World

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Who's Bill This Time

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis...

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

KURTIS: ...filling in for Carl Kasell. And here's your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill. Thanks, everybody. Fun show for you today. We got Deepak Chopra on. He'll be coming on later to adjust our chakras.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Not My Job: Deepak Chopra Plays 'Yes, We Cannes'

Diane Bondareff AP

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

We've had a lot of impressive people as our guests on this show ... Nobel Prize winners, senators, governors, and two presidents of the United States. But now, for the first time ever, we are honored to welcome a Lord of Immortality, a Keeper of Perfect Health for the World.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Prediction

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

Our panelists predict who will be the next big bromance.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Limericks

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

Bill reads three news-related limericks: Checking Your Work, Skyhound, Grilled Salmonella.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

More questions for the panel: Mount Effortless, Door-to-Shore Delivery.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:59 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 10:52 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Ken Jennings, Amy Dickinson, and Roy Blount, Jr. And here again is your host, at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

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Parallels
5:30 am
Sat June 1, 2013

After Years Of War, Ugandan Children Face New Deadly Threat

Grace Aber stands in the shade of a mango tree with her children in the remote village of Tumangu in northern Uganda. Four of Aber's nine children have been diagnosed with nodding syndrome, starting with Partick (front), who first showed symptoms in 2002.
Matthew Kielty for NPR

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 8:27 am

The village of Tumangu, in northern Uganda, defines remote. It's hard even to find on maps. But it shows up frequently in news stories. Grace Aber is about to show me why.

She leads me down a narrow dirt path, passing a couple of clay huts. We get to a big mango tree. Aber's 17-year-old son, Patrick, sits under it. His shoulders are slouched. His eyes look like glass.

Aber tries to get him to say his name. A small grunt is the only sound he makes.

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Simon Says
5:29 am
Sat June 1, 2013

High School Newspapers: An Endangered Species

Student newspapers may be the latest victims of social media.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 2:49 pm

Does your local high school have a student newspaper? And in this day when a social media message saying, "Tonight's Green Design and Technology class homework sucks!" can instantly be sent to thousands, does it need to?

The New York Times reports this week that only 1 in 8 of New York's public high schools has a student newspaper — and many of those are published just a few times a year. A few more are online, which can leave out poorer schools.

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The Picture Show
5:29 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Documenting America's Environments: Then And Now

East Boston, Mass., in 1973 (left) and in 2012.
Michael P. Manheim Environmental Protection Agency

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 2:26 pm

In 1971, when the Environmental Protection Agency was in its early days, someone at the agency got the idea to send nearly 100 freelance photographers around America to document the country. These weren't postcard shots, but pictures of street corners, freight yards, parking lots, alleyways — wherever people were working and living. It was called Documerica, and it went on for seven years.

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It's All Politics
5:23 am
Sat June 1, 2013

Obama's Economic View: A Glass Half-Full And Half-Empty

President Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on Friday. He said the economy is seeing progress but added that too many people are still struggling.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 6:39 am

It has been a good week for economic news. Here's a quick rundown of the positive signs: Home prices showed their best gains in seven years. Consumer confidence hit a five-year high. The stock market set a new record. All just this week.

"We're seeing progress," President Obama said in the White House Rose Garden on Friday morning, "and the economy is starting to pick up steam. The gears are starting to turn again, and we're getting some traction."

You could tell from the tone of his voice that he was leading up to a "but."

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The Salt
5:21 am
Sat June 1, 2013

France Sells Presidential Wines To Update Palace Wine Cellar

French President Francois Hollande's palace has decided to dive into its wine cellar and sell some of its treasures to raise money and replenish its collection with more modest vintages. About 1,200 bottles, a 10th of the Elysee's wine collection, are being sold at the Drouot auction house in Paris this week.
Jacques Brinon AP

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 3:46 pm

Prized Burgundies and Bordeaux once served at the presidential palace in France were sold for the first time ever as the wine cellar at Elysee Palace gets an overhaul.

Some 1,200 bottles, or 10 percent of the palace wines, went on sale this week at the famous Drouot auction house in downtown Paris. On the block were vintages from 1930 to 1990, including famous names such as Chateau Latour, Chateau Mouton Rothschild and Montrachet.

