World

Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
12:03 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 4, 2013

When Women Were Birds, Terry Tempest Williams' meditation on her mom's journals, appears at No. 10.

NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Bees Emerging After A Hard Winter

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

After a winter that many beekeepers have described as particularly hard on their hives, Eric Mussen, extension apiculturist at the University of California, discusses the plight of the modern honeybee and the threats the tiny pollinators face from disease and pesticides.

NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

'Drunk Tank Pink' Finds Clues To Behavior

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

If you're looking for a date on Match.com, does it matter what color your shirt is in your profile picture? Or if you're trying to make a partner, you want to make partner at a law firm, yeah, does having a hard-to-pronounce last name hurt your chances? Does staring at a pile of money, even phony Monopoly money, make you more selfish?

Read more
NPR Story
11:46 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Amyloid Proteins Help Paralyzed Mice Walk Again

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 4:54 pm

Reporting in Science Translational Medicine, researchers write that amyloid-forming proteins, traditionally thought of as enemies to the nervous system, may actually be protective 'guardians' instead. Study author Lawrence Steinman, a neurologist at Stanford University, explains how amyloid injections helped paralyzed mice with a multiple-sclerosis-like disease walk again.

Economy
10:43 am
Fri April 5, 2013

U.S. Job Growth Slows As Jobless Face Benefit Cuts

Applicants complete forms at a job fair in Newark, N.J. Weak U.S. job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 4:55 pm

The 11.7 million Americans searching for work got discouraging news Friday morning when the Labor Department said employers created only 88,000 jobs in March. The weak job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking.

The smaller-than-expected increase in payrolls was a big disappointment, coming after a long stretch of much better results. Over the past year, employment growth has averaged 169,000 jobs a month.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
9:27 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Monty Python's John Cleese Almost Explains Our Brains

YouTube

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:50 am

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Our Greatest Author

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's bring up our next two brave contestants. Please welcome Meera Siddharth and Helen Stoilas (ph).

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Meera, here's a question for you. Who do you think is the greatest author of all time?

MEERA SIDDHARTH: Oh, you're putting me on the spot. Shakespeare.

EISENBERG: Good. That's a great answer for being put on the spot. I'm liking that. Helen, what do you think?

HELEN STOILAS: J. K. Rowling.

(LAUGHTER)

(APPLAUSE)

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Johnson and Johnson

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Finally, it's what we've all been waiting for. Let's bring back our winners to play the Ask Me One More final round.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: From We Didn't Start the Fire: Paul Dreyer. From On the Colbert Report: Marc Levy. From Our Greatest Author: Meera Siddharth. From This, That, or the Other: Shannon Sun-Higginson. And from The Sound of Art: Max Genecov.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Art, take us out.

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

This, That, or the Other III

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 4:40 pm

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

And we have our next two contestants up here, chomping at the bit. Let's welcome Shannon Sun-Higginson and Jeremy Lin.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Shannon, I enjoy your job as a documentary filmmaker. What are you working on right now?

SHANNON SUN-HIGGINSON: I am working on a film about women and gaming, but it's video games, so it's the wrong type of nerd.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

EISENBERG: It's just a different shade of nerd, a different shade of nerd.

SUN-HIGGINSON: Fifty shades of nerd, yeah.

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

The Sound of Art

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Moving on, here are our next two contestants, Michelle Skinner and Max Genecov. We are happy to have you.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Michelle, are you into - do you have any hobbies, outdoor hobbies?

MICHELLE SKINNER: Not so much.

EISENBERG: Not so much.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: Sort of...

SKINNER: I'm a runner. I run.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's outdoors.

SKINNER: Yeah, yeah.

EISENBERG: Unless you run in circles in a basement.

SKINNER: Yeah.

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

On The Colbert Report

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

In front of me right now are our next two contestants. Please welcome Marc Levy and Anunta Virapongse.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Thanks for coming on ASK ME ANOTHER.

ANUNTA VIRAPONGSE: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Now, Anunta, I learned that you are about to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.

VIRAPONGSE: That is correct.

EISENBERG: That is fantastic.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

EISENBERG: And I understand, before you do that, you usually need to do a trivia show to get in the mode, right?

