Jared Brumbaugh

Jared Brumbaugh joined the PRE staff in May of 2006.  A New Bern native, he's currently a full time reporter and producer for Down East Journal.  His news spots and feature stories can also be heard during Morning Edition.  Jared is the recipient of five North Carolina Associated Press Awards for "Best Feature," "General News," "Best Health Report," "Best Weather Report," and "Best Consumer Report." When not at the station, he enjoys hiking, mountain biking, camping, fishing and paddle boarding. 

Ways to Connect

Scott Taylor Photography, Inc

  What is a typical rate of upwelling in eastern boundary current regions in meters per day?  

That’s just an example of the types of questions high school teams had to answer at this year’s National Ocean Sciences Bowl held at the Crystal Coast.  By the way, the answer is 8 meters per day.  The competition tests students’ understanding of ocean related topics as they relate to biology, chemistry, physics and geology.  To win takes more than just knowing facts. 

Attorney General Roy Cooper filed a lawsuit Tuesday against leaders of a Kinston charter school over the mishandling of public funds.  The complaint filed in Wake County Superior Court alleges CEO Ozie Hall, and the Chair of its Board Demyra McDonald-Hall falsely inflated the number of students Kinston Charter Academy would enroll so they could get more tax dollars, even though they knew the school would not be able to stay open for the 2013-2014 term.

Wolf Haven International

Federal and state officials are asking for assistance in the investigation of a red wolf death last fall.  A federally-protected red wolf was found dead Nov. 12 in Hyde County. Based on the condition of the body and other evidence, the actual date of death is estimated to be Oct. 31. The necropsy results recently received indicate the cause of death was gunshot. Anyone with information is being asked to contact the U.S.

Millions of dollars in economic loss are being attributed to House Bill 2.  This week on the Down East Journal, we explore potential losses for eastern North Carolina.  Plus, the local five sided beach treasure Fort Macon hosts the North Carolina State Park Centennial Celebration at the Crystal Coast this weekend.  And, the New York Theatre Ballet gives a free performance in Edgecombe County next Thursday.  The innovative chamber ballet company performs classical and contemporary dance as well as a premiere of a new dance in celebration of Tarboro native Hobson Pittman's paintings.

Friends of Fort Macon

As the sentinel of Beaufort Inlet and protector of the Crystal Coast, Fort Macon has stood weathering storms on the southern Outer Banks for nearly 200 years.  Since then, the five sided fortress has been converted into a popular state park and now draws more than a million people from around the world each year. Superintendent at Fort Macon State Park Randy Newman.

Laura Taylor, Center of Environmental and Resources Economic Policy at NCSU

Imagine you’re at the beach.  The sun, the sand and wind turbines?   This could soon be the reality along the coast of North Carolina.  As the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management moves forward with leasing thousands of acres to utility scale wind energy developers, dozens of 500 foot tall turbines could soon be built offshore.  Even though the technology would produce clean, renewable power, there are some downsides to wind farms, most noticeably aesthetics. 

Wind energy at our coast could be a renewable source of electricity for us, but it has some potential pitfalls, especially when it comes to tourism.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk to a NC State University researcher about a new study that finds offshore wind farms could negatively impact coastal economies.  And, we speak to Duke Energy Progress CEO Lynn Good about energy projects currently underway in eastern North Carolina, including the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and solar facilities.

NASA

On the monthly "Carolina Skies" segment, we talk about what you can spot in eastern North Carolina's night sky, from constellations and planets to nebulas and galaxies.  Our host is Byron Mumaw, president of the Carolina Skies Astronomy Club.  This week, we focus on the fifth planet from our sun and one of the brightest objects right now in the night sky, Jupiter.

This week on the Down East Journal, an unlikely partnership between a scientist and a fisherman has developed to solve a critical environmental and economic issue along the North Carolina coast.  And, baseball's past, present  and future here in eastern North Carolina.

From a gas station to a "glass station," eastern North Carolina is in for some hot art.  The town of Farmville is the future location for a hand blown glass studio.  Plus, local reaction to House Bill 2.  And, what's in store for the Oriental In-Water Boat Show next weekend.

UNC Research

There’s an environmental and economic crisis along our coast and around the world.  Oyster populations are drastically low, as compared to their numbers a century ago.  In North Carolina, oyster populations have dropped 90 percent.  But two men in Carteret County think they may have the answer to the shortage.  One is a scientist, the other is a fishermen.

ECU

As more people move to eastern North Carolina to retire or raise families, communities here are undergoing a transformation.  Take downtown areas of New Bern, Greenville and Kinston for example.  These cities have undergone major revitalization and now, boast a variety of independent shops, award winning restaurants, art galleries and craft breweries.  Now, the rural town of Farmville, home to about 5,000 people seeks to become the next creative center and cultural hub in eastern North Carolina.  Todd Edwards is a member of a volunteer association focused on economic development called The

This week on the Down East Journal, the winner of the best national park beach goes to... Cape Lookout National Seashore.  We’ll tell you why it’s so special.  Plus, North Pitt High School Lady’s Basketball team won the 2016 State Championship despite a challenging season that included the suspension of their head coach and two players.  We talk to members of the team about their hard fought victory.  And, the Historic Preservation Group of Lenoir County is looking for volunteers to participate in a local Park Day event on April 2nd.

Cape Lookout National Seashore

We’ve known all along that beaches along the North Carolina coast are the best around.  Now, so does everyone else in the United States.  USA Today named Cape Lookout National Seashore the Best National Park Beach of 2016.  Superintendent Pat Kenney. 

“We actually received an email from USA Today advising us that we had won.”

