World

The Two-Way
8:50 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Japan's Emperor Expresses 'Deep Remorse' For War Past

Japan's Emperor Akihito delivers his remarks with Empress Michiko during a memorial service at Nippon Budokan martial arts hall in Tokyo, on Saturday. His expression of "deep remorse" for Japan's wartime past is seen as an unprecedented apology.
Shizuo Kambayashi AP

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 1:27 pm

Japan's Emperor Akihito has apologized for his country's actions during World War II, 70 years after its surrender, expressing for the first time "deep remorse" over the death and destruction caused by Japanese forces.

"On this day to commemorate the war dead and pray for peace, my thoughts are with the people who lost their precious lives in the last war and their bereaved families," Emperor Akihito said in a speech during the ceremony.

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All Songs Considered
8:03 am
Sat August 15, 2015

The Good Listener: Are Tall People Obligated To Stand In The Back At Concerts?

Just look at those tall dudes in the front, waving their arms. Crouch down!
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 16, 2015 12:43 am

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and alongside the mammoth box someone used to ship us a single bottle of beer is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives. This time around: thoughts on tall folks at concerts.

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Europe
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Fleeing War, Syrians And Afghans Stream Onto Tiny Greek Island

Syrian migrants arrive on an overcrowded dinghy to the coast of the southeastern Greek island of Kos from Turkey, on Saturday. A ferry boat has been sent by the Greek government to the resort of Kos to speed up the registration process of hundreds of Syrian refugees.
Louisa Gouliamaki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 16, 2015 7:45 am

The Greek island of Kos, near the coast of Turkey, is a popular tourist retreat, but it has also become the latest destination for huge numbers of refugees and migrants going to Europe.

Teachers Nizar and Nasser plotted their escape from the Syrian city of Damascus during coffee breaks at school. They both came from religious minorities threatened by the Islamic State. Worn down by the constant shelling they decided to try to seek asylum in Europe and quickly secure visas for their families, who hid with relatives.

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Author Interviews
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Character Finds A Path Out Of Her Personal Prison In 'Eileen'

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

May we begin by getting you to read the first paragraph of your first novel?

OTTESSA MOSHFEGH: Sure.

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Sports
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

The Week In Sports: Underdog Teams Are On Top In Baseball

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Television
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

New 'Sesame Street' Deal Is All About Economics

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Europe
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

German Bus Driver Pauses To Welcome African Immigrants

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Author Interviews
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Dealing With Freedom — And Disaster — In 'Fortune Smiles'

Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson
Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Adam Johnson won the 2013 Pultizer Prize for his bestselling novel, The Orphan Master's Son, set in the nightmare state of North Korea. This summer, he has come out with a collection of short stories, set in locales that range from California to East Germany to a techno-dreamlike South Korea.

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Television
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

HBO's 'Hero' Tells A Slow Story In Too Many Hours

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Military's Win Puts Myanmar's Transition To Democracy In Question

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Asia
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Chinese Currency Devaluation Could Mean Turmoil In U.S. Markets

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Latin America
7:43 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Senators Hail A New Beginning In Cuba

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Let's See What Developed In National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

Second Place: Three gravel workmen look through a window at their workplace in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Dust and sand are everywhere.
Faisal Azim/Courtesy of National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 12:51 pm

OK, so maybe it was the photo of the painted goat that first caught our eye. (After all, we are Goats and Soda).

But there are many other gems from the National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.

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The Salt
7:03 am
Sat August 15, 2015

Canada's Historical Fare Reimagined For The Modern Diner

This dish — mussels smoked in pine needles and pine ash butter — was inspired by a 1605 recipe that the explorer Samuel de Champlain made for his men while traveling through Canada. It's one of many historically inspired items on the menu at the Toronto restaurant Boralia.
Courtesy of Nick Merzetti

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 11:59 pm

A server at Boralia lifts the foggy glass dome over a dish of briny mussels, releasing the smoky essence of pine and campfire. According to Evelyn Wu, co-owner of this Toronto restaurant, the dish dates back to 1605, and is based on a recipe that French-born explorer Samuel de Champlain made for his men while traveling in Canada.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sat August 15, 2015

The Blazing World Of Clarice Lispector, In 'Complete Stories'

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 11:06 am

In 1948, Clarice Lispector wrote a moving letter to her sister Tania, offering some pointed advice: "Have the courage to transform yourself," she wrote, "to do what you desire." It's a fairly simple exhortation, and yet I wonder how many people can't manage it, how many squander their entire lives, their deep wants and ambitions on the altar of fear and uncertainty. Lispector herself was determined not to be one of them.

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Music Interviews
5:31 am
Sat August 15, 2015

20 Years A Musician, Mike Flanigin Reflects On Firsts

Mike Flangin's debut album, The Drifter, comes out Aug. 21.
Ashley McCue Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Mike Flanigin has been a working musician for two decades. His first gig was at a Holiday Inn in Dallas, Texas, followed by a stint in the house band at Antone's in Austin. And for eight years he made his Hammond B3 organ growl and purr for the crowds at the Continental Club Gallery.

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Movie Interviews
5:30 am
Sat August 15, 2015

'60s Spies Hit The Big Screen, With Guy Ritchie Flair

Henry Cavill (left) and Armie Hammer star as CIA agent Napoleon Solo and KGB agent Illya Kuryakin in Guy Ritchie's reboot of The Man From U.N.C.L.E.
Daniel Smith Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 11:19 am

Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin have enjoyed lengthy careers — especially for men in a business as dangerous as spying.

The American and Soviet CIA agents had a wildly popular run on TV in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. in the '60s. But long after the show came off the air, Solo and Kuryakin bantered on — in a handful of movies, dozens of books, a few comics, countless reruns and the popular imagination.

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Parallels
5:20 am
Sat August 15, 2015

A Paris 'Beach Party' Turns Into A Middle East Protest

People in Paris dance at the "Tel Aviv beach event" on the banks of the Seine River on Thursday. Every summer, Paris celebrates a different seaside city. But the choice of Tel Aviv this year sparked protests from pro-Palestinian activists, who head a rival "Gaza beach event."
Francois Mori AP

Originally published on Sat August 15, 2015 10:36 am

Paris turns a bank of the River Seine into an urban beach every August, providing a respite for Parisians who can't get away for a summer vacation.

This year the Israeli seaside city of Tel Aviv was the theme for what was supposed to be a day of music and food trucks set amid sand, umbrellas and palm trees. But the faux seashore turned into a Middle East political battleground on Thursday.

"Israel murderers, Paris accomplices!" the pro-Palestinian protesters shouted next to a children's playground by the river.

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The Two-Way
12:44 am
Sat August 15, 2015

China Evacuates Tianjin Blast Site As Sodium Cyanide Found

People carry their luggage as they are evacuated Saturday in the aftermath of a huge explosion that rocked the port city of Tianjin, China.
Wu Hong EPA /Landov

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 12:04 pm

Updated at 10:40 a.m. ET

Chinese police are clearing everyone within 2 miles of a fire in the port city of Tianjin over fears of chemical poisoning, days after a massive explosion that authorities now say has killed at least 104 people.

Police confirmed that highly toxic sodium cyanide was present near the site, raising fears that spread of the chemical could cause more casualties.

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Planet Money
10:14 pm
Fri August 14, 2015

Episode 645: How To Stop An Asteroid

Moon and Earth
NASA

Originally published on Mon August 17, 2015 4:51 pm

Some smart people say we should be doing more to protect the Earth from asteroids. The technical issues are relatively easy. The economics — figuring out who's going to pay — are much harder.

Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Spotify/ Tumblr.

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