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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

For Kids This Summer, How Safe Is Too Safe?

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:37 pm

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir.

It's summertime, and that means no school. Kids can play, explore and climb all day long, which means an added challenge for parents who want to keep their kids out of harm's way.

In the past few years, major cities like New York and Philadelphia have been renovating playgrounds to make them safer so kids can play hard and their parents can rest easy.

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Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

No Clear Answers On Cause Of Commercial Jet Crash

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:37 pm

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir.

Coming up, we'll hear from a long-haul commercial pilot. He'll talk about his experiences. First, though, NPR's Laura Sydell joins me from San Francisco with the latest news on the crash. Hi, Laura.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: Hi there.

SHEIR: So investigators have been looking into this crash now for more than 24 hours. Can you tell us what they found so far?

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Africa
4:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

What Does Egypt's Coup Say About Nation's Democracy?

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:37 pm

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

As Egypt grapples with its future, an important question arises: Did Mohammed Morsi's ouster represent an undoing of the democratic process, or was it a victory for freedom and the voice of the people?

Our next two guests have considered that question and have two very different perspectives. Maha Azzam is associate fellow at the International Affairs think tank Chatham House. And Raghida Dergham is columnist and senior diplomatic correspondent for Al-Hayat.

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Africa
4:58 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

After President's Ouster, Egypt Braces For More Unrest

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:37 pm

Transcript

REBECCA SHEIR, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rebecca Sheir.

In Egypt tonight, two sides at loggerheads about what's best for the country are turning out their supporters.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

SHEIR: That sound from Tahrir Square in the heart of Cairo where hundreds of thousands of opponents of deposed President Mohammed Morsi are rallying. In other parts of the city, Egyptians are coming out to call for Morsi's return to power.

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Author Interviews
4:51 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

How 'Dancing In The Street' Became A Protest Anthem

In November 1964, Betty Kelly, Martha Reeves and Rosalind Ashford (aka Martha Reeves and the Vandellas) were at the top of the charts with their hit "Dancing in the Street."
AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:37 pm

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The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Russian Lawmaker: Venezuela May Be Last Chance For Snowden

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 4:57 pm

A prominent member of Russia's parliament is adding to pressure on former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden to leave Russia.

AS NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, Alexei Pushkov, the head of the foreign affairs committee in Russia's parliament, said on Twitter that Venezuela is waiting for an answer from Snowden, adding that this might be the 30-year-old computer analyst's last chance to receive asylum.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Andy Murray Wins Wimbledon Men's Championship

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now for more on Wimbledon, let's go to the men's single final, which Andy Murray of Great Britain has won. He beat the top-seeded Novak Djokovic in straight sets. Murray is the first Brit to win the tournament in 77 years, with the last champion Fred Perry taking the title way back in 1936.

Sports Illustrated correspondent Jon Wertheim was watching it all from Center Court from the All England Club, and he joins me now.

So, Jon, was this a big upset?

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Deports Radical Cleric To Jordan

Muslim Cleric Abu Qatada arrives home after being released from prison in London on Nov. 13, 2012.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Britain has deported a radical Muslim cleric top his homeland, Jordan, where he appeared in court Sunday and was formally charged with terrorism-related offenses.

Abu Qatada was first arrested in Britain in 2001 over alleged terrorist links. He was rearrested in 2005.

The 53-year-old cleric was held at a prison in southeast London, and was taken from there to the airport at midnight Sunday. The BBC reports that he was accompanied on the flight by "six people from Jordan, comprising three security officials, a psychologist, a medical examiner and his Jordanian lawyer."

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The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Murray Beats Djokovic To Win Men's Title At Wimbledon

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven-decade men's title drought Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven decade men's title drought at Wimbledon on Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.

Murray won 6-4, 7-5, 6-4 in a hard-fought 3-hour, 9-minute match, which the Associated Press noted, was "filled with long, punishing rallies and a final game that may have felt like another 77 years, with Murray squandering three match points before finally putting it away after four deuces."

Here's more from the AP:

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The Two-Way
1:15 pm
Sun July 7, 2013

Mob Brutally Kills Soccer Referee After Player Is Stabbed And Killed

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 1:25 pm

Brazilian police have made an arrest in a grisly incident during a soccer match, in which a referee's leveling of a red card penalty set off a clash with a player that resulted in the player's death and ended with the official being brutally killed.

The killings occurred during an amateur game last Sunday, June 30, in Maranhão, a state in Brazil's northeast that is west of Recife.