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Music Interviews
2:03 am
Sat June 1, 2013

City And Colour: A Musician Unplugs To Make A Connection

Dallas Green, once a member of the post-hardcore group Alexisonfire, now makes much quieter music as City and Colour. His fourth solo album is The Hurry and the Harm.
Dustin Rabin Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 1, 2013 3:21 pm

City and Colour is the stage name of Canadian singer-songwriter Dallas Green. Once upon a time, he was a member of the post-hardcore band Alexisonfire, which self-identified as "the sound of two Catholic high-school girls in mid-knife fight." But Green had a different side to him, too.

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This Is NPR
6:33 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

The NPR Podcast Guide: Pop Culture Happy Hour

Claire Mueller NPR

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 11:22 am

At This is NPR, we take seriously the charge to help you discover your next favorite thing from NPR. This summer, we're navigating the world of NPR Podcasts. With 111 podcasts produced by NPR, this will be a big task. But anything for you, dear reader, so let us be your guide.

This series will be an introduction to our podcast offerings: what you can expect, why you will enjoy and recent must-hear episodes. With any luck you'll find a few NPR additions to your playlist.

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The Two-Way
6:09 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Firefighters Killed In Houston Motel Blaze

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:53 pm

Four firefighters have been killed battling a five-alarm fire at a Houston motel. At least five others have been injured.

The Houston mayor's office confirmed the dead and injured after firefighters responded to the massive blaze at the Southwest Inn shortly after noon. The fire reportedly began at a restaurant and then "flames spread to the motel and were shooting from the roof before firefighters extinguished the blaze," The Associated Press reports.

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Shots - Health News
5:54 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

D.C. Agency Approves 2 High-Tech Cancer Centers

After months of heated debate, two of the biggest hospital systems in Washington, D.C., won approval Friday to build expensive proton beam centers for cancer treatment.

Together, the two high-tech expansions are expected to cost $153 million. The green light comes despite questions about whether the proton beam treatment is more effective than less expensive options.

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The Two-Way
5:34 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

U.S., Russia At Odds Over Moscow's Plan To Arm Syria

A MIG-29 and its armaments on display at the military aerodrome at Vasylkiv near Kiev, Ukraine.
Sergei Supinsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:48 pm

Russian media has hinted that Moscow could speed up delivery of S-300 surface-to-air missiles to Syria if the U.S. and its allies decide to impose a no-fly zone to aid rebels there. Meanwhile, a Russian airplane maker says Syria is discussing the purchase of additional MiG-29 fighters.

A Russian arms industry source quoted by Interfax news agency says Moscow could hasten delivery of the S-300 to Syria, even though the missiles would still take months to arrive.

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The Two-Way
5:31 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

'Atari Dump' Will Be Excavated, After Nearly 30 Years

The "Atari Dump" of New Mexico, where the game company rid itself of unsold game cartridges, will be excavated this summer. Here, a file photo shows a woman demonstrating Atari's unreleased 1984 Mindlink device, using a headband that picks up impulses from movement of the player's forehead.
Charlie Knoblock AP

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 6:59 pm

The New Mexico landfill or "Atari Dump" where the game console maker buried its mistakes — the biggest being the game E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial — will be dug up by game developer Fuel Industries, which hopes to make a documentary about the project.

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Planet Money
5:15 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

All The Wealth We Lost And Regained Since The Recession Started

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 7:47 pm

American households lost roughly $16 trillion in net worth since the recession started in 2007. According to the latest Fed data, we regained about $14.6 trillion, or roughly 91 percent, of it. But let's not break out the champagne glasses just yet.

A new report from the St. Louis Fed shows that, after adjusting those numbers for inflation and normalizing them for population growth, we recovered less than half of what we've lost in wealth.

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Remembering Heroes Of The Second World War
5:04 pm
Fri May 31, 2013

Army Nurse Mildred Manning: An 'Angel' POW With A Job To Do

Mildred Manning, then Mildred Dalton, was serving as a U.S. Army nurse in the Philippines when she was taken prisoner by Japanese forces in 1942.
U.S. Army

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 9:23 pm

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who died this year.

There were no "typical" tours of duty in World War II, but U.S. Army nurse Mildred Dalton Manning's was particularly extraordinary. Manning, along with six dozen other nurses, was held captive by the Japanese for almost three years. The group became known as the "Angels of Bataan and Corregidor."

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