World

Middle East
5:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Netanyahu Cancels Palestinian-Only Bus Plan Just Before Scheduled Start

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Education
5:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Energy Companies Step In To Fund STEM Education

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 8:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Theater
5:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

'My Fair Lady' Couldn't Actually Dance All Night, So These Songs Had To Go

Julie Andrews starred as flower girl Eliza Doolittle in the Broadway premiere of My Fair Lady.
AP

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

When a Broadway musical feels as effortlessly right as Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe's did to audiences in 1956, it's easy to imagine that it simply sprang to life that way. Not My Fair Lady. The musical, based on George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion, is filled to bursting with some of the best-known songs in Broadway history — "The Rain In Spain," "Wouldn't It Be Loverly," "On the Street Where You Live" — but it turns out the show originally had other tunes that almost nobody knows.

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Iraq
4:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Fall Of Ramadi Highlights 'Fundamental Failure' Of U.S. Strategy In Iraq

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Movies
4:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

An Indian Master Returns To Cinemas, Restored

Subir Banerjee plays the young Apu in Pather Panchali, which made its New York debut 60 years ago this month.
Courtesy of Janus Films

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 8:19 am

In the crowded field of postwar cinema, Satyajit Ray broke through barriers of language and culture to become the most celebrated Indian filmmaker in the West.

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Planet Money
4:56 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

How A Machine Learned To Spot Depression

Institute for Creative Technologies

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 7:53 am

I'm in a booth with a computer program called Ellie. She's on a screen in front of me.

Ellie was designed to diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, and when I get into the booth she starts asking me questions — about my family, my feelings, my biggest regrets.

Emotions seem really messy and hard for a machine to understand. But Skip Rizzo, a psychologist who helped design Ellie, thought otherwise.

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All Songs TV
4:52 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Girlpool, 'Before The World Was Big'

Philadelphia-via-L.A. duo Girlpool take a day at the beach in their new video, "Before The World Was Big."
Courtesy of the artist

Girlpool have fun, but they don't mess around. The lo-fi punk duo spend the duration of their new video, for the title track from their debut LP, Before The World Was Big, cartwheeling and frolicking on a sun-drenched beach. Cares are few, trust falls are many, and a boardwalk Ferris wheel spins majestically over all.

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Parallels
4:50 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Desperate Rohingya Granted Temporary Shelter. But What Next?

A fishing boat carrying Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants is pulled to shore by Achenese fishermen off the coast of Julok, in Indonesia's Aceh province, on Wednesday.
Antara Foto/Syifa Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 7:17 pm

The governments of Indonesia and Malaysia agreed Wednesday to allow boats full of thousands of migrants stranded at sea to come ashore.

The news came as Indonesian fishermen rescued more than 400 people from a boat that first made the news last week — and finally got governments to act.

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The Two-Way
3:48 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Letterman Fills Final Show With Memories And Gratitude

David Letterman appears during the Wednesday taping of his final Late Show With David Letterman at the Ed Sullivan Theater in New York.
Jeffrey R. Staab AP

Originally published on Thu May 21, 2015 9:04 am

Update, 1:10 a.m. ET:

David Letterman approached his final, hour-plus of late-night TV on Wednesday with the same self-deprecation he displayed in the previous 6,027 episodes, but leavened the snark with heaps of nostalgia and praise.

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World Cafe
3:34 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Dr. Dog On World Cafe

Dr Dog.
Cameron Pollack WXPN

World Cafe's Sense Of Place: Philadelphia series had to include Dr. Dog. The band formed in 2001 in West Philadelphia, built around the writing skills of Toby Leaman and Scott McMicken.

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Mountain Stage
3:24 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

The Barr Brothers On Mountain Stage

The Barr Brothers.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Indie-folk band The Barr Brothers appears on Mountain Stage, recorded live on the campus of West Virginia University. After cutting their teeth touring the U.S. as members of The Slip, brothers Andrew and Brad Barr relocated to Montreal and joined forces with classically trained experimental harpist Sarah Page.

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Goats and Soda
3:16 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

I'd Like To Buy The Emerging World A Coke

A woman walks past an ad for Coca-Cola in Bamako, the capital of the Republic of Mali.
New York Daily News Archive NY Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 4:13 pm

So who does drink the most soda in the world, anyway?

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It's All Politics
2:52 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

How The Minimum-Wage Debate Moved From Capitol Hill To City Halls

Fast-food workers, health care workers and their supporters shout slogans at a Dec. 4, 2014, rally and march to demand a minimum-wage increase to $15 per hour in Los Angeles.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 4:50 pm

Once upon a time, minimum-wage debates were mostly the province of Congress and statehouses. These days, you're more likely than ever to hear these debates in your city hall. The trend continued this week, when the Los Angeles City Council voted to raise the city's minimum wage to $15 per hour.

