World

NPR Story
4:44 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Book Review: 'The Mehlis Report'

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 6:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Our book reviewer Alan Cheuse is excited to introduce the work of Rabee Jaber. He lives in Lebanon, and his novel "The Mehlis Report" takes place there. In Beirut, the characters await the real Mehlis report, which analyzed the watershed moment in Lebanon, the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri.

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Planet Money
4:39 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

An MIT Project That Lets You Spy On Yourself

This is my (Gmail) life.
immersion.mit.media.edu

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:54 am

Of all the stuff on metadata I've seen in the past few weeks, this is my favorite:

It's my favorite in large part because it's my metadata. It comes from my Gmail account. The relationships it maps are, more or less, my life — orange circles for Planet Money, purple for Brooklyn, brown for college. The big red circle that gets cut off at the bottom of the screengrab is my mom.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:29 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

An Atheist Monument Rises In Florida

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 5:10 pm

As NPR reported over the weekend, the first monument to atheism erected on government property in the United States has been dedicated in Florida.

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The Two-Way
3:29 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Top Vatican Bank Officials Resign

Ernst von Freyberg, president of the Vatican Bank Institute for Works of Religion, or IOR, talks with The Associated Press during an interview June 10 at his office in Vatican City. He was named the bank's interim director on Monday after the director and the deputy director both resigned.
Domenico Stinellis AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 8:42 pm

Two top officials of the Vatican bank resigned Monday just days following the arrest of a senior cleric with ties to the institution after police caught him with the equivalent of about $26 million in cash that they say he was trying to bring into Italy from Switzerland.

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The Salt
2:48 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Experimental Treatment For Milk Allergy May Not Last

Researchers are learning more about how to treat milk allergy by giving kids a small amount of milk protein, but it needs further study.
MICHAEL PROBST ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 5:22 pm

One out of every 13 children has a food allergy, but the affliction still regularly stumps doctors. As Kari Nadeau, director of the Stanford Alliance for Food Allergy Research, told Terry Gross in April on Fresh Air, researchers still don't understand what "flips the switch between a food allergen versus a food nutrient in children."

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The Two-Way
2:28 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Nelson Mandela Is In Critical But Stable Condition, In Latest Update

A family brings a message of good wishes for former South African President Nelson Mandela outside his house in Johannesburg Monday. Mandela, 94, is in critical but stable condition.
Stephane De Sakutin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:07 am

The condition of former South African leader Nelson Mandela is "still critical but stable," according to the office of President Jacob Zuma. Mandela, 94, has been in a Pretoria hospital since June 8 with a lung infection.

In the first official update on Mandela's health since Thursday, the presidency also urged people to prepare for the beloved rights activist's birthday later this month.

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Tiny Desk Concerts
2:03 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Laura Mvula: Tiny Desk Concert

Laura Mvula performs a Tiny Desk Concert on May 15, 2013.
Marie McGrory NPR

Originally published on Mon December 23, 2013 6:24 pm

Listen to Laura Mvula's terrific full-length debut, Sing to the Moon, and you'll hear soulful pop music in Technicolor. The U.K. singer's sonic ambition is boundless: Her intricately layered songs straddle genres, locations and eras in ways that sound entirely original.

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The Salt
1:48 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Famous St. Paul Sandwich (of St. Louis)

This exists.
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:28 pm

Since Sandwich Monday began, certain sandwiches have been our white whales: the Hippogriff Burger, a Reuben signed by J.D. Salinger, an Actual White Whale sandwich. Also, the mysterious St.Paul sandwich, native to St. Louis: It's an egg foo young patty, with lettuce, pickle and mayo, on white bread. But we finally caught one.

Miles: This is the same sandwich my Model U.N. group made the first time we all got high together.

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Krulwich Wonders...
1:40 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

A Beautiful Notion: That Caterpillars Killed Off The Dinosaurs

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 11:52 am

For the last hundred years, scientists have been wondering why the dinosaurs disappeared so quickly. Was there one key reason, or several?

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Shots - Health News
1:25 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

HIV Treatment Should Start Even Earlier, WHO Says

Women in Bangalore, India, make red ribbons at an HIV support center in November 2012.
Manjunath Kiran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:10 pm

Getting people on HIV drugs even before they get sick helps them live longer and slows the spread of virus, the World Health Organization said Sunday.

The number of new HIV infections has dropped by 20 percent worldwide since the push to expand HIV treatment worldwide began in 2002. The medications prevented about 4 million deaths from AIDS-related problems in developing countries, the WHO report says.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:09 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Chest Hair, Breast Milk And Human Disgust

Commissioned by Wing-Co. for an ad campaign, the maker of this coat says it contains over one million strands of male chest hair.
Wing-Co.

Would you wear a coat made entirely of male chest hair?

