World

Ask Me Another
10:37 am
Thu October 10, 2013

That's Not Fair!

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's welcome our next two contestants, Georgia Andrews and Monique Sulle. Hi.

MONIQUE SULLE: Hi.

GEORGIA ANDREWS: Hi.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: All right. Georgia, Monique, we're going to break it down. Let's get real for a second. I just want to know what about life is not fair. Georgia.

ANDREWS: Ooh. I don't know. I - there's expression: Fair only happens in Iowa in the summer.

JONATHAN COULTON: Ah. Nice.

EISENBERG: Oh. Wow.

ANDREWS: That's really my comment on fairness.

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Ask Me Another
10:37 am
Thu October 10, 2013

The Idiot Jukebox

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

You're listening to ASK ME ANOTHER from NPR and WYNC. I'm Ophira Eisenberg. Coming up, we'll meet some characters in search of their author. Plus, we'll put the writer Tom Ruprecht in the puzzle hot seat. But let's welcome our next two contestants, Ben Kopish and Dominic Clarke.

(APPLAUSE)

BEN KOPISH: Hi there.

EISENBERG: Hi. What I do know about both of you is that you're both television junkies.

KOPISH: That's correct. Yep.

EISENBERG: OK. So, Ben, what's the last series you binge watched?

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Ask Me Another
10:37 am
Thu October 10, 2013

International Doppelgangers

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

On stage right now we have Kim Roth and Ryan Hyde.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Kim, do you ever have people telling you that you look like a certain celebrity?

KIM ROTH: I've had Kate Winslet twice but I see it not at all. Not at all.

EISENBERG: Kate Winslet twice. I can kind of see that.

ROTH: No.

EISENBERG: Yes. Yes. Ryan, how about you? Been told anyone that you look like?

RYAN HYDE: Laurence Fishburne.

EISENBERG: Laurence Fishburne?

(LAUGHTER)

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Ask Me Another
10:37 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Here's To You, Mr. Robinson

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:33 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

And I believe it's time to welcome our first two contestants, Eric Brown and Ana Chawla.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Welcome to you both. Eric, you are into coffee science; is that correct?

ERIC BROWN: That is correct.

EISENBERG: Now, what is coffee science?

BROWN: I'm a barrista and I like the science that goes behind it - the temperatures of brewing, the ratios, everything like that. I love it.

EISENBERG: Burr grinder?

BROWN: Absolutely.

EISENBERG: Yeah? OK.

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Parallels
10:24 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Will A Pakistani Teenager Win The Nobel Peace Prize?

Malala Yousafzai, 16, speaks in New York last month. Yousafzai was shot a year ago by the Taliban for her outspoken advocacy in favor of girls' education in Pakistan. She is considered one of the favorites for the Nobel Peace Prize, which will be announced Friday.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:03 am

It hasn't been a great year for peace. War is raging in Syria, grinding conflicts drag on in Afghanistan and Iraq, and assorted insurgencies plague nations from Asia to Africa.

Yet the Nobel Peace Prize will be announced Friday, and one of the favorites would be a striking choice: Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban last year for her outspoken advocacy of girls' education in her native Pakistan.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Malala Yousafzai Awarded Sakharov Prize

Malala Yousafzai addresses students and faculty after receiving the 2013 Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian Award at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., last month.
Jessica Rinaldi AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:33 pm

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot last year by Taliban militants for her advocacy of girls' education, has been awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought by European lawmakers.

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Cricket's Sachin Tendulkar Announces Retirement

Sachin Tendulkar celebrates scoring his 100th century during the Asia Cup cricket match against Bangladesh in Dhaka on March 16, 2012. He said Thursday that he will retire from test cricket after his 200th test in November.
Aijaz Rahi AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 8:44 am

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The Two-Way
8:19 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Top Stories: Obama, GOP Meet; Alice Munro Wins Nobel In Lit

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:18 pm

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All Songs Considered
8:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Song Premiere: Christopher Denny, My Morning Jacket's 'Bermuda Highway'

Timothy S. Griffin Courtesy of the artist

Five years ago, a listener looking for a lonesome song anywhere near Arkansas might have heard a voice she still can't forget. Christopher Denny was 23 when he released Age Old Hunger, introducing the world to a high Southern warble that doesn't defy gravity so much as play with the tension that force creates – an androgynous, time-jumping instrument. Denny was learning to control his singing then, a process he says is more about instinct than craft. "I have to say...

