World

NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

The Rowing Team That Stunned the World

This photo from the 1936 Olympic Games shows the University of Washington eight-oar boat (top) crossing the finish line just ahead of second-place Italy and third-place Germany. (University of Washington Libraries, Special Collection)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

In 1936, a rowing team from the University of Washington stunned the world by winning a gold medal in eight-oar crew at the Berlin Olympics in front of a crowd that included Adolph Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

The sons of American loggers, farmers and shipyard workers defeated elite European teams, grabbing the attention of millions of Americans and transforming the sport.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

How To Shoot Photos Of Fireworks

Bill Sandidge, left, and Nancy Koughan, of Decatur, Ga., watch a fireworks display on the field following a baseball game between the Chicago Cubs and the Atlanta Braves, Wednesday, July 4, 2012, in Atlanta. (David Goldman/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:47 pm

Spectacular firework displays are the grand finale of big Fourth of July celebrations.

Boston Globe freelance photographer Aram Boghosian will be at Boston’s Charles River Esplanade for tonight’s event and has some tips for how to take great photographs.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

'House Jackers' Work To Save Homes From The Next Sandy

Greg Patterson shovels dirt near the foundation of a home that he and his father are elevating eight feet. (Tracey Samuelson/WHYY)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

The Fourth of July is one of the busiest times of the year on the Jersey Shore. Of course this year, many communities are still recovering from Superstorm Sandy.

Determined to be prepared for the next big storm, some property owners are lifting their homes and businesses higher above sea level.

The people who do this work are called “house jackers.” And they are in high demand these days.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Meningitis Vaccination Effort Aimed At Gay Men

Allen Smith, 21, from West Hollywood, Calif., gets a free vaccine against bacterial meningitis at the AIDS Healthcare Foundation in West Hollywood, Calif., Monday, April 15, 2013. (Damian Dovarganes/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

There have been 22 cases in the past three years of a deadly new strain of meningitis that has spread in New York’s gay, bisexual and MSM (men who have sex with men) communities.

Seven of the men who contracted the illness died.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Boston's 4th Celebration Brings More Security

Security officials check bags as people pass through a check point on their way to Boston's Fourth of July celebrations. (Lynn Jolicoeur/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

Cities across the country are beefing up security for their July 4th celebrations, since it’s the largest public event since the Boston Marathon bombings.

In Boston, in addition to more police, National Guard members will be manning security checkpoints. And if you look up, you’ll see more security cameras, too.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Fred Bever from WBUR in Boston reports on the increased security, and concerns being raised by the American Civil Liberties Union.

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NPR Story
1:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Summer Of 1776 Set The Stage For Independence

This undated engraving shows the scene on July 4, 1776, when the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, Pa. (AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

As we celebrate the birth of the nation on this 4th of July, Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian Joseph Ellis joins us to look back on events of the summer of 1776.

That’s when the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress.

Ellis’s new book is “Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence (excerpt below).”

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NPR Story
1:41 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

The Day After In Egypt

Egypt's chief justice Adly Mansour prepares to swear in as the nation's interim president Thursday, July 4, 2013. (Amr Nabil/AP)

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 6:02 pm

Egyptians woke up with the question today — what happens after you depose a democratically elected government?

That was of course the government headed by Mohammed Morsi — a member of the Islamist political group the Muslim Brotherhood — removed from office yesterday by the country’s military.

Part of the answer to what’s next came from Adly Mansour, chief justice of the country’s Supreme Court, after he was sworn in today as interim president.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
12:58 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Avishai Cohen's Triveni With Anat Cohen On JazzSet

Anat Cohen (left) performs with Avishai Cohen (center) at the Newport Jazz Festival.
Ayano Hisa for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 10:38 am

Anat Cohen leads the Anzic Orchestra (Anat + music = Anzic), and Anzic opens this JazzSet by letting "Samba de Orfeu" morph into "Struttin' With Some Barbecue." Cohen loves both Brazilian and New Orleans music, and connects them with ease. "Struttin'" features the trumpet section one man at a time, concluding with Avishai Cohen. Later in the show, Anat will be back.

