Frank Langfitt

Frank Langfitt is NPR's London correspondent. He covers the UK and Ireland, as well as stories elsewhere in Europe. Previously, Langfitt spent five years as an NPR correspondent covering China. Based in Shanghai, he drove a free taxi around the city for a series on a changing China as seen through the eyes of ordinary people. As part of the series, Langfitt drove passengers back to the countryside for Chinese New Year and served as a wedding chauffeur. He also helped a Chinese-American NPR listener hunt for her missing sister in the mountains of Yunnan province.

While in China, Langfitt also reported on the government's infamous black jails — secret detention centers — as well as his own travails taking China's driver's test, which he failed three times.

Before moving to Shanghai, Langfitt was NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi. He reported from Sudan, covered the civil war in Somalia and interviewed imprisoned Somali pirates, who insisted they were just misunderstood fishermen. During the Arab spring, Langfitt covered the uprising and crushing of the reform movement in Bahrain.

Prior to Africa, Langfitt was NPR's labor correspondent based in Washington, D.C. He covered the 2008 financial crisis, the bankruptcy of General Motors and Chrysler and coalmine disasters in West Virginia.

In 2008, Langfitt also covered the Beijing Olympics as a member of NPR's team, which won an Edward R. Murrow Award for sports reporting. Langfitt's print and visual journalism have also been honored by the Overseas Press Association and the White House News Photographers Association.

Before coming to NPR, Langfitt spent five years as a correspondent in Beijing for The Baltimore Sun, covering a swath of Asia from East Timor to the Khyber Pass.

Langfitt spent his early years in journalism stringing for the Philadelphia Inquirer and living in Hazard, Kentucky, where he covered the state's Appalachian coalfields for the Lexington Herald-Leader. Prior to becoming a reporter, Langfitt dug latrines in Mexico and drove a taxi in his home town of Philadelphia. Langfitt is a graduate of Princeton and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard.

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Queen Elizabeth laid out the agenda for the United Kingdom's beleaguered government today, and the focus of course was Brexit.

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U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May has called for a full public inquiry into the fire at a London apartment building that killed 17 people yesterday.

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Standing outside 10 Downing St. today, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May tried to put a brave face on the disastrous results of Thursday's vote.

After calling a snap election in April in anticipation of a landslide, she ended up with an electoral train wreck, in which her Conservative Party actually lost its parliamentary majority. It now holds 318 seats.

Clinging to power, May said the Tories would form a minority government with the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland, which won 10 seats.

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Britain's prime minister, Theresa May, woke up this morning and had a duty to perform. Though her party suffered disaster in yesterday's elections and lost its majority in Parliament, the Conservatives still have the most seats.

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The terrorists struck in the heart of London as people were enjoying their Saturday night out.

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British police say they've made immense progress in their investigation into Monday night's suicide bombing in Manchester. They say they've captured a large part of a terror network operating in the city. Nine people are now in custody.

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Updated at 1:30 a.m. ET

British police have identified Salman Abedi, 22, as the bomber behind the attack on an Ariana Grande concert Monday in Manchester, England. Abedi died in the bombing, which claimed the lives of at least 22 victims and injured dozens more — many of whom were children.

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Here's the big question for British authorities. Why would one of their own citizens stage an attack that killed more than 20 people?

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Just a horrific scene last night in Manchester, England. An attacker set off a bomb at an Ariana Grande concert. At least 22 people were killed, more than 50 injured. This is the voice of Ian Hopkins. He is Chief Constable of Greater Manchester.

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We're going to hear more detail now about the attack on a pop concert in Manchester, England. Police have reported at least 19 dead and upwards of 50 people injured after explosions went off just outside the arena there.

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