World

Africa
5:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Elected Leadership Struggles To Rule In Libya

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 6:03 pm

In Libya, guns are still everywhere and the elected leadership is struggling to rule as militias use guns and intimidation when they don't get their way. Most recently they surrounded two ministries and state television to force through a political isolation law that bars former members of Moammar Gaddafi's regime from government posts.

Asia
5:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Print Media Thrives In Myanmar Where Internet Is Limited

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 3:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Print media are struggling in the U.S. and Europe, but in many Asian countries, including China and India, newspapers are thriving. Another example is Myanmar, also known as Burma. There, only 1 percent of people have access to the Internet and private daily newspapers are rushing into print after decades of being banned. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on how Burmese journalists are exercising newfound freedoms.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

'Four Little Girls' Awarded Congressional Gold Medal

The Congressional Gold Medal has been posthumously awarded to four girls killed in the 1963 bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. President Obama signed the legislation Friday, as (from left) Birmingham Mayor William Bell, Dr. Sharon Malone Holder, Attorney General Eric Holder, Rep. Terri Sewell, and relatives of Denise McNair and Carole Robertson look on.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 5:59 pm

They were just little girls when they were killed in 1963, in what came to be known as the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing. And now Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley have been awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, nearly 50 years after the attack in Birmingham, Ala.

President Obama signed the legislation Friday to award the girls — all of them 14, except for McNair, who was 11 — with the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian.

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Shots - Health News
5:11 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

A Token Gift May Encourage Gift Of Life

A stamp can build awareness, but broader use of incentives could help boost blood donations.
Michael Rega iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:08 am

There are two things you can always count on: public radio pledge drives and the local blood bank asking for a donation of a very different sort.

Both kinds of giving can fill you with a sense of goodwill. But, let's be honest, the tote bags help, too.

When it comes to blood donations, though, ethical concerns and risk have led to limits on incentives for donors in many places. The World Health Organization has set a goal for governments around the world to reach completely voluntary and nonremunerated donations of blood by 2020.

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Movie Reviews
4:49 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

More Time Together, Though 'Midnight' Looms

Still Talking: After 18 years, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) apparently have plenty left to hash out.
Despina Spyrou Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 5:39 pm

Celine and Jesse are sporting a few physical wrinkles — and working through some unsettling relational ones — in Before Midnight, but that just makes this third installment of their once-dewy romance gratifyingly dissonant.

It's been 18 years since they talked through the night that first time, Julie Delpy's Celine enchanting and occasionally prickly, Ethan Hawke's Jesse determined to charm; their chatter then, as now, scripted but loose enough to feel improvised as captured in long, long takes by Richard Linklater's cameras.

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Author Interviews
4:41 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

A Race Against Time To Find WWI's Last 'Doughboys'

Arthur Fiala, shown here in 1918 and 2005, was a private in the 26th Company of the 20th Engineers Regiment during World War I.
Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 6:27 am

Ten years ago, writer Richard Rubin set out to talk to every living American veteran of World War I he could find. It wasn't easy, but he tracked down dozens of centenarian vets, ages 101 to 113, collected their stories and put them in a new book called The Last of the Doughboys. He tells NPR's Melissa Block about the veterans he talked to, and the stories they shared.

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This Is NPR
4:38 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Photojournalist ProFile: 'You Have To Be In The Middle Of It.'

NPR photographer David Gilkey in Afghanistan's Kunar River Valley as he navigated closed roads on his way back to Kabul (2010).
Courtesy of CNN's Ivan Watson

My name... David Gilkey
NPR employee since... 2007
Public radio listener since... I was a kid and my dad drove me to school.

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The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Ring Nebula Is More Like A Jelly Doughnut, NASA Says

The famous Ring Nebula is shown here in striking detail, in a composite image made from images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and infrared data from telescopes on Earth.
NASA, ESA, C.R. Robert O'Dell, G.J. Ferland, W.J. Henney and M. Peimbert

The Ring Nebula, whose iconic shape and large size make it a favorite of amateur astronomers, can now be seen in new detail, after NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a sharp image of the nebula. Researchers say the new clarity reveals details that were previously unseen, and a structure that's more complex than scientists had believed.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:08 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Who Defines Who We Are?

