All Tech Considered
1:06 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

What You Emailed Us About Using The 'ACC'

We're still combing through all your emails about the acc.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 2:16 pm

This morning, I griped about the acc, our newly coined name for the practice of copying a third party on an existing email chain to undermine or pull rank on the original recipient. (The A can stand for angry, awkward, annoying ... or other A-words you might be thinking of ...)

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

For Sale: 1925 Rolls-Royce, Elephant Gun Included

This 1925 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Maharaja comes with its own big game guns. It goes up for sale on Saturday in Las Vegas.
Barrett-Jackson Auction Co.

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:31 pm

If you've got a spare $500,000 lying around, or just love rare cars, this news is for you:

A 1925 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Maharaja "tiger car," complete with an elephant gun attached to the rear bumper and a hand-cranked machine gun on a trailer, is up for auction Saturday in Las Vegas.

It's part of the Barrett-Jackson Auction Company's annual three-day sale in Sin City, which kicked off Thursday.

According to Barrett-Jackson:

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Planet Money
12:42 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

The Key To Power At The Federal Reserve? Running The Meetings

Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 12:12 pm

I am asking this sincerely: Why does it matter who the next Fed chairman will be? What difference does it make if Larry Summers or Janet Yellen or someone else heads the central bank?

More to the point: What does the Fed chairman do? What kind of power does he or she actually have?

To find out, I called Joe Gagnon, an economist who worked at the Fed for nearly 20 years and who now works at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

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Shots - Health News
12:39 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

For A Price, Volunteers Endure Scientists' Flu Spritzes

How much would a scientist have to pay you to get sick with the flu?
F.T. Werner iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:01 pm

What would it take to persuade you to allow government researchers to squirt millions of live flu viruses up your nose?

A recently concluded project at the National Institutes of Health found, among other things, that $3,400 each was enough to attract plenty of volunteers.

"I am happy I could contribute in some way," says Kelli Beyer, 24, one of 46 healthy people who volunteered for the project. To get the money, the research subjects had to commit to several days of testing, then nine days in a hospital isolation ward once the virus was administered in a nasal spray.

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Health Care
12:17 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

MacArthur Fellow Crunches Data To Streamline Health Care

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We're talking this week with some of the fellows who've won a coveted MacArthur grant this week. Those are the so-called genius grants that recognize exceptional creativity in a number of fields including the arts and public policy. Yesterday, we spoke with Angela Duckworth. She was recognized for her research on how grit and self-control contribute to educational success.

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Race
12:17 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

The Root 100: A Who's Who Of Black America

Donna Byrd is the publisher of The Root.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:18 pm

The online journal TheRoot.com, which focuses on African-American politics, culture and society, recently released its list of the 100 most important black influencers between the ages of 25 and 45. The list includes several known leaders and achievers, including NPR's own Audie Cornish, and Gene Demby and Matt Thompson of our Code Switch team. But there are also religious leaders, community activists and others who may not be household names ... yet.

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Around the Nation
12:17 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Are Somali-Americans More Likely To Be Radicalized?

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, a special court at The Hague has upheld a 50 year sentence for Liberia's former president Charles Taylor for crimes against humanity. So we thought this was a good day to hear from an international human rights lawyer who's been called the dictator hunter for bringing cases like that to the International Criminal Court. So we'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

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World
12:17 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

'Dictator Hunter' Brody: 'It's A Pleasure'

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In this part of the program, we want to talk about the question of how to achieve justice in cases that cross borders or go beyond the reach of local courts. This is a subject that's been in much of the news of late as the world continues to grapple with what to do about allegations that the Syrian regime used chemical weapons against its own people.

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World
12:17 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Gbagbo Daughter: 'My Parents Have Been Fighting For Democracy'

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:17 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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It's All Politics
12:13 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

'Green Eggs And Ham': A Quick Political History

President Obama, accompanied by first lady Michelle Obama, reads Green Eggs and Ham at the annual White House Easter Egg Roll in April 2010.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:26 pm

During the fifth hour of his televised marathon speech protesting Obamacare, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz caught the attention of Dr. Seuss fans everywhere by pulling out a copy of Green Eggs and Ham on the Senate floor to read as a bedtime story to his children.

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