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The Two-Way
11:37 am
Sun July 7, 2013

BBC, Radio Announcer Apologize To Wimbledon Champ Bartoli

France's Marion Bartoli celebrates her Wimbledon women's singles championship. The BBC has apologized to Bartoli for remarks an announcer made about her appearance.
Dominic Lipinski PA Photos/Landov

The BBC and one of its radio tennis commentators are apologizing to Marion Bartoli, after announcer John Inverdale's remarks about the 2013 Wimbledon champion's appearance angered many listeners.

Bartoli, 28, reached a milestone in her life Saturday, by winning the women's singles final at Wimbledon. And that's the perspective she kept after learning of Inverdale's unflattering remarks, in which he suggested that her father might have told Bartoli that she needed to work hard to overcome the fact that she was "never going to be a looker."

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Runaway Train Explosion Still Ablaze In Quebec

Firefighters douse flames after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Megantic in Canada's Quebec province on Saturday.
Francois Laplante-Delagrave AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 8:25 am

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Rivals Rally In Cairo As Egypt Uncertainty Continues

State media and other sources had confirmed Saturday that Mohamed ElBaradei, the former head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, would be Egypt's interim prime minister. Later in the day, the president's spokesperson walked it back.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:27 pm

(This story was last updated at 4:16 p.m. ET)

Egyptians remain deeply divided about which direction their country should go as supporters and opponents of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi are turning out Sunday to voice their opinions in separate rallies.

NPR's Greg Dixon filed this story for our Newscast Unit:

"Hundreds of thousands of opponents of deposed President Morsi have come here, Tahrir Square, in the center of Cairo to show their support for the toppling of his government.

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NPR Story
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Memories Served Dish By Dish

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Soft boiled eggs and buttered toast - it may not be something you need to follow a recipe to make and not perhaps the most memorable dish you've ever had, but soft boiled eggs and buttered toast have the power to connect author Kate Christensen to another time and place. Christensen has written a new memoir. It's called "Blue Plate Special." And in it, she includes recipes and talks about the foods that connect her to different chapters of her own life.

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NPR Story
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Britain Appears Ready to Approve New IVF Procedure

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Britain is the country where the first test tube baby was born. Now, the United Kingdom is considering another groundbreaking - and controversial - fertility procedure. The British government appears ready to legalize a process in which a baby is conceived with the genetic material from three people. The science goes like this. Inside every mother's egg cells are all of her genes. All her DNA is packed inside the nucleus. And when she has a child, her DNA gets passed down.

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NPR Story
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Ireland May Allow Limited Abortions

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:21 pm

Politicians in the Catholic Republic of Ireland have overwhelmingly voted to introduce abortion in cases where the woman's life is in danger or she is at risk of suicide. John Waters, columnist for the Irish Times, speaks with Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin about this sensitive issue.

NPR Story
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Civil War Surgeon Set The Standard For Battlefield Medicine

Jonathan Letterman followed in his father's footsteps when he became a surgeon.
Courtesy Arcade Publishing

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 3:11 pm

July 1 marked 150 years since the beginning of the Battle of Gettysburg, a crucial victory for the Union and a turning point in the Civil War. But it came at an enormous cost to both sides — thousands of soldiers were killed and tens of thousands more were wounded.

However, it might have been even worse had it not been for a surgeon named Jonathan Letterman, who served as the chief medical officer of the Union's Army of the Potomac. He presided over some of the bloodiest battles in U.S. history and, over the course of a single year, revolutionized military medicine.

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Middle East
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Sexual Assaults Reportedly Rampant During Egypt Protests

The bridge leading to Tahrir Square in Cairo was quiet Saturday morning, but activists say more than 100 women were sexually assaulted during protests there last week.
Hiro Komae AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:31 pm

From afar, Tahrir Square appears almost festive as protesters chant against the Islamist president who was overthrown by the Egyptian military last week. But inside the crushing crowds, the scene can be a lot more sinister.

In a video posted by the Muslim Brotherhood, an unidentified woman cries out as men attack her. The group, from which former President Mohammed Morsi hails, claims the attack occurred in Tahrir Square in late June.

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NPR Story
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Syrian Opposition Elects New Leader

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to stay in the Middle East, turning out attention now to Syria, where the main opposition coalition has a new leader. During meetings in Istanbul, opposition leaders elected Ahmad al-Jarba, who has close ties to Saudi Arabia. The change comes as civilians in Syria's central city of Homs are facing a fierce government assault. NPR's Peter Kenyon has more.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: After another two-day Syrian Coalition meeting had spilled over into a third day with more to come, spokesman Khaled Saleh had some news.

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NPR Story
6:41 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Will Egypt's Fragile Democracy Stick?

Originally published on Sun July 7, 2013 2:21 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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