World

Author Interviews
3:57 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

From A 'Death' To A Crisis, Tracing China's Bo Xilai Scandal

Chongqing Municipality Communist Party Secretary Bo Xilai attends the opening ceremony of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People on March 3, 2012, in Beijing, China.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:25 pm

On Feb. 7, 2012, Wang Lijun, a former Chinese police chief, showed up at the American Consulate in Chengdu, China. He said his life was in danger, asked for asylum and said he had information implicating Bo Xilai, an important member of the Chinese political elite, in the murder of a British citizen.

The incident set off an international media deluge, and the ensuing scandal sent ripples throughout the ruling Communist Party that are still being felt.

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Obama In Oklahoma: 'You Are Not Alone'

President Obama is greeted as he tours a tornado affected area on Sunday in Moore, Oklahoma.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama toured the devastation in Moore, Okla. Sunday afternoon, comforting some victims and pledging federal support. He said that he came to city as a representative of the American people.

"I'm just a messenger here," Obama said, "letting everybody know that you are not alone."

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Music Interviews
1:40 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Dirty Beaches: A Nomad Musician Starts Over (And Over, And Over)

Dirty Beaches is the performing title of the Taiwanese-Canadian musician Alex Zhang Hungtai. His new double album is called Drifters / Love Is the Devil
Daniel Boud Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 3:09 pm

Alex Zhang Hungtai is a musician who has spent his life drifting from home to home. His parents were children of communist China, and since setting out, he's lived in places as far-flung as Honolulu, Montreal and most recently, Berlin.

Under the name Dirty Beaches, Hungtai makes washy, dreamy rock music that often feels nostalgic. Hungtai's whole last album was dedicated to his father; he was inspired after finding out his dad had been in a doo wop cover band during his youth in China.

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The Two-Way
1:03 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Four Rockets Strike Hezbollah Strongholds In Lebanon

Lebanese men inspect destroyed cars after two rockets exploded in Shiah, a southern suburb of Beirut, on Sunday.
Anwar Amro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:39 am

Four rockets hit areas of Beirut, Lebanon that are controlled by Hezbollah on Sunday. The attacks came hours after the leader of the militant group, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, vowed to continue its fight to keep Syrian president Bashar Assad in power.

As the AP reports, Lebanon and Syria have a similar sectarian divide. The wire service reports:

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Justice Department Told News Corp. About Fox Subpoena In 2010

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:29 pm

Fox News officials professed indignation and surprise last week over the search of reporter James Rosen's records amid a federal leak investigation

But prosecutors told Fox's parent company of a subpoena nearly three years ago.

Prosecutors issued a subpoena for Rosen's phone records and got a judge to sign off on a sealed warrant for his emails back in May 2010.

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Books
10:35 am
Sun May 26, 2013

The Women Who Inspired Other Women With 'Mary Tyler Moore'

The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in 1970.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 11:26 am

In the '60s, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural — think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than four decades years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Japan's ANA Puts Its 787 Dreamliners Back In Service

All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 Dreamliner takes off from Chitose airport in Hokkaido, northern Japan, for Tokyo's Haneda airport on Sunday.
Jiji Press AFP/Getty Images

Japan's All Nippon Airways put its fleet of Boeing 787s back in service Sunday. If you remember, the Dreamliners were grounded for four months after two separate airplanes had issues with their batteries overheating.

The BBC reports that the first Dreamliner flight landed at Tokyo's Haneda airport after a short flight from Sapporo today. The BBC adds:

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This Is NPR
9:33 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'The Salt' Blog Host ProFile: 'I Got To Share Coffee With The Whole World'

Maggie Starbard NPR

My name is... Maria Godoy

NPR employee since... 2003

Public radio listener since... 1999. I started listening to KQED when I lived in the San Francisco Bay Area, and it was a revelation. I thought: NPR — that's the kind of journalism I want to practice.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Report Raises Questions About Rutgers' New Athletic Director

Julie Hermann talks to the media after being introduced as Rutgers University athletic director on May 15, 2013 in Piscataway, New Jersey.
Rich Schultz Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 11:58 am

Struggling to emerge from the shadow of Mike Rice — the men's basketball coach fired after video showed him assaulting his players — Rutgers hired Julie Hermann, a new athletic director the school hopes would make things better.

