World

The Thistle & Shamrock
2:36 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

The Thistle & Shamrock: At The Edge

Solas is featured in this week's episode.
Courtesy of the artist

Hear music with an evolving Celtic roots sound, inspired by jazz and classical arrangements and driven by contemporary and worldly rhythms. This week's episode includes music from Solas, Scrüj MacDuhk and John Rae.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music
2:32 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

What's On Your Road Trip Playlist?

All Things Considered host Robert Siegel in a 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air, undoubtedly rocking out to his own road trip playlist.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 8:32 pm

Just in time for Memorial Day and the unofficial start of summer, we present the All Things Considered road trip playlist.

We asked on social media for the songs listeners must hear on a long summer drive, and we received hundreds of suggestions. You can listen to some of them here via our Spotify playlist.

Read more
NPR Story
2:29 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Oregon Looks To Raise Wages For People With Intellectual Disabilities

Workers with All Seasons Grounds Care at the City of McMinnville Water Reclamation Facility. (Chris Lehman/Northwest News Network)

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 1:26 pm

As the national debate on whether to raise the minimum wage continues, some adults in Oregon with developmental disabilities are still paid as little as 25 cents an hour.

Now, a group of Oregon lawmakers is trying to change that. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Chris Lehman reports.

Read more
NPR Story
1:59 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

ISIS Gains Ground In Iraq And Syria

A view of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra one day after the self-proclaimed Islamic State fired rockets into the city on May 17, 2015. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon May 25, 2015 1:26 pm

ISIS is expanding its control of territory in Iraq and Syria. The militants have now seized the last Syrian-controlled border crossing between Syria and Iraq.

There are also reports that ISIS has overrun another town in Iraq’s western Anbar province, less than a week after taking control of Ramadi, the provincial capital.

Concerns are mounting about the famous archaeological site at Palmyra in Syria, which ISIS seized a couple of days ago.

Read more
NPR Story
1:59 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Wal-Mart Calls On Suppliers To Treat Farm Animals Better

Wal-Mart, the country’s largest food retailer, is calling on its thousands of suppliers in the U.S. to treat farm animals better, and give them fewer antibiotics.

The guidelines are voluntary, but Wal-Mart wants suppliers to report on their progress in an annual report and on company websites.

The news comes as Wal-Mart faces pressure from the animal rights group Mercy for Animals, which had found mistreatment of pigs at certain farms that supply pork to Wal-Mart.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Who Let The Dogs In? We Did, About 30,000 Years Ago

Josh Brones walks his hunting dogs, Dollar (from left), Sequoia and Tanner, near his home in Wilton, Calif., in 2012.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 7:36 pm

It looks like dogs might well have been man's (and woman's) best friend for a lot longer than once thought.

The long-held conventional wisdom is that canis lupus familiaris split from wolves 11,000 to 16,000 years ago and that the divergence was helped along by Stone Age humans who wanted a fellow hunter, a sentry and a companion.

Now, DNA evidence suggests that the split between dogs and their wild ancestors occurred closer to 30,000 years ago.

Read more
NPR Story
1:43 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Beatification Of Oscar Romero Marks Turning Point For Catholic Church

A mural of Roman Catholic Archbishop Oscar Romero decorates a wall where students sit in a plaza in Panchimalco, El Salvador, Thursday, May 21, 2015. (Salvador Melendez/AP)

Oscar Romero, the late Archbishop of San Salvador, will be beatified on Saturday. Beatification is the last stage before sainthood, and the ceremony marks an end to one of the most divisive debates in Catholicism in the past 35 years.

The church and El Salvador have been deeply divided over Romero, who identified with the poor and spoke out against El Salvador’s brutal right-wing military regime.

He was assassinated in 1980, shot in the heart while he was saying mass.

Read more
NPR Story
1:42 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

It's Only Getting Worse: California Farmers Consider Historic Cuts

Farmer Joe Del Bosque (L) talks with a worker on April 23, 2015 in Firebaugh, California. As California enters its fourth year of severe drought, farmers in the Central Valley are struggling to keep their crops watered and many have opted to leave acres of the fields fallow. ( Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Some farmers in California are considering a deal that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago. Farmers who have water rights dating back as far as the Gold Rush era have been able to hold onto their water shares, even when others have been forced to give up theirs.

But a group of these farmers in the fertile Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is worried that regulators will take their water this year, so they’ve offered the state a deal. They will voluntarily give up 25 percent of their water now if the state will promise not to take any more this year.

