World

The Two-Way
9:45 am
Tue July 16, 2013

After Controversy, David Petraeus Will Now Earn $1 Teaching

Former Central Intelligence Agency Director, David Petraeus, in Sept. 2011.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:21 am

Former CIA Director Gen. David Petraeus has decided to take a huge pay cut. The former commander of the allied forces in Iraq and Afghanistan will now make $1 to teach a course at City University of New York's honors college.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Snowden Asks For Temporary Asylum In Russia, Says Lawyer

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:20 am

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor who leaked a cache of classified documents about U.S. surveillance programs, officially filed for temporary asylum in Russia on Tuesday, a human rights lawyer and WikiLeaks say.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
7:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Lost And Found: 5 Forgotten Classics Worth Revisiting

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:25 pm

I don't remember when I first realized that books could go away, that they could — and did — pass into obscurity or out of print. Myra Breckinridge by Gore Vidal, All About H. Hatterr by G.V. Desani, Speedboat by Renata Adler, the sublime An Armful of Warm Girl by W.M. Spackman. Each of them, snuffed out. It seemed a scandal. But I vividly recall becoming aware that particular books were prone. To take chances with language or form was to court extinction.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

For The Love Of The Game: How Cricket Transformed India

Cricket Game
iStockphoto.com

The English language and cricket were Britain's two largest colonial legacies in India, says journalist James Astill, but it is the second of these bequests that is the subject of his important and incisive new book, The Great Tamasha: Cricket, Corruption, And the Turbulent Rise of Modern India. Astill is a former bureau chief for the Economist in New Delhi, and he notes the parallels between the country's control of cricket and its dramatic economic rise.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Last Words: An Author's Rhymed Farewell

David Rakoff was a radio essayist for public radio's This American Life.
Deirdre Dolan

What a loss. That's the thought that kept running through my head as I flagged one inspired rhyme after another in David Rakoff's risky (though hardly risqué) posthumous first novel. Why risky? For starters, Rakoff, who died of cancer last summer, at 47, chose to write this last book in verse — albeit an accessible, delightful iambic tetrameter that is more akin to Dr. Seuss than T.S. Eliot.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Tue July 16, 2013

In Egypt, More Clashes Leave 7 Dead, Hundreds Injured

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block the Six October bridge on Tuesday in the center of Cairo.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:00 am

After what had been a week of calm, violence returned to the streets of Cairo late Monday into early Tuesday.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports that Egypt's health ministry said seven people were killed and more than 200 were injured as supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi clashed with police. From Cairo, Leila filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Latin America
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Vicious Cartel Leader Arrested In Mexico

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:05 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

One of the most brutal and vicious cartel leaders in Mexico has been arrested. Early yesterday morning, Mexican marines, caught the leader of the notorious Zeta gang organization. The country has killed or captured dozens of kingpins in recent years without managing to bring an end to the high murder rates in many areas.

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Middle East
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Syrian Refugees Caught Up In Egypt's Political Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 3:27 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Egypt, the ouster of President Mohammad Morsi has changed things - not just for Egyptians but also for another group of Arabs living in that country. It's a story of how when one group falls from grace, so do those who are perceived to be its supporters. Under the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt was a safe haven for Syrians fleeing the war in their country.

Now, as NPR's Kelly McEvers reports from Cairo, the power shift in Egypt is putting Syrians in danger.

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Business
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Investigators In London Probe Boeing 787 Fire

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:21 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Investigators in London are continuing to probe the cause of last Friday's fire onboard a parked Boeing 787 - the plane known as the Dreamliner. They're examining what role the emergency locator transmitter might have played.

That device is made by Honeywell - and as NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports, the company has sent technical experts to assist in the investigation.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: The emergency locator transmitter, or ELT, sends out a digitally encoded signal after a crash, and says aviation analyst Scott Hamilton...

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Business
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Car Sales In Europe Drop To A 20-Year Low

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:21 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Europe stalling.

Car sales in Europe are at a 20-year low. The European Automobile Manufacturers' Association calculates this based on the number of car registrations in a given period. For June, registrations were down more than 6 percent compared to a year earlier. Analysts say the EU's high unemployment rate is to blame.

Books News & Features
3:17 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Use The Books, Fans: 'Star Wars' Franchise Thrives In Print

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:56 am

There's been a frenzy of excitement since last year when Disney bought Lucasfilm, creator of the Star Wars franchise, and announced it would make more Star Wars movies. Fans are eagerly awaiting hints of what might happen next in the story, and one way the franchise keeps fans interested is through a pantheon of Star Wars books, the latest of which is Troy Denning's Star Wars: Crucible.