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Middle East
7:13 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Syrian Opposition Faces Expanding, Volatile Conflict

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:38 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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From Our Listeners
7:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Compromise' And 'The F'

iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 5:25 pm

NPR's Bob Mondello and Susan Stamberg read excerpts of two of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. They read The Art of Compromise by Lindsey Appleford of Boerne, Texas, and Claudia Who Found the F by Sean Enfield of Denton, Texas. You can read their full stories below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:30 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Investigating The Crime Scene

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 3:21 pm

On-air challenge: Today's theme is "C.S.I." — as in the name of the long-running TV show. You're given three words starting with the letters C, S and I. For each set, give a fourth word that can follow each of the original words to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

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NPR Story
5:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Obama Administration Turns Attention Toward Africa

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry was in the capital of Ethiopia this weekend. He was attending the 50th anniversary summit of the African Union, and he was laying the groundwork for President Obama's trip to Africa in the next month. Our East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner is in Addis Ababa. He joins us now. Hi, Greg. Thanks for being with us.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Thanks, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, you spent the day with the secretary. How was he received?

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NPR Story
5:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'Brilliant Minds' Behind 'Mary Tyler Moore'

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 9:08 am

In the sixties, many of the women on television were cute, a little silly, and married. A couple shows even featured women who were sweetly supernatural - think Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie. Mary Richards, though, was single, sassy, and filled with joy. She was practically magic to a new generation of women.

The beloved Mary Tyler Moore Show went on the air in 1970, and now, more than 35 years later, it's still a source of inspiration.

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NPR Story
5:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Dolphin Helps Navy Recover Rare Torpedo Under The Sea

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:13 am

A dolphin being trained by the Navy to find underwater mines recently made a surprising discovery: a 130-year-old brass torpedo, lying dormant at the bottom of the ocean. Host Rachel Martin talks with Chris Harris, chief of operations for the Navy's Marine Mammal Program, about the find.

Code Switch
5:48 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Job Searching While Black: What's Behind The Unemployment Gap?

A man interviews for a job in Detroit. The unemployment rate for black Americans in Michigan was 18.7 percent in 2012, more that twice the rate for whites in the state.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 6:04 pm

In the classic American story, opportunity is always in front of you. You finish school, find a job, buy a home and start a family; it's a rosy dreamscape.

But that world is one-dimensional. Income inequality is just about as American as baseball and apple pie. And though the economy has improved in the past few years, the unemployment rate for black Americans, now 13.2 percent, is about double that for white Americans.

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Books News & Features
5:39 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

A Lost And Found 'Wonder': Pearl S. Buck's Final Novel

Pearl Buck was born in West Virginia but spent much of her childhood in China, where her parents worked as missionaries.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 6:15 pm

Pearl S. Buck emerged into literary stardom in 1931 when she published a book called The Good Earth. That story of family life in a Chinese village won the novelist international acclaim, the Pulitzer and, eventually, a Nobel Prize. Her upbringing in China as the American daughter of missionaries served as inspiration for that novel and many others; by her death in 1973, Buck had written more than 100 books, including 43 novels.

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Author Interviews
5:39 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

A Literary Tale of Chechnya, The Horror and Whimsy

Russian soldiers take their position near the village of Shatoy, Chechnya.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 12:05 pm

In his debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, Anthony Marra transports readers to Chechnya, a war-torn Russian republic that has long sought independence.

The lyrical and heart-breaking novel begins in 2004 when a doctor watches as Russian soldiers abduct his neighbor, who has been accused of aiding Chechen rebels. He later rescues the neighbor's 8-year-old daughter, then colludes with another doctor to form an unlikely family amid the daily violence.

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Theater
5:20 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Two Songs That Led Keith Carradine From Screen To Broadway

Keith Carradine (right) performs with the cast of Hands on a Hardbody during its spring 2013 run in New York.
Chad Batka

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 6:22 pm

The Broadway musical Hands on a Hardbody wasn't your typical Broadway musical; it was about a group of Texans trying to win a new truck at a local dealership.

Actor Keith Carradine played JD Drew, one of the contestants. Though the show closed in April after just 56 performances, Carradine received rave reviews and a Tony nomination for best actor.

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The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Flooding Brings San Antonio To Standstill, Kills One

A San Antonio metro bus sits in floodwaters after it was swept off the road during heavy rains on Saturday.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:30 pm

A massive storm system has dumped more than 10 inches of rain over San Antonio, leaving the Texas city flooded and at a standstill.

Texas Public Radio's Ryan Loyd reports the area is still under a flash flood emergency. Ryan filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Some people didn't have time to make it to safety in rain-drenched San Antonio. A woman died when raging flood waters swept her away in her car. So much rain fell that it floated a city bus. Major highways are completely submerged.

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