Bruce Auster

Bruce Auster is NPR's National Security Editor. He's headed the unit since it was established in 2008. Auster directs NPR's coverage of international security issues from Washington – including stories involving the U.S. military, the National Security Council, and the intelligence community. As National Security editor Auster, co-ordinates coverage across NPR News desks and beats. He works closely with the Foreign Desk, Digital Media, and with reporters, editors, and producers on the National Desk.

Before taking on that role, Auster was the Senior Supervising Editor of NPR's Morning Edition for five years. In that role, he defined the editorial agenda for the show, identifying subjects and specific stories Morning Edition should be covering and then helping bring those stories to the air. Auster worked with Morning Edition hosts Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne to bring listeners interviews with leading political, international, and cultural figures.

Before joining NPR, Auster spent sixteen years as a reporter and editor at US News and World Report. He was the magazine's Pentagon correspondent for five years, covering stories from the first Gulf War to the early years of the Clinton administration. Later he did a stint covering national security and the intelligence community. Auster also served as US News's White House correspondent for two years, covering the Clinton White House and the 1996 presidential campaign. He made the jump from reporting to editing at the magazine: He was deputy national and foreign editor and later became deputy investigations editor. In that position, Auster helped direct the magazine's award-winning reporting. The investigative team broke many big stories – the subjects included Pentagon weapons scandals; billion-dollar waste in student loan programs, and the Bush administration's flawed intelligence before the Iraq war.

Iraq
4:32 pm
Wed October 22, 2014

Former Blackwater Security Guards Found Guilty In Iraq Shootings

Originally published on Wed October 22, 2014 6:28 pm

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Law
5:07 pm
Mon May 19, 2014

Fiery British Imam Found Guilty Of Terrorism Charges

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:54 pm

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In New York, a jury has found a British imam guilty on 11 counts of terrorism. Abu Hamza al-Masri was a fiery speaker at a London mosque and he's seen as an inspiration to people who later became familiar names in terror cases. People like attempted shoe bomber Richard Reid, who visited that mosque. Now, after a relatively quick trial, he's been found guilty, like several of his followers before him.

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Technology
5:09 am
Fri March 14, 2014

U.S. Monitors For Cyber Operations In Crimea Standoff

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 11:27 am

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In its standoff with Ukraine, Russia has imposed its will but it's tried to hide its hand. Russian troops moved into Crimea but in uniforms bearing no Russian insignia. And there are other tools Russia's is believed to have used that leave virtually no trace: cyber operations. They're part of the modern arsenal. Now U.S. officials want to know if the use of cyber weapons could lead to cyber war.

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National Security
4:01 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Drawn By Twitter And Trained In Syria, Terrorists Could Turn West

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 10:35 pm

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In Syria, some 1,500 groups make up the insurgency. Among them, according to U.S. intelligence officials, are 7,500 foreign fighters from more than 50 countries. They include al-Qaida veterans from Afghanistan and Pakistan and they may be taking aim beyond Syria.

JAMES CLAPPER: And they do harbor designs on attacks in Europe and the homeland.

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National Security
4:42 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

With A Citizen In The Crosshairs, Where's The Line Drawn For Drones?

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 7:58 pm

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Politics
8:26 am
Sat February 8, 2014

A Possible Explanation For How U.S. Diplomat's Call Was Tapped

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland leaves a news conference at the U.S. Embassy in Kiev on Friday. A phone call of hers about Ukraine was leaked on the Internet.
Gleb Garanich Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 12:05 pm

An American diplomat got in trouble for saying something, well, undiplomatic.

Victoria Nuland, a top State Department official, thought she was having a private phone conversation. She was speaking about developments in Ukraine with the U.S. ambassador to that country, Geoffrey Pyatt. And she was speaking bluntly, even using a not-so-choice word about America's European allies.

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The Two-Way
1:08 pm
Thu April 4, 2013

The Sky Isn't Falling Over The Korean Peninsula — Yet

In this photo released in March by the North's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), leader Kim Jong Un is said to be using a pair of binoculars to look south during an inspection of army troops stationed on two islands.
Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 2:04 pm

Almost every day, there's some new threat out of North Korea.

It's hard to determine how seriously to take these threats. War on the Korean Peninsula could be catastrophic, so the bluster can't be dismissed. On the other hand, North Korea has a long history of hyperbole, of making threats it doesn't follow through on.

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