World

Movie Reviews
5:01 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

A Yearly 'Purge' For A Society Working Out Its Issues

Ethan Hawke's security consultant barricades himself in his home for the annual "purge" that keeps the grimmer elements of society in check in James DeMonaco's dystopian thriller.
Daniel McFadden Universal Pictures

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:54 am

The best twists in The Twilight Zone weren't the ones that came at the end. The real genius of Rod Serling's classic series was how often and how effectively it twisted things up with simple but outlandish "What if?" queries in episode setups.

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Movie Reviews
5:01 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Resnais' Lively, Metatheatrical Look At Death

Sabine Azema (left) and Pierre Arditi are two of the veteran actors drawn into a convoluted retelling — and reimagining — of the Orpheus and Eurydice story in Alain Resnais' You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet.
Kino Lorber

As a relatively young man, French director Alain Resnais made films about loss, remembrance and the ghosts of a recent history that included the Holocaust, Hiroshima and the brutal Franco-Algerian war. He was 89 when he directed his latest film, You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet, which also considers the presence of the past. But the director's concern with real-life horrors has been replaced here by an outlook that's both playful and explicitly theatrical.

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The Two-Way
4:57 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Police In India Arrest Three In Alleged Rape Of U.S. Tourist

Indian police stop a tourist bus on Wednesday at a checkpoint put in place after the alleged rape of an American woman in the northern town of Manali.
AFP/Getty Images

Police in India say they've arrested three men in connection with the alleged gang rape of an American woman in northern India earlier this week.

The unidentified suspects, aged 22 and 23, were arrested Thursday near Manali, police officer Vinod Dhawan was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

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Music Reviews
4:39 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Peter Pan And Don Quixote Find The 'Home Of Song'

Paul Spring's first album of family music draws from his own childhood, as well as that of Mark Twain.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

I remember my youthful summers as a time of reading and exploration — diving into books, seeing new places and rediscovering nearby ones. After listening to Home of Song, the first album of family music from Minnesota singer Paul Spring, I think we spent summers in much the same way.

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The Two-Way
4:21 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

WATCH: Rep. Trey Gowdy Gets Emotional During IRS Hearing

Faris Fink, commissioner of the IRS Small Business and Self-Employed Division, walks away after testifing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, on Capitol Hill, on Thursday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

On Thursday, the House Oversight Committee held a hearing looking into an Inspector General's report that found lavish spending on conferences by the IRS.

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The Salt
4:15 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

When You Waste Food, You're Wasting Tons Of Water, Too

A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer in Florida City, Fla. Much of the lost and wasted weight in fruits and vegetables is water, according to a report by the World Resources Institute.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:29 pm

Tossing out food is clearly a waste of money — and maybe even immoral, according to Pope Francis, who on Wednesday likened food waste to "stealing from the table of those who are poor and hungry." And as we've reported, you also may be creating extra greenhouse gas emissions by sending food to

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
4:11 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Remembering Mulgrew Miller On JazzSet

Mulgrew Miller at the Detroit Jazz Festival.
David Tallacksen WBGO

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:15 pm

The pianist Mulgrew Miller died on May 29, 2013, following a cerebral hemorrhage. The jazz world is grieving the loss of this "wonderful musician and great spirit," in the words of fellow pianist Kenny Barron. As saxophonist Loren Schoenberg so aptly says, "Mulgrew could levitate a bandstand."

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

IMF Vs. European Commission: Duel Over Financial Crisis

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Earlier this week, the International Monetary Fund came out with a scathing report about the way the Greek debt crisis was handled. It says European officials took too long to restructure Greece's debt because they were too concerned about protecting investors. Today, as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, European officials hit back.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Plan For Wind Turbines On Normandy Coast Spins Controversy

Omaha Beach near Colleville-sur-Mer in Normandy, France, where allied troops landed on June 6, 1944. A plan to build a wind farm off the coast has spurred controversy.
Lars Halbauer DPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Music accompanies a fireworks display set off behind an old German gun battery overlooking Omaha beach in Normandy. Next year, on the 70th anniversary of the allied invasion, work is set to begin on a windmill park off this very coast — 75 windmills, the closest of which will be 6 miles from shore.

The wind is whipping high on a bluff above the British landing beach of Arromanches, where the hastily constructed landing harbor is still intact. Environmental activist Amaury de Lencquesaing opposes the windmill project.

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NPR Story
3:55 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

The Changing Face, Perception Of Turkey's Prime Minister

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Clashes continue today in Turkey. On one side, police. On the other, protestors angry with what they consider the heavy hand of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Even the Black Sea province of Rize, where Erdogan hails from, has seen fighting. Once considered a model politician in a complicated region, Erdogan now faces the strongest challenge of his decade in office.

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Monkey See
3:51 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

When 'G' Movies Are For Kids, Do Kids Avoid 'G' Movies?

