long after the news broke about the Supreme Court's 5-to-4 decision tossing out a key piece of the Voting Rights Act for the fears of voting advocates, or the hopes of VRA critics, to be realized.

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The Two-Way
6:41 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Astronomers Find Trio Of 'Super-Earths' Around Nearby Star

An artist's impression of one of the super-Earth's surrounding the star Gliese 667 about 22 light years from Earth.
ESO/L. Calçada

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:45 am

New observations of a fairly well-studied star have revealed a system with at least six planets, three of which are in the star's habitable zone. This is the first time that three such planets have been spotted orbiting in this zone in the same system.

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Business
6:21 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Nostalgia Products: Making A Tasty Comeback

Customers hoarded Twinkies when Hostess announced it was going out of business in 2012.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Mad Men's suave advertising executive Don Draper may have said it best: "Nostalgia: It's delicate ... but potent."

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This Is NPR
6:10 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'Talk of the Nation' Memories: We Changed Almost Everything

Scott Cameron is the senior editor at Talk of the Nation.
Jacques Coughlin NPR

All this week, we are remembering our favorite moments from the 21-year-run of Talk of the Nation. With so many driveway moment-inducing interviews, hours of live breaking news, segments with familiar voices, and insights from audience members, it's hard to know where to start. So we asked a few of those who worked on Talk of the Nation over the years to share a story or two.

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The Salt
6:10 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Paula Deen's Sons Speak Up, But Her Empire Further Crumbles

Carlo Allegri AP

It's been a downward spiral for Paula Deen since news of her deposition testimony as part of a racial discrimination suit went public last week.

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Middle East
6:05 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Dozens Dead After Clashes With Radical Cleric In Lebanon

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 1:46 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Calm has been restored in southern Lebanon for now. Clashes between the army and followers of a radical Sunni cleric have left dozens dead over the past two days. It's been called the most violent spillover from the conflict in Syria to a neighboring country. And now, a manhunt is under way for that cleric, Ahmed al-Assir.

NPR's Kelly McEvers traveled from Beirut to the scene of the violence today in Sidon, also known as Saida in Arabic.

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Afghanistan
6:05 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Taliban Attack In Kabul Comes Ahead Of Peace Negotiations

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Today in the Afghan capital, Kabul, there was a coordinated assault on the diplomatic green zone. Men in at least two vehicles bluffed their way into a secure area before detonating bombs and getting into a firefight with government security forces. Three security guards were killed, as well as all of the attackers.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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This Is NPR
6:02 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

The Curious Listener: Listeners Say Goodbye To 'Talk Of The Nation'

Katie Burk NPR

A two-way dialogue is important in any conversation, especially when you are discussing compelling issues. Over the past two decades, Talk of the Nation has been part of public radio's national conversation with listeners, gathering perspectives and insights into the latest headlines and developments in science, education, religion and the arts.

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The Two-Way
4:30 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

NOAA: A Rare Tsunami Hit The East Coast Earlier This Month

A radar image of the storm complex that may have caused the tsunami.
NOAA

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says a 6-foot wave that hit the East Coast earlier this month was a rare tsunami.

The West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center said the source of the wave is "complex and under review," but they believe it was caused by a strong storm and perhaps even the "the slumping at the continental shelf east of New Jersey."

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NPR Music Essentials
4:18 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

NPR Music's 25 Favorite Albums Of 2012 (So Far)

Stephanie d'Otreppe NPR

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 3:07 pm

The albums that made the first half of our year came at us from every direction (often, more than one at a time). We've collected our favorites into a handy little list that we're happy to share with you today.

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The Salt
3:06 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

How Well Do You Know Your Fish Fillet? Even Chefs Can Be Fooled

Jessica McConnell, 26, of Silver Spring, Md., tries to identify halibut, red snapper and salmon at a dinner hosted by Oceana and the National Aquarium in Washington, D.C.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 12:42 pm

In the world of seafood, looks can be very deceiving. And unfortunately for anyone who buys fish, it's easy for people above you in the supply chain to sell you something other than what you want.

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Middle East
2:56 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Saudi Arabia Solidifies Support Of Syrian Opposition

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

'Let The Fire Burn': A Philadelphia Community Forever Changed

Throughout the '70s and '80s, the radical African-American MOVE organization had several dramatic encounters with police.
Courtesy of Amigo Media

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:05 pm

On May 13, 1985, after a long standoff, Philadelphia municipal authorities dropped a bomb on a residential row house. The Osage Avenue home was the headquarters of the African-American radical group MOVE, which had confronted police on many occasions since the group's founding in 1972.

The resulting fire killed 11 people — including five children and the group's leader, John Africa — destroyed 61 homes, and tore apart a community.

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The Two-Way
1:41 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Cardboard Bike's Fundraiser Is Rolling

The cardboard bicycle.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

A quick update for the many who seemed fascinated by Israeli inventor Izhar Gafni's cardboard bicycle and his bid to bring it to the world:

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Putin: NSA Leaker Is A 'Free Person' At Moscow Airport

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the presidential summer residence Kultaranta in Naantali, Finland on Tuesday.
Kimmo Mantyla AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 5:53 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin appeared to rebuff the United States when he said NSA leaker Edward Snowden was in Moscow but is a "free person" who is "entitled to buy a ticket and fly to wherever he wants."

Snowden, Putin said, is in the transit zone of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport and has neither crossed the Russian border nor "committed any crime" on Russian soil.

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Germany Says It's Uncovered Terrorist Plot Using Model Planes

German officials say they've uncovered a radical Islamist plot to use remote-controlled model airplanes packed with explosives to carry out terrorist attacks in Germany.

Police carried out nine predawn raids in southern and eastern Germany as well as Belgium in search of evidence of what prosecutors allege was a plan for a "serious, state-threatening act of violence." There were no arrests.

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The Salt
11:26 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Will GMOs Help Protect Ugandan Families Against Hunger?

A woman sells bananas at the Kampala Airport. Ugandans eat about a pound of the fruit, on average, per day.
Ronald Kabuubi AP

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 1:45 pm

While a few states in the U.S. are debating mandatory labels for genetically modified foods, some African nations are considering a bigger question: Should farmers be allowed to plant genetically modified crops at all?

The question carries extra weight in countries like Uganda, where most people are farmers who depend on their own crops for food.

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