Istanbul
Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

In The Third Chimpanzee, Jared Diamond offers a clever — if speculative — theory of the origins of race. After first dismissing the idea that racial differences are functional adaptations to different climates, he proposes that the tendency for certain people to look alike in respect of facial features, skin color, body type, etc., is a consequence of the fact that people mostly choose to reproduce with people like themselves.

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NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Civilian Life Transition Harder For African-American Vets?

For some veterans, the war is not over when they come home. Host Michel Martin speaks with two former servicemen, Benjamin Fleury-Steiner and Leo Dunson, about some of the difficulties African-American veterans face after returning to civilian life.

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

The Science Of Being 'Top Dog'

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 12:13 pm

Some people believe competition is an art, others say it is a skill. A recent book suggests it's neither — and there's actually a science behind winning. Host Michel Martin speaks with authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman about their book, Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing (This interview originally aired on Feb. 25, 2013 on Tell Me More).

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

The Benefits Of Letting Bygones Be Bygones

Forgiving someone who's done you wrong can be challenging, but learning how to do it can benefit your mind and body. Frederic Luskin of the Stanford Forgiveness Project writes about this in his book, Forgive For Good. He joins host Michel Martin to talk about why learning to forgive is worth it (This interview originally aired on Feb. 22, 2013 on Tell Me More).

NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

You've probably heard that forgiveness reduces stress and can provide peace and closure. But Slate advice columnist Emily Yoffe says that's not always true. She tells host Michel Martin that sometimes it's better to cut ties, especially in the case of abusive parents. Psychiatrist Richard Friedman also joins the conversation (This interview originally aired on Mar. 11, 2013 on Tell Me More).

The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Ex-Guatemalan President Extradited To U.S.

Former Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo speaks with journalists in Guatemala City before boarding a plane for the U.S. on Friday.
AFP/Getty Images

Former Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo has been extradited to the United States, where he faces charges of laundering tens of millions of dollars through U.S. banks.

Portillo, who served as president from 2000 to 2004, was snatched from a hospital bed in Guatemala City, where he was recovering from liver surgery. He was placed on an airplane bound for New York, according to his lawyer, Mauricio Berreondo.

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Mountain Stage
3:04 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Overmountain Men On Mountain Stage

The Overmountain Men.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 4:03 pm

Overmountain Men makes its first appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va. Taking its name from the soldiers of the American Revolution who lived west of (or "over") the Appalachians, Overmountain Men began as a collaboration between North Carolina singer, songwriter and attorney David Childers and Avett Brothers bassist Bob Crawford. Crawford had written a song about a real-life prison rodeo for a documentary, and sought out Childers to sing it.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:41 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

The Cocktail Party Guide To Igor Stravinsky

Don't be caught "Stravinsky deficient" as the big centennial of his Rite of Spring approaches.
Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 4:21 pm

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Monkey See
2:37 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Are Women Really Missing From Film Criticism?

iStockphoto.com

A new study from the Center for the Study of Women in Television & Film has led to headlines claiming that women are missing from film criticism. "Female Movie Critics' Influence Shrinking, Says Study," reads the headline in the Chicago Tribune.

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World Cafe
2:37 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Fitz & The Tantrums On World Cafe

Fitz & The Tantrums.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 5:56 pm

The L.A. band Fitz & The Tantrums broke through in 2011 with its debut album, Picking Up the Pieces. Undeniable songs and exciting concerts led the group to festival dates and other high-profile live appearances around the world.

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Movie Reviews
2:34 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

This Time, It's A Dull Ache Of A 'Hangover'

Dazed And Confused (And Just Plain Lazy): Zach Galifianakis (center), with Ed Helms and Bradley Cooper, is back for a third Hangover film.
Warner Bros. Pictures

Well, they did say this one was going to be different.

After The Hangover II essentially duplicated the structure of the first movie --three guys piecing together a night of debauchery and mayhem none of them can entirely remember — director Todd Phillips promised that the third would go in a new direction. And, in a bold if unbelievable move in the era of never-ending sequels, he pledged that this Hangover would be the last.

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The Two-Way
2:33 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Google Reportedly Faces Antitrust Probe Over Display Ads

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 2:52 pm

The Federal Trade Commission is in the early stages of opening an antitrust probe into how Google runs its online display advertising business, according to a report by Bloomberg News, citing sources who want to remain anonymous because the FTC has not announced the probe.

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