The 1939 film The Wizard Of Oz was rated G. The 2013 film Oz the Great and Powerful was rated PG. The difference? Maybe a little violence and a womanizing leading man.
AP/Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

If you're a parent with small children, summer is traditionally a time when there's lots for them to see at the multiplex. That's not untrue this summer. But if you're specifically looking for a film with a G rating, you may just be out of luck.

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The Salt
3:11 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

How To Clean Up Fish Farms And Raise More Seafood At The Same Time

Thierry Chopin from the University of New Brunswick examines a raft that holds strings of seaweed. The seaweed grows around pens of farmed salmon and soaks up some of the nutrients that would otherwise pollute the Bay of Fundy.
Richard Harris NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Last month, we told you about companies that are growing salmon on dry land. That's an effective — but expensive — way to reduce water pollution caused by fish farms. After all, marine aquaculture provides about half of the seafood we eat.

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Parallels
2:08 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

In Turkey, Protesters Proudly Call Themselves 'Looters'

Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Ankara on Tuesday.
Umit Bektas Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:59 pm

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has shown no sympathy for the tens of thousands of protesters who've taken to the streets across the country. In fact, he seems to have energized the protesters by calling them capulcu, or "looters" in Turkish.

Demonstrators have gleefully embraced the label, spreading it far and wide on social media and turning a local protest into an event that has attracted international attention.

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Middle East
1:30 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Looking Ahead To The Future Of Syria's Crisis

Originally published on Sun June 9, 2013 8:32 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan. The war in and around Syria grows more horrific and more dangerous day by day: tens of thousands dead, many more injured, over a million refugees in neighboring countries and who knows how many millions displaced inside Syria itself.

It's almost hard to remember the early days of what's now grown into a civil war. More than two years ago, NPR's Deborah Amos reported on activists hopeful that Syria would be changed by the Arab spring.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RADIO BROADCAST)

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The Salt
12:36 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Feeling A Little Blue May Mask Our Ability To Taste Fat

Feeling down? It could be messing with your ability to taste the fat in that carton of ice cream.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 4:00 pm

So, here's the scenario: You're feeling a little blue, then you watch an emotional movie and dig into a bowl of ice cream.

Are you aware of how fattening your comfort food is? Likely not. Especially in the moment.

A new study finds that temporary, strong emotions, like the sadness we experience from a weepy movie, can significantly decrease our ability to taste — or perceive — the amount of fat we're eating.

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Planet Money
12:13 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

NYT Excerpt: How Much Is Michael Bolton Worth to You?

Ilya S. Savenok Getty Images

In his latest New York Times Magazine column, Adam Davidson looks at the secret science of scalping tickets. Here's an excerpt:

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Shots - Health News
11:54 am
Thu June 6, 2013

How Nature Builds A Pandemic Flu Virus

A vendor weighs a live chicken at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last April. After closing live poultry shops in many cities around China, the rate of new H7N9 infections sharply declined.
Lam Yik Fei Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 8:26 am

Here's a sobering thought: Wild birds — including city pigeons and ubiquitous Canada geese — carry 170 different types of bird flu. You know, all those viruses with the Hs and Ns in their names, like H1N1 and H5N1.

Only a dozen of these viruses have infected humans so far, but many of those have been deadly, and three of them have caused global flu pandemics.

Does every bird flu that leaps into people have the potential to turn into the next "big one" that spreads rapidly around the world?

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Parallels
11:51 am
Thu June 6, 2013

Once Unsafe, Rio's Shantytowns See Rapid Gentrification

The small, hillside community of Babilonia, situated above the Leme and Copacabana neighborhoods in Rio de Janeiro, has ocean views.
Lianne Milton for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

A new gastronomic guide to Rio de Janeiro's shantytowns — for a cool $35 — has just been published. A new boutique hotel perched on top of one of Rio's previously most dangerous favelas is about to open. And yes, there is a jazz club and yoga, too.

These are new services catering to a new kind of favela resident.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:43 am
Thu June 6, 2013

The Fat-Shaming Professor: A Twitter-Fueled Firestorm

Geoffrey Miller's account was public before his "obese PhD applicants" tweet. Now it's protected.
Screenshot

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 12:45 pm

On Sunday, evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller, a professor currently on leave from the University of New Mexico with a visiting position at New York University, tweeted a comment that sent shock waves through academia and beyond:

Dear obese PhD applicants: if you didn't have the willpower to stop eating carbs, you won't have the willpower to do a dissertation #truth

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Ask Me Another
11:27 am
Thu June 6, 2013

There's An Apt For That

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 12:01 pm

Have you ever met a baker whose last name was Baker, or a blacksmith whose last name is Smith? Then you might be familiar with the term "aptronym," a word that refers to a person's name that happens to suit her job or characteristics. In this game, host Ophira Eisenberg asks contestants about people both real and fictional whose last names are aptly suited to their professions.

Later, house musician Jonathan Coulton covers "Poisoning Pigeons In The Park," a seasonal favorite by Tom Lehrer.

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