Read more
NPR Story
1:27 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

2015 Shaping Up To Be An El Niño Year

A map shows sea surface temperatures on May 21, 2015. El Niño is characterized by unusually warm temperatures in the Pacific and affects global temperatures and rainfall. (NOAA)

Forecasters first declared El Niño conditions in early March of this year, noting warm ocean temperatures across the tropical Pacific. The most recent forecast shows a weak to moderate El Niño, and that it’s likely to persist for much of the year.

Read more
NPR Story
1:13 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

The Brave New World Of 'Editing' Human Genes

(Image: NIH)

The bioscience world is abuzz about a new gene technology so powerful it’s sparking debate about whether humankind should tinker with its own gene pool. Carey Goldberg from Here & Now contributor WBUR reports.

Read more
NPR Story
1:13 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

'All Souls Trilogy' Author Deborah Harkness

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 2:29 pm

Deborah Harkness used her background as a history of science professor to write the the hugely successful “All Souls Trilogy.”

The books are set in a world where witches, vampires and demons live alongside humans, and center around the romance of Diana, a reluctant witch, and Matthew, a vampire who’s 1,500 years old.

Read more
NPR Story
1:13 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

The Ad That Ushered In An Era Of Tough-On-Crime Politics

[Youtube]

In 1987, the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune newspaper in Massachusetts wrote this about a local criminal case: “The question everyone wants answered is how a cold-blooded murderer ever got out in the first place.”

One year later, the entire nation was asking the same question because of this 30-second television ad (above).

Read more
World Cafe
1:08 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

West Philadelphia Orchestra On World Cafe

West Philadelphia Orchestra with interloping World Cafe host David Dye (ensousaphoned, right).
Rich McKie WXPN

We've got something quite different as our Sense of Place: Philly series continues. Philadelphia has a brass band called The West Philadelphia Orchestra. They specialize in Balkan music, and as they were rehearsing a number of years ago, a singer was passing by who knew the music they were playing from growing up — and she joined the band. Petia Zamfirova will be the first to say this eclectic group is not just about backing her singing. We'll find out how this band grew here, hear about their selection in the All Songs Considered Tiny Desk Concert contest and more.

Read more
Monkey See
12:54 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: For 'Mad Men' And Letterman, A Week Of Goodbyes

Jon Hamm as Don Draper.
Michael Yarish AMC

This week's taping presented us with a few conundrums: Host Linda Holmes had already begun her vacation, while I know jack-all about the seven accumulated seasons of Mad Men, whose finale we were duty-bound to discuss. Our solution involved a pair of our most beloved guest panelists — Gene Demby and, from a studio in L.A., Barrie Hardymon — and a brief interregnum in poor Linda's vacation. (I stayed home and ate snacks.)

Read more
The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

Some Clinton Emails Were Retroactively Classified

The State Department is releasing 296 emails from Hillary Clinton's email account during her tenure as secretary of state. The correspondence relates to the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:12 pm

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

Emails released Friday by the State Department appear to confirm Hillary Clinton's assertion that she received no classified information on her personal email account while she served as secretary of state. Still, some of the emails were classified at the FBI's request after the fact — something the White House says is not uncommon.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:21 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

#NPRReads: Social Concern And The Drought In California

Sprinklers water a lawn in Sacramento, Calif.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

#NPRreads is a feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we bring you four reads.

From reporter Sam Sanders:

Read more
Goats and Soda
12:03 pm
Fri May 22, 2015

A Desk That Can Take A Ton Of Earthquake Rubble

Still standing: The earthquake-proof desk can withstand 2,200 pounds dropped on top of it.
Courtesy of Ido Bruno

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 3:02 pm

Call it the little school desk that can.

At 57 pounds, the desk in question is light enough for two students to carry and move around the classroom. At $35 per student, it's affordable enough for many school districts to buy in bulk. And oh yes, tests have shown it can survive a crushing weight of 1,000 kilograms (2,200 pounds) or more.

In other words, this desk can withstand an earthquake — and potentially save students' lives in the process

Read more
NPR Story
11:22 am
Fri May 22, 2015

The Recipients

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

GLYNN WASHINGTON, HOST:

Welcome back to SNAP JUDGMENT, from PRX and NPR, "The Weight Of The World" episode. Today, we're peering into the lives of people who are carrying an unexpected burden. And sometimes the heaviest weight is one we choose for ourselves.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Read more
NPR Story
11:22 am
Fri May 22, 2015

The Red Lantern

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

GLYNN WASHINGTON, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
11:22 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Shot in the Dark

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

GLYNN WASHINGTON, HOST:

Read more

Pages