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World Cafe
12:45 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Galadrielle Allman On Her Father's Work In 'Skydog'

Duane Allman of The Allman Brothers Band lived to play music. A new box set, Skydog, collects the work he produced before his death in 1971.
John Gellman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:06 am

In 1971, Duane Allman — one of the greatest slide guitarists of all time — died at age 24. His daughter, Galadrielle Allman, was only 2 at the time. Here, she joins World Cafe to present music from the lovingly curated Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective.

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World Cafe
12:45 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club On World Cafe

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club.
Courtesy of Stephen Kallao

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:07 am

  • Listen To Black Rebel Motorcycle Club On World Cafe

Recorded live at the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club recently performed a special stripped-down session for World Cafe. The band appears as a trio, playing songs from its latest album, Specter at the Feast. In 2010, lead singer Robert Been's father Michael died of a heart attack while Black Rebel Motorcycle Club was on tour; this is the group's first release since his death.

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Mountain Stage
10:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Jonathan Edwards On Mountain Stage

Stephan Hoglund Mountain Stage

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 9:47 am

Singer-songwriter Jonathan Edwards makes his second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of the North House Folk School in Grand Marais, Minn. Edwards opens with the song for which he's best known: his infectious Top 5 hit from 1972, "Sunshine." He's backed by the Mountain Stage band for all but the final song of his set, the rousing "This Island Earth," which he sings a cappella. When he finishes, host Larry Groce tells the audience, "If you think he's not a good singer, try singing that one yourself."

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Parallels
9:45 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Where The Mask Seen In Global Protests Is Made

A woman cleans Guy Fawkes masks, used by many demonstrators in protests around the world and in the recent wave of demonstrations in Brazil, at a factory assembly line in Sao Goncalo, near Rio de Janeiro, June 28.
Ricardo Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:42 am

Remember the mask from protests here ...

... here ...

... and here?

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Top Stories: Crisis In Egypt; Assad's Confidence

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 10:30 am

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The Picture Show
8:08 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Happy Fourth Of July!

Children play with sparklers, July 4, 1940
Keystone View/FPG Getty Images

The Picture Show wishes you a happy holiday. Take lots of fireworks photos!

Code Switch
8:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

A BBQ Rub That Tastes Like Brooklyn

The spices were created by analyzing recipes and correlating ingredients with census data.
Courtesy of Hanna Kang-Brown

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 2:02 pm

The Fourth of July is America's favorite holiday to get together, grill barbecue, and celebrate what it means to be American. It's also probably our best opportunity to debate whose barbecue is the best. With its regional varieties, the rubs-vs.-sauce debates and the fiercely guarded recipe secrets, arguing about barbecue is almost an American pastime. Few foods better demonstrate the diversity of our country.

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Egypt Begins Dangerous New Phase As Interim Leader Steps In

People dance and cheer in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4, the day after former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 11:09 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo
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A Blog Supreme
7:44 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Patriotism And Protest: Jazz For July 4

Louis Armstrong spoke out against the federal government regarding racial issues, but happily played the National Anthem at Newport in 1960.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:41 am

Jazz music has become a point of pride for the United States of America: a homegrown art form forged from folk traditions. But jazz recordings of American patriotic songs aren't abundant. Perhaps because many of jazz's foremost creators were black Americans who lived in a society which actively discriminated against them, many didn't think to tackle that material.

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This Is NPR
7:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Happy Independence Day, From NPR

Katie Burk NPR

It's simple, we just want to wish you a happy holiday weekend from NPR, wherever your taste buds take you.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

A Tale Of The Estranged And The Just Plain Strange In 'New School'

Dash Shaw is a graphic novelist and animator whose previous books, including Bottomless Belly Button and Bodyworld, seethe with dark, mischievous intent. He sets out to unsettle, using the unique tools the comics medium provides to expose discomfiting truths about relationships both familial and romantic. A proud experimentalist, Shaw often shuns tidy narrative conventions in favor of raw emotion.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

City, Comedy And Calamity In Cathleen Schine's New Novel

Apartment building in Greenwich Village
iStockphoto.com

Cathleen Schine can always be counted on for an enticing, smart read, and her latest novel, Fin & Lady, is no exception, but it's an odd duck, as quirky as its peculiarly named titular half-siblings. Neither as sparklingly funny as her most recent book, The Three Weissmanns of Westport, nor as brainy as her earlier Rameau's Niece, Fin & Lady is light, entertaining, and ultimately moving, but you can't help wondering what Schine hoped to achieve with it.

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