World

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
1:33 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Panel Round One

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:21 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everyone that most weeks they can join us at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago. For tickets and more information on all our shows, go to wbez.org or you can find a link at our website waitwait.npr.org.

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Adam, there's almost nowhere left in the world free from advertising, but at least we have the refreshing clean taste of Pepsi Cola to comfort us.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
1:33 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:21 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News Quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis filling in for Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Adam Felber, Mo Rocca, and Faith Salie. And here again is your host, at the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill.

(APPLAUSE)

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

SAGAL: Right now, it is time for the WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-Wait-Wait to play our game on the air. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
1:33 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Panel Round Two

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:21 am

Transcript

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR news quiz. I'm legendary anchorman Bill Kurtis, filling in for Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Mo Rocca, Faith Salie, and Adam Felber. And here again is your host from the Orpheum Theater in downtown Minneapolis.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Bill. In just a minute Bill pays tribute to his favorite Minnesota Twin, Joe Rhyme-auer.

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
1:32 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:21 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now it's time to move on to our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our players will have 60 second in which to answer as many fill in the blank questions as he or she can. Each correct answer's now worth two points. Bill, can you give us the scores?

BILL KURTIS: Adam has four, Faith has two, Mo has two.

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The Two-Way
7:36 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Court Rules That Arizona Sheriff Engages In Racial Profiling

Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio (right) attends a rally for the Tea Party Express in 2010.
Joshua Lott Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 8:29 pm

A U.S. district court has ruled that Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio's department has violated the rights of Latino drivers by racially profiling them as part of a crackdown on illegal immigration and issued an injunction to halt the practice.

The decision on Friday marks the first time that the hard-line Maricopa County sheriff's office has been found to be engaging in systematic racial profiling.

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The Two-Way
6:57 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Toronto Mayor: 'I Do Not Use Crack Cocaine'

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford at a city council meeting on Tuesday.
Nathan Denette Associated Press

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:25 pm

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford says he doesn't smoke crack cocaine and isn't an addict, in response to a video that surfaced recently purporting to show him using the illegal drug.

Last week Ford called the cellphone video obtained by The Toronto Star "ridiculous" and blamed the newspaper for "going after me."

Friday's comments from Ford were more emphatic.

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It's All Politics
6:54 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Obama's Terrorism Fight Is Colored Gray, Not Black And White

Protests like this one in 2010 in Pakistan in part led President Obama to recalibrate when U.S. officials will order drone strikes, as part of a nuanced policy.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 7:15 pm

It's difficult for an American president to govern through nuance, especially when it's necessary to persuade a majority of the people that certain actions are essential for national security. And effective persuasion usually requires clarity.

That's how you arrive at President George W. Bush's stark formulation "You're either with us, or you're with the terrorists" after Sept. 11, and much of what sprang from it.

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Planet Money
5:52 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Episode 217: The Art Of Living At The Poverty Line

Spencer Platt Getty Images

On today's Planet Money, we meet a single mother who makes $16,000 a year — and who managed to fund a vacation at a Caribbean resort with an interest-free loan from one of the world's largest banks.

Edith Calzado gets credit cards with teaser zero-percent interest rates — then transfers her balance before the rate ticks up. She signs up for store cards to get discounts — then pays off her bill on time. She gets food stamps and lives in subsidized housing. Her son is doing well in school.

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The Two-Way
5:51 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Hedge Fund Manager Apologizes For Comments On Female Traders

Paul Tudor Jones (left) at an National Audubon Society function in January.
Diane Bondareff Invision for the National Audubon Society

Billionaire Paul Tudor Jones is back-peddling from remarks he made at a symposium last month that motherhood causes women to lose the necessary focus to be successful traders.

"As soon as that baby's lips touched that girl's bosom, forget it," Jones told an audience at the University of Virginia on April 26.

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World
5:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Toronto Mayor Dodges Accusations Of Crack Cocaine Use

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 6:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This remarkable statement today from the mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford.

(SOUNDBITE OF PREPARED STATEMENT)

MAYOR ROB FORD: I do not use crack cocaine, nor am I an addict of crack cocaine.

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Africa
5:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Elected Leadership Struggles To Rule In Libya

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 6:03 pm

In Libya, guns are still everywhere and the elected leadership is struggling to rule as militias use guns and intimidation when they don't get their way. Most recently they surrounded two ministries and state television to force through a political isolation law that bars former members of Moammar Gaddafi's regime from government posts.