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Animals
3:16 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Om Nom Nom: T. Rex Was, Indeed, A Voracious Hunter

Mind The Teeth: Fossils indicate that Tyrannosaurus rex was an active hunter, in addition to being a scavenger. And in Jurassic Park, it also had a sweet tooth for lawyers.
Universal Pictures Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 10:44 am

Tyrannosaurus rex is perhaps one of the most famous animals to have ever roamed the Earth. This huge, fierce meat-eater has graced Hollywood films as the perpetual villain, and it has played a notorious role in the science community that studies it, too.

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Shots - Health News
3:15 am
Tue July 16, 2013

South Africa Weighs Starting HIV Drug Treatment Sooner

A woman waits to get AIDS drugs on April 8 at a clinic in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, about 55 miles north of Johannesburg. New WHO guidelines say patients should start HIV treatment much earlier, before they become extremely sick.
Stephane de Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

The World Health Organization has issued revised guidelines saying that people with HIV should be put on antiviral drugs far earlier than was previously recommended. The hope is that most patients would get started on treatment before they begin to get extremely sick.

It's a move that could have huge implications for African nations where millions of people are infected with HIV. In South Africa roughly 5.5 million people are living with HIV — more than any other country in the world. South Africa also has more people in treatment than anywhere else.

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Food
3:12 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Cook Your Cupboard: Chowchow Down With Jacques Pepin

Samantha Lunn in Chattanooga, Tenn., wants to know what to do with currants, pickled onions and chowchow.
Courtesy of Samantha Lunn

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

This is an installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, an ongoing food series about working with what you have on hand. Have a food that has you stumped? Share a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites. The current submission category: Booze!

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Robert Randolph Ushers In Steel-Guitar Soul With 'Lickety Split'

Robert Randolph & The Family Band's new album, Lickety Split, is out Tuesday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:22 am

The 33-year-old frontman of Robert Randolph & The Family Band has strong roots in gospel music. As a kid, he grew up attending the House of God church in Orange, N.J. That's where he first played the "sacred steel" guitar, a driving force behind the band's soulful new album, Lickety Split.

In the 1920s, African-American Pentecostal churches began using the steel guitar in place of an organ. From there, it became an instrument that helped usher in a new gospel style.

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It's All Politics
6:13 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Reid's Limited Senate Options Lead To 'Nuclear' Threat

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid warns that if Republicans don't relent on filibusters, they will leave him no choice but to change the chamber's rules.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:23 pm

Sen. Harry Reid may sound a tad hypocritical to some for saying he now supports changing Senate rules in order to end the one that says 60 senators must approve before presidential nominations can get up or down votes. This comes only several years after he indicated he opposed changing the requirement to a simple 51-vote majority.

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The Two-Way
6:05 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Feds Unlikely To Prosecute Zimmerman, Former Prosecutors Say

In Los Angeles on Sunday, demonstrators expressed their anger over the acquittal of George Zimmerman on the charges he faced for the death of Trayvon Martin.
Jim Ruymen UPI /Landov
  • On 'All Things Considered': NPR's Carrie Johnson and Audie Cornish

Looking ahead after the not guilty verdict in the trial of George Zimmerman for the death of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin — a case that reignited the national discussion about race relations:

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It's All Politics
5:45 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

'Stand Your Ground' Laws Under Scrutiny Post-Zimmerman Verdict

George Zimmerman (right) is congratulated by his defense team Saturday night after being found not guilty of murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
Gary W. Green AP

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:47 am

George Zimmerman's defense team didn't invoke Florida's "stand your ground" defense in winning his acquittal of murder in last year's shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

But the specter of the 2005 law loomed, inescapably, over the proceedings.

It was inevitable that the racially fraught trial would again catapult Florida's law — which extends protections for the use of deadly force far beyond the traditional bounds of one's home — as well as those in 21-plus states with similar self-defense measures into the nation's consciousness.

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The Record
5:45 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

Sub Pop's Silver Jubilee Celebrates 25 Years Of Artisanal Music In Seattle

Touch Me I'm A Local Institution: Mudhoney plays from more than 500 feet above Seattle, on the roof of the Space Needle, as part of a set celebrating Sub Pop's Silver Jubilee broadcast by KEXP
Morgen Schuler KEXP

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 7:38 am

Last Thursday Mark Arm was on the top of the Space Needle; two days later, he was riding around in a golf car full of trash. Truth in criticism: I never actually saw the Mudhoney singer in the vehicle to which his name was affixed (the sign read: "MR. ARM") scooting around the streets of Georgetown, the Seattle industrial neighborhood where Sub Pop Records held its Silver Jubilee mini-festival on Saturday. But I did see it hauling recyclables and getting stopped by numerous concertgoers snapping phone photos.

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The Salt
5:32 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

In Argentina, Coca-Cola Tests Market For 'Green' Coke

Coca-Cola Life, a new product being rolled out in Argentina with a green label, is being marketed as a "natural" and therefore lower-calorie cola.
Coca-Cola

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 6:40 pm

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