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Books News & Features
7:39 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Canadian Alice Munro Wins Nobel's Literature Prize

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The Swedish Academy, which gives Nobel Prizes out this time of year, calls for master of the contemporary short story. Canadian writer Alice Munro is the winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature. The announcement was made earlier this morning in Stockholm. And joining us to talk about the selection is NPR's Lynn Neary. Lynn, good morning

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

Good morning. Good to be here.

GREENE: So we have an editor at MORNING EDITION from Canada, and he literally jumped out of his seat when he heard this news.

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Book News: Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize In Literature

The Nobel Prize committee called Canadian author Alice Munro, seen in 2009, a "master of the contemporary short story."
Peter Muhly AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 9:42 am

This post was updated at 9:30 a.m.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Code Switch
7:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Recent Findings Question State Support Of Black Colleges

Morgan State University in Baltimore is one of the state's four historically black institutions.
Marylandstater Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:49 am

This week, a federal judge found that historically black colleges in Maryland were harmed when better-funded traditionally white institutions offered up the same degree programs in the state.

Tricia Bishop of The Baltimore Sun summed up the judge's ruling this way:

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First Reads
7:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'Bridget Jones: Mad About The Boy'

The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:38 pm

Sequels: 2, Tragic life events: 1, Daniel Cleaver guest appearances: several (v.v. good)

Yes, Bridgeteers, your favorite British flibbertigibbet is back — but this time, there's bit of a suprise: She's grown up, at least a little. Now 51 and a widow (the shocking death of Mark Darcy was revealed recently in The Sunday Times magazine), Bridget is struggling to take care of her two young children and still make time for her hot young boyfriend.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Austen Unvarnished: Q&A With Jo Baker, Author Of 'Longbourn'

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 3:21 pm

The world of Jane Austen — gracious country houses, empire-waist dresses, card parties and suppers and genteel raillery and a touch of social anxiety — is familiar literary ground. And no house is more familar and comforting than Longbourn, home to Elizabeth and Jane Bennet. But what goes on behind the scenes? Who irons those dresses and prepares those suppers?

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Libyan PM Freed After Being Held For Hours By Gunmen

Libyan's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan speaks to the media during a news conference in Rabat, Morocco, on Tuesday, two days before he was abducted.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:44 am

Libya's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was abducted Thursday by gunmen reportedly affiliated with former rebels. Hours later, he was suddenly freed.

Government spokesman Mohammed Kaabar said Zeidan has been "set free" and was on his way to the office, according to the LANA news agency.

Update At 8:50 a.m. ET. Reuters, which originally reported that Zeidan had tweeted that he was fine after his release, has withdrawn the story, saying the Twitter account was fake.

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Parallels
6:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

After Boat Tragedy, Calls For A Unified European Policy

A survivor of the shipwreck of migrants off the Italian island of Lampedusa looks out over the water Tuesday. The tragedy has bought fresh questions over the thousands of asylum-seekers who arrive in Europe by boat each year.
Tullio M. Puglia Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:21 pm

Top officials are calling for a change to the European Union's immigration policies after a boat filled with African migrants caught fire and sank off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa on Oct. 4, killing hundreds.

As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports on Morning Edition, the accident shocked Europe.

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Middle East
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Aid Workers: Syrian Refugees Unable To Help Their Kids Cope

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 12:09 pm

For two and a half years, Syria has been at war with millions of civilians on the move. U.N. agencies tracking the exodus say about three quarters of the children forced to flee their homes are under the age of 11. A team of child psychologists in Amman, Jordan, make house calls to address the needs of families who do not live in refugee camps.

Middle East
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

U.S. Delays Egyptian Aid Over Democracy Issue

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When Egypt's democratically-elected president was ousted from power, there was a lot of speculation that the United States might cut off some, if not all, aid to that country. And now the Obama administration has told the interim government in Egypt that it's holding up hundreds of millions of dollars. The message from the United States boils down to this: No Apache helicopters until you can show you're getting back on a path to democracy. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Africa
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Kidnapped Libyan Prime Minister Freed By Captors

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:39 am

The Libya State News Agency has announced Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has been freed. Earlier it was reported that gunmen kidnapped him from a hotel in Tripoli where he resides. The abduction came amid anger among Libya's powerful Islamic militant groups over the U.S. special forces raid that seized a Libyan al-Qaida suspect.

Europe
4:44 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Tragedy Prompts Calls For Change To EU Immigration Policies

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 8:32 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Countries in Europe have been struggling for some time to find a fair balance when it comes to immigration, and those efforts took on more urgency last week. A ship packed with African migrants sank off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa. Hundreds of people drowned, including children and pregnant women. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley begins her report with a reminder that this incident at sea was sadly, not anything new.

(SOUNDBITE OF VIDEO)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Help, help. Don't move.

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