As part of an advertising campaign to cast a new chocolate milk drink as a "manly" beverage, the British branch of an international dairy company commissioned the "Man-Fur Coat," created from chest hair donated by 300 male volunteers.

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Parallels
12:48 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

With A New Emir, Will Qatar Keep Its Outsized Role?

Qatar's former emir, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, is shown last week in the capital, Doha, shortly before he stepped down on June 25 in favor of his 33-year-old son. Such voluntary abdications are exceedingly rare in the Gulf.
Bertrand Langlois AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 2:57 pm

Qatar's capital, Doha, is a post-modern city rising like a mirage out of the hot sands of the Arabian Desert. The ever-growing skyscrapers are stunning, and in some cases, head-scratching works of architecture and engineering. Standing in the city, you almost expect to see the Jetsons fly by.

Qatar is also doing something unusual when it comes to leadership. The 61-year-old emir, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, stepped down last week and handed power to his 33-year-old son, Sheik Tamim.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Obama Calls For Collaborative Ties With Tanzania

President Obama and Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete take questions at a joint news conference Monday in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:40 pm

President Obama kicked off the final leg of his visit to Africa with a stop Monday in Tanzania, saying that he wants the U.S. relationship with the East African nation to be a collaborative one based on development and democracy.

"Tanzania is a close partner, as the president [Jakaya Kikwete] indicated, on almost all our major development initiatives, and this reflects our confidence in the people of Tanzania," Obama said in Dar es Salaam.

Obama and Kikwete were expected to discuss trade with business leaders who are traveling with the president.

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Planning For The Apocalypse: One Necessity

You've seen the lists of Things to Hoard Before the Apocalypse.

Nearly every survivalist checklist includes fresh water and nonperishable food. Gold is on a lot of lists. As well as weapons.

For visionary Joel Garreau, one of the most important items that many preppers forget is ... toilet paper.

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Barbershop
10:59 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Can America Learn From Foreign School Systems?

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 1:45 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for a visit to the barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. We're here in Aspen for the Aspen Ideas Festival, and we couldn't get into the shop, so we brought the shop to us.

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The Two-Way
10:48 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Serena Williams Stunned At Wimbledon By Unheralded Lisicki

Defending champion Serena Williams lost to Sabine Lisicki of Germany 6-2 1-6 6-4 in the fourth round of the Wimbledon Championships.
Andy Rain EPA /Landov

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 12:24 pm

It's been a graveyard for top seeds at Wimbledon: Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer, Maria Sharapova all ousted in the first week of the tournament. On Monday, it was defending champion Serena Williams' turn.

Reuters reports:

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Parallels
10:34 am
Mon July 1, 2013

To The Dismay Of Kenyans, President Obama Will Just Fly By

When Barack Obama was a U.S. senator in 2006, he visited Kenya, the homeland of his father. He's shown here planting a tree with Wangari Maathai, a Kenyan who won the Nobel Peace Prize. He is not stopping in Kenya on his current African tour, however, a decision that has upset many Kenyans.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 2:29 pm

President Obama arrived in Tanzania on Monday, and that's the closest he'll get to his father's homeland on his African tour, a decision that has upset many Kenyans.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Egypt Unrest Grows As Protesters Storm Ruling Party Office

An Egyptian protester looks at the damaged Muslim Brotherhood headquarters in Cairo. Protesters stormed and ransacked the headquarters early Monday, in an attack that could spark more violence as demonstrators gear up for a second day of mass rallies.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 8:51 pm

(This post was updated at 2:05 p.m.)

Egypt's military has given President Mohammed Morsi and anti-government protesters 48 hours to resolve their differences, failing which it has threatened to put forward "a roadmap" for the country.

It's not clear what that means or whether the generals will take over, which the statement put forth Monday indicated they had no interest in doing. But many Egyptians — for and against the president — are interpreting it to mean that Morsi will be forced to step down like Mubarak was in 2011.

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Mountain Stage
9:48 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Chris Hillman And Herb Pedersen On Mountain Stage

Stephan Hoglund Mountain Stage

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 2:25 pm

Chris Hillman and Herb Pedersen make their second appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of the North House Folk School in Grand Marais, Minn. As members of The Byrds, The Dillards, The Flying Burrito Brothers and the Desert Rose Band, Hillman and Pedersen have been part of the fabric of American music for nearly half a century.

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The Two-Way
9:34 am
Mon July 1, 2013

EU Officials Question Kerry On 'Unacceptable' Spying Claims

European Union officials spoke to Secretary of State John Kerry about claims that the U.S. spied on EU offices in America. Kerry is in Brunei for a security conference.
Roslan Rahman AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 11:18 am

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is hearing from European allies who are upset with recent reports that the U.S. has spied on its friends. The European Union's top diplomat asked Kerry about the reports at a security conference Monday. Other officials say the case could derail talks on free trade.

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