Asia
5:26 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Print Media Thrives In Myanmar Where Internet Is Limited

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 3:19 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Print media are struggling in the U.S. and Europe, but in many Asian countries, including China and India, newspapers are thriving. Another example is Myanmar, also known as Burma. There, only 1 percent of people have access to the Internet and private daily newspapers are rushing into print after decades of being banned. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports on how Burmese journalists are exercising newfound freedoms.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

'Four Little Girls' Awarded Congressional Gold Medal

The Congressional Gold Medal has been posthumously awarded to four girls killed in the 1963 bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. President Obama signed the legislation Friday, as (from left) Birmingham Mayor William Bell, Dr. Sharon Malone Holder, Attorney General Eric Holder, Rep. Terri Sewell, and relatives of Denise McNair and Carole Robertson look on.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 5:59 pm

They were just little girls when they were killed in 1963, in what came to be known as the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing. And now Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley have been awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, nearly 50 years after the attack in Birmingham, Ala.

President Obama signed the legislation Friday to award the girls — all of them 14, except for McNair, who was 11 — with the highest honor Congress can bestow upon a civilian.

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Shots - Health News
5:11 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

A Token Gift May Encourage Gift Of Life

A stamp can build awareness, but broader use of incentives could help boost blood donations.
Michael Rega iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 8:08 am

There are two things you can always count on: public radio pledge drives and the local blood bank asking for a donation of a very different sort.

Both kinds of giving can fill you with a sense of goodwill. But, let's be honest, the tote bags help, too.

When it comes to blood donations, though, ethical concerns and risk have led to limits on incentives for donors in many places. The World Health Organization has set a goal for governments around the world to reach completely voluntary and nonremunerated donations of blood by 2020.

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Movie Reviews
4:49 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

More Time Together, Though 'Midnight' Looms

Still Talking: After 18 years, Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Celine (Julie Delpy) apparently have plenty left to hash out.
Despina Spyrou Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 5:39 pm

Celine and Jesse are sporting a few physical wrinkles — and working through some unsettling relational ones — in Before Midnight, but that just makes this third installment of their once-dewy romance gratifyingly dissonant.

It's been 18 years since they talked through the night that first time, Julie Delpy's Celine enchanting and occasionally prickly, Ethan Hawke's Jesse determined to charm; their chatter then, as now, scripted but loose enough to feel improvised as captured in long, long takes by Richard Linklater's cameras.

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Author Interviews
4:41 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

A Race Against Time To Find WWI's Last 'Doughboys'

Arthur Fiala, shown here in 1918 and 2005, was a private in the 26th Company of the 20th Engineers Regiment during World War I.
Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 6:27 am

Ten years ago, writer Richard Rubin set out to talk to every living American veteran of World War I he could find. It wasn't easy, but he tracked down dozens of centenarian vets, ages 101 to 113, collected their stories and put them in a new book called The Last of the Doughboys. He tells NPR's Melissa Block about the veterans he talked to, and the stories they shared.

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This Is NPR
4:38 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Photojournalist ProFile: 'You Have To Be In The Middle Of It.'

NPR photographer David Gilkey in Afghanistan's Kunar River Valley as he navigated closed roads on his way back to Kabul (2010).
Courtesy of CNN's Ivan Watson

My name... David Gilkey
NPR employee since... 2007
Public radio listener since... I was a kid and my dad drove me to school.

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The Two-Way
4:08 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Ring Nebula Is More Like A Jelly Doughnut, NASA Says

The famous Ring Nebula is shown here in striking detail, in a composite image made from images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and infrared data from telescopes on Earth.
NASA, ESA, C.R. Robert O'Dell, G.J. Ferland, W.J. Henney and M. Peimbert

The Ring Nebula, whose iconic shape and large size make it a favorite of amateur astronomers, can now be seen in new detail, after NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a sharp image of the nebula. Researchers say the new clarity reveals details that were previously unseen, and a structure that's more complex than scientists had believed.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
4:08 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Who Defines Who We Are?

Istanbul
Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

In The Third Chimpanzee, Jared Diamond offers a clever — if speculative — theory of the origins of race. After first dismissing the idea that racial differences are functional adaptations to different climates, he proposes that the tendency for certain people to look alike in respect of facial features, skin color, body type, etc., is a consequence of the fact that people mostly choose to reproduce with people like themselves.

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NPR Story
3:47 pm
Fri May 24, 2013

Civilian Life Transition Harder For African-American Vets?

For some veterans, the war is not over when they come home. Host Michel Martin speaks with two former servicemen, Benjamin Fleury-Steiner and Leo Dunson, about some of the difficulties African-American veterans face after returning to civilian life.

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