The Agnes E. Fry was a sleek, speedy watercraft as far as 1860’s technology goes.  The 225 foot, iron hulled steamer was discovered near Oak Island late last month.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with the director of the Underwater Archeology Branch of the Office of State Archeology about the wreck, its history and what they hope to learn.  Plus, elections from across the State and here in eastern North Carolina. 

NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

You’ve may have heard of the recent discovery of a Civil War era shipwreck found off the North Carolina coast.  Underwater archeologists are now almost certain the large, iron hulled vessel is the Agnes E. Fry, a confederate blockage runner that was scuttled near the mouth of the Cape Fear River in 1865.  It’s the latest Civil War-era vessel to be discovered in the area for decades.

“We knew immediately what we had when we looked at it. We were like, oh yeah.”

NASA

We begin a new monthly astronomy segment on Down East Journal called Carolina Skies.  We'll be talking about what you can spot in the night sky, from constellations and planets to nebulas and galaxies.  Our host is Byron Mumaw, president of the Carolina Skies Astronomy Club.  His fascination with astronomy began at an early age reading "Sky and Telescope" magazine and has turned, over the years, into a lifelong passion.  Today, Byron tells us about one of the most recognizable constellations in the Carolina sky.

This week on the Down East Journal, what you need to know about the new Voter ID law before you head to the polls on Tuesday.  Plus, the spring outlook on the local real estate market.  And, the wild turkey population in eastern North Carolina and around the state is at an all-time high.  Now, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission is encouraging people to take up hunting.  

This week on the Down East Journal, we explore the impact of the nursing shortage here in eastern North Carolina.  We speak with local hospital and college officials about what they're doing to train and retain nurses.  Plus, major bridge construction is underway in New Bern.  We speak with NCDOT about the road project causing some delays for commuters.

NC Wildlife Resources Commission

North Carolina’s numbers are at an all-time high.  They’ve been steadily increasing across the state, but here in the eastern part of the state, turkeys have made a major comeback.  Now, the Wildlife Resources Commission is encouraging people to take up hunting.  Seminars are being held across the state to teach amateurs and experts alike the methods for hunting turkeys. 

“That might surprise some folks that if we’re interested in conserving a game animal that we want more hunters.

Jay Clark/ECU News and Communication

Nursing is a competitive market here in eastern North Carolina, so landing a job isn’t the hard part, it’s filling the positions that’s the greatest challenge.  There are occupational nurses who work at manufacturing facilities, private nursing care in homes, nurses who treat students in schools, and of course there are hospital nurses.  It can be a stressful job with long hours but registered nurses have an earning potential of about $60,000 a year in North Carolina.

NCDOT

If your commute goes into or passes through New Bern, it may require some extra time and consideration.  North Carolina Department of Transportation crews started work on two major bridges that’s expected to last through the spring. Chris Thomas spoke to NCDOT spokesperson Brad McMannen based in Craven County about the project and how it may affect area drivers.

Dominion

The Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a three state natural gas project connecting the Virginias and North Carolina, has a new route through the southeastern part of our state.  Now, an informational meeting is set for March 29th for landowners to hear about the changes and how it may impact them.  Jared Brumbaugh has more.  

The alternative route it is located farther from residential areas, as it parallels a Progress Energy Carolinas electric transmission line east of Fayetteville. Spokesperson for Duke Energy Tammie McGee.

National Weather Service Newport/Morehead City

On Wednesday, February 23rd, severe weather moved through the area spawning two tornados.  We speak with Warning Coordination Meteorologist with the National Weather Service John Cole about damages from the storm.

Lawmakers have redrawn the state's congressional district lines and as a result, certain primaries will be pushed back to the summer.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk about how the changes may affect eastern North Carolina and the game of musical chairs local representatives face. Plus, it's been confirmed that two tornadoes touched down when severe weather moved through the region on Wednesday. We speak with the National Weather Service about damages from the storm.  And, it's music and conversation with Raleigh vocalist Jeanne Jolly.

It’s been a long few weeks for members of the General Assembly and Board of Election Employees in North Carolina.

Chris Thomas explores new changes may affect Eastern North Carolina and the game of musical chairs representatives face.

So, first thing’s first – this is not the end of the state’s congressional district squabble. More legal wrangling over this issue is virtually inevitable. 

But, last Friday, the General Assembly drew new state congressional maps, making significant changes to it and the primary voting schedule.

Homelessness among veterans is a problem, especially here in eastern North Carolina.   The numbers are trending downward, but more needs to be done.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with state and local organizations about their ambitious plan to finally end veteran homelessness.  Plus, an overview of the EF-1 tornado that touched down in Down East Carteret County.  And, Coast Guard helicopters in Elizabeth City are getting a retro makeover.

National Weather Service - Newport/Morehead City

They say if you don’t like the weather in eastern North Carolina, just wait five minutes and it’ll change. That was really the case this week as some localities had snow and ice.  But the next day it was windy and warm as a thunderstorm moved through eventually spawning a tornado in Carteret County.  The potential for severe weather didn’t come as a surprise to meteorologists who had been keeping tabs on the system days before its arrival. John Cole is the Warning Coordination Meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Newport.

NC General Assembly

The General Assembly has been called back to Raleigh to redraw North Carolina's congressional map before tomorrow’s deadline.  Jared Brumbaugh has more on how the proposed changes would impact eastern North Carolina.

Survey crews with the National Weather Service office evaluated damage from what was a strong EF-1 tornado that impacted eastern Carteret County on Tuesday.  At 8:45 a.m., a tornado warning was issued for the area.   That’s when reports of damage and sightings of a tornado touching down came into the National Weather Service office in Newport.  Lead forecaster Jim Merrill says numerous trees are down on power lines along highway 70 and power lines were knocked down in Beaufort on Front Street.

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