The second-largest city in America could soon join Seattle and San Francisco in the club of cities that have agreed to gradually raise their wages above $15 per hour. And these cities are part of a larger, recent wave of cities and counties setting their own minimum wages.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

'Finding The Good' Through Obituary Writing

About 2,000 people live in Haines, Alaska, where Heather Lende has been writing obituaries for 20 years for the Chilkat Valley News. (Andrei Taranchenko/Flickr)

Journalist Heather Lende lives in the small town of Haines, Alaska, where the population is about 2,000. She’s written obituaries for almost 20 years at the Chilkat Valley News.

In doing so, she’s learned to “find the good,” as she says, not only in the lives of people she writes about, but also in her own life. Lende told Here & Now’s Robin Young that a portrait of the town she lives in also comes through her work.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Five Banks To Pay Billions Over Currency Manipulation

This combination made from file photos shows signage for four banks, Barclays, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, and the Royal Bank of Scotland, that will pay $2.5 billion in fines and plead guilty to criminally manipulating global currency market going back to 2007. The banks conspired with one another to fix rates on U.S. dollars and euros traded in the huge global market for currencies, according to a settlement announced Wednesday, May 20, 2015, between the banks and U.S. Justice Department. (Lefteris Pitarakis, Nick Ut, Kathy Willens, Matt Dunham/AP)

JPMorgan Chase, Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland Group, Citigroup and UBS have agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay more than $5 billion in total penalties relating to a U.S. investigation into whether the banks manipulated foreign currency rates.

The fines are on top of more than $4 billion in penalties that many of the same banks paid in November over similar charges. Matt Klein of the Financial Times joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Becoming A Cop, As Police Protests Dominate Headlines

The squad of six, including Stephanie Schendel, pose after being pepper-sprayed. Instructor Russ Hicks said the recruits bond after that unpleasant experience. (Isolde Raftery/KUOW)

What motivates someone to become a police officer these days? And what is it like to be a recruit as images of police protests dominate the news? Amy Radil of Here & Now contributor station KUOW met some of Washington state’s newest recruits.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Is Oklahoma's Death Penalty Cruel And Unusual? Supreme Court To Decide

This July 25, 2014 file photo shows bottles of the sedative midazolam at a hospital pharmacy in Oklahoma City. (AP)

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 2:20 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court is examining whether the death penalty method in Oklahoma constitutes cruel and unusual punishment for using a virtually untested drug called midazolam.

The plaintiffs, several prisoners on death row in the state, brought the case after the botched execution of Clayton Lockett, who took 43 minutes to die on the gurney in April of 2014.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Feds Say High-Profile Cancer Foundation Was A Fraud

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 2:20 pm

In 1987, James T. Reynolds started a new charity called the Cancer Fund of America. It told donors it was paying for pain medication for children and hospice care for terminally ill patients, and eventually branched into several other charities.

But in a filing yesterday, the Federal Trade Commission says that was all a sham. Less than 3 percent of the money raised actually went to patients, according to the filing, while almost $200 million was spent on luxury vacations, cars and tuition for the founder’s family and friends.

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NPR Story
1:57 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

The Sticking Point Of The Patriot Act: Section 215

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talks to reporters with Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) and Sen. John Thune (R-SD) after the weekly Senate GOP policy luncheon at the U.S. Capitol May 19, 2015 in Washington, D.C. Although he does not support the House version of the Patriot Act reauthorization, McConnell said the Senate would go forward with a vote on the legislation that would eliminate the bulk data collection programs, which were exposed by Edward Snowden. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed May 20, 2015 2:33 pm

Three sections of the post-September 11th Patriot Act will expire on June 1. One of those sections, Section 215, was the one former NSA contractor Edward Snowden brought to light concerning the bulk collection of American’s telephone records, and the one that the Senate will vote on this week.

The House already passed an alternative act, the USA Freedom Act, which would restrict the controversial bulk collection of phone records, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wants to pass an extension for the Senate to debate this hot issue when members are back from break.

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Media
1:51 pm
Wed May 20, 2015

Terry Gross To Marc Maron: 'Life Is Harder Than Radio'

Terry Gross and Marc Maron took the stage at WNYC's RadioLoveFest on May 6. During their conversation, Gross says, Maron "occasionally looked a little nervous or frustrated when he thought I was unforthcoming — or worse yet, being dull --€” but mostly, he looked emotionally present, curious and attentive."
Rebecca Greenfield Brooklyn Academy of Music

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 4:25 pm

Earlier this month, almost 2,000 radio fanatics gathered at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) to listen in as Marc Maron, the neurotic and sometimes gruff comedian and podcast host, interviewed Fresh Air's Terry Gross. He is known for being vulnerable and bringing his personal life into his interviews; she tends to keep her personal life separate from her work. The conversation that resulted blurs those two styles and ends up revealing aspects of Gross' life that even the biggest Fresh Air fans may find surprising.

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