World

Shots - Health News
3:41 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century

When anthropologists tallied the use of emotional words through a century of literature, they included many books without clear emotional content — technical manuals, for example, and automotive repair guides.
Steve Debenport iStockphotography

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 10:18 am

Were people happier in the 1950s than they are today? Or were they more frustrated, repressed and sad?

To find out, you'd have to compare the emotions of one generation to another. British anthropologists think they may have found the answer — embedded in literature.

Several years ago, more or less on a lark, a group of researchers from England used a computer program to analyze the emotional content of books from every year of the 20th century — close to a billion words in millions of books.

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The Salt
2:43 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Chili Bomb

Chili Bombs with a side of Totally Unnecessary Cheese Sauce.
NPR

The problem with chili has always been this: When you try to eat it with your hands, you get terrible burns and weird looks from the snooty side of your family at the 2007 Chillag Family Reunion. Speaking of which — why don't you guys just go back to your solid gold houses and your Harvard "utensils" and leave me alone? I am who I am.

Anyway, the great Wiener and Still Champion in Evanston, Ill., has solved this problem with the Chili Bomb. It's chili, mixed with melted cheese, wrapped in cornbread and fried.

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Opinion
2:18 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Op-Ed: The Iraq War's Lessons For Syria

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 8:23 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

And now Syria and Iraq on the Opinion Page this week. As we reconsider the 10 years since the invasion of Iraq, Washington Post editor Jackson Diehl says we should learn from that costly experience as we consider the civil war in Syria. About absent U.S. intervention, he argues, Syria could produce a much worse humanitarian disaster than Iraq. The tragedy of the post-Iraq logic embraced by President Obama, writes Diehl, is that it has ruled out not just George W. Bush-style invasions, but also more modest interventions.

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The Two-Way
2:13 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Once Again, Polls Show Attitudes Toward Guns Returning To Pre-shooting Levels

Guns on display at a show in Chantilly, Va., in July 2012.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /Landov

The day after last December's mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School we wrote that:

"The tragedy in Newtown, Conn., will surely spur pollsters to ask Americans again about guns, gun ownership, gun laws and the Second Amendment.

"If recent experience is a good guide, public opinion may not shift too much."

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Electric Car Maker Tesla Will See First Quarterly Profit

A Tesla Model S drives outside the Tesla factory in Fremont, Calif., on June 22. The electric car was named Automobile of the Year by Automobile Magazine and Car of the Year by Motor Trend.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 2:57 pm

Tesla Motors, the car company on a mission to change the auto industry, announced late Sunday that it's finally turning a profit this quarter.

The company said it will deliver 4,750 of its flagship Model S, its much-lauded four-door, luxury sports sedan. That amount exceeds its earlier estimates of 4,500 cars sold this quarter.

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SXSW: Live From Austin
2:04 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Bajofondo, Live In Concert: SXSW 2013

NPR

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 9:18 am

With eight accomplished musicians from Argentina and Uruguay, and a sound rooted in tango traditions, Bajofondo lays out a visual and aural feast. Led by Oscar and Grammy winner Gustavo Santaolalla, the group mashes up traditional candombe sounds and other forms with electronica to produce a mix that's hypnotic and danceable.

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All Songs Considered
1:57 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

How To Never Miss Another Concert

Don't miss Merchandise in your town ever again.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:11 pm

I love live music. But figuring out who's coming to town and when and where isn't so easy. I could go to every club's website to compile a list of upcoming shows, but that'd be cumbersome. Newspaper listing are often incomplete, don't look ahead and certainly don't filter or highlight who's in town based on my musical tastes.

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Shots - Health News
1:44 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

What's In A Name? More Drugs For Babies If It's GERD

Frequent spitting up affects about half of babies under six months, but it's usually not gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:00 pm

Say your one-month-old baby is spitting up and crying a lot. Your usual bag of infant-soothing tricks hasn't worked, and you're worried that there's something wrong with her.

So you head to the pediatrician, who tells you that your otherwise healthy child has gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD. Would receiving this medical diagnosis make you more interested in giving her drugs than if you never heard the word "disease"?