(LAUGHTER)

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Dr. Ruth: Let's Talk About Sex

Dr. Ruth and Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg crack each other up. Their conversation--covering sex and love in the 21st century, monogamy and a certain sexy novel--might crack you up, too.
Steve McFarland NPR

Read more
Ask Me Another
9:14 am
Fri April 5, 2013

We Didn't Start the Fire, Honest

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

From NPR and WNYC, this is ASK ME ANOTHER. I'm your host, Ophira Eisenberg, and joining me is the man with the golden guitar, Jonathan Coulton.

JONATHAN COULTON: Hello.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Hello. Let's bring up our first two contestants, why don't we? Let's welcome Rebecca Chew and Paul Dreyer.

(APPLAUSE)

PAUL DREYER: Thank you.

EISENBERG: Rebecca, you are a social science lawyer, but your hobby is quantum physics.

(LAUGHTER)

REBECCA CHEW: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

Read more
'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
9:12 am
Fri April 5, 2013

It's All Politics, Apr. 4, 2013

Susan Walsh AP
  • Listen to the Roundup

President Obama launches a brain mapping initiative, but he can't concentrate enough to shoot better than 2-for-22 on the basketball court during the annual White House Easter Egg Roll. Mark Sanford wins the GOP runoff in South Carolina and faces Stephen Colbert's sister next month. Plus, NPR's Ron Elving and health correspondent Julie Rovner on the NRA's proposal of having armed guards in schools.

The Picture Show
9:03 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Donna De Cesare's Lens On Central America, Children And Civil War

Donna De Cesare (second from left) and the family of Carlos Perez, who took the photograph. De Cesare met Perez when he was 18 years old and was involved with gangs, and they became close friends. He became her photo assistant, slowly eased out of gang life and is now a working artist.
Courtesy of Carlos Perez

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:47 pm

"Be a human first and a journalist second," Donna De Cesare once told me.

Even before she became my professor at the University of Texas, Austin, I had been well aware of De Cesare's work and the recognition it had earned her — like a Fulbright fellowship and the Dorothea Lange prize from Duke University — so I was pretty daunted by the time I enrolled.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:02 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Job Growth Slows Sharply, But Unemployment Rate Dips

Li-Wen Hung (left) and Whitney Chen were waiting to meet potential employers at a Manhattan job fair earlier this year.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 1:44 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Yuki Noguchi talks with David Greene about the latest employment report

There were just 88,000 jobs added to private and public payrolls in March, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates.

But the nation's jobless rate still edged down to 7.6 percent from 7.7 percent. That dip wasn't for a good reason, though: Nearly half a million fewer people were participating in the labor force. That smaller pool meant the jobless rate could tick down even as job growth was weak.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:12 am
Fri April 5, 2013

'Look — My Tibia!' Louisville Player Cracks 'Top 10' Jokes

Louisville basketball player Kevin Ware talking with reporters Wednesday, as coach Rick Pitino looked on.
Timothy D. Easley AP

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:57 am

You have to give Louisville basketball player Kevin Ware credit. He's a really good sport.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:45 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Korean Tensions Aren't Spurring Foreigners To Evacuate

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:53 am

The phrase "tensions are rising" has been used a lot in recent days as North Korea continues to threaten the South and the U.S.

And there were new reasons Friday morning to use that phrase:

-- "North Korea Moves Missiles, South Korean Markets Roiled." (Reuters)

Read more
The Two-Way
7:20 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Book News: Forgotten Young Adult Novels From 1930s Onward To Get New Life

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 1:58 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:43 am
Fri April 5, 2013

'Slow And Steady' Jobs Report Expected

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:55 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Yuki Noguchi talks with David Greene

Update at 8:41 a.m. ET.: Job Growth Slows Sharply, But Unemployment Rate Dips

Although economists had been expecting to hear that the U.S. economy added 200,000 jobs in March, the news is out and the number is far less. Just 88,000 jobs were added to private and public payrolls, the Labor Department reports. The jobless rate still edged down to 7.6 percent — but only because nearly half a million fewer people were in the labor force.

Read more

Pages