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

U.S. Adds F-22 Fighter Jets To Military Exercise In South Korea

The United States has sent two F-22 Raptor fighter jets to take part military drills in South Korea, a move that is meant to show U.S. commitment to the defense of the region from its North Korean neighbor, a Pentagon spokesman told the Associated Press.

Also on Monday, South Korean President Park Geun-hye appeared to give her country's military permission to strike back at any attack from the North.

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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Caroline Kennedy To Be Ambassador To Japan? Talk Grows

Caroline Kennedy in May 2012.
Brian Snyder Reuters /Landov

There's been chatter in Washington for the past month or so about Caroline Kennedy being tapped to be the next ambassador to Japan.

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The Picture Show
12:20 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Finding Beauty In A Baseball, After The Last Pitch

From Don Hamerman's series Baseballs.
Courtesy of Don Hamerman

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 10:17 am

As a new season of Major League Baseball begins, one photographer focuses on baseballs past — that is, baseballs that have lain dormant well after their last pitch.

For years, photographer Don Hamerman walked his dog near an old baseball diamond in Stamford, Conn. And in all different seasons, in all kinds of weather, Hamerman picked up old baseballs.

He brought them back to his studio, where they sat around for years until he finally decided to start photographing them in 2005.

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The Two-Way
11:47 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Patent Ruling In India Could Boost Exports Of Cheap Medicine To Third World

A Novartis office in Mumbai, India.
Divyakant Solanki EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 5:17 pm

A decision by India's Supreme Court to reject Novartis AG's bid to patent a version of one cancer drug could lead to more exports of cheap medicine from that country to "poor people across the developing world," the BBC writes.

NPR's Julie McCarthy tells our Newscast Desk that the ruling, announced Monday, ends a six-year legal battle that has been closely watched by pharmaceutical firms, humanitarian aid organizations and generic drug manufacturers.

She adds that:

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Deceptive Cadence
8:47 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Marching To 'Easter Monday On The White House Lawn'

President Barack Obama helps a young participant roll an egg during the White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House on April 9, 2012 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

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The Two-Way
7:33 am
Mon April 1, 2013

It's Almost Cicada Time! Help Radiolab Track #Swarmageddon

A newly emerged adult cicada dries its wings on a tree in Washington, D.C.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 1:39 pm

If history proves correct, Magicicada Brood II will emerge this spring after living underground for 17 years.

In many places along the Eastern Seaboard — from North Carolina to Connecticut — the cicadas will fill the skies, breed and then quickly die. National Geographic points out that historically, this group, known as Brood II, has been so prolific that picking up their carcasses can sometimes feel like raking leaves in the fall.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Book News: Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder, Researchers Say

William Shakespeare, brilliant playwright and cutthroat businessman?
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 7:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:06 am
Mon April 1, 2013

If Something Smells Funny, Remember What Day It Is

Spaghetti is "harvested" in 1961 from the ceiling of an Italian restaurant in London. A 1957 April Fools Day report by the BBC about spaghetti trees fooled many, and has been famous since.
Keystone/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 5:59 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': 'Hootie and the Time Travelers'

Google Nose was unveiled Monday morning. It's "the new scentsation in search." Just put your nose to the screen to sample "15M+ sentibytes." Google's also offering new options to its "I'm Feeling Lucky" button, including "I'm Feeling Wonderful" and "I'm Feeling Hungry."

Twitter is out with "Twttr," a version that only lets you use consonants.

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Europe
6:45 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Researchers Look Into Shakespeare's Finances

Originally published on Mon April 1, 2013 6:48 am

They report the great playwright did not entirely make his living in the theater. He was also a merchant, a moneylender and a tax dodger. In 1598, he was prosecuted for hoarding grain during a famine.

Europe
6:41 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Moscow Man Can't Wait For Summer Weather

The man was picketing Moscow's Hydrometeorological Center wearing swim trunks and holding a sign that read: "Let Summer Come Faster." Russian forecasters now predict that "everything will thaw fast" — adding, "we are meeting him halfway."

Political Junkie
6:08 am
Mon April 1, 2013

It's ScuttleButton Time!

Ken Rudin collection

I'm on vacation this week, and thus no Political Junkie column, Talk of the Nation appearance or podcast for me. But giving up ScuttleButton? No way.

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Business
4:42 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Novartis Loses Patent Battle In India

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a patent ruling that may affect millions.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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