Jared Brumbaugh

Jared Brumbaugh joined the PRE staff in May of 2006.  He currently the  full time reporter and  producer for Down East Journal.  His news spots and feature stories can also be heard during Morning Edition.   

A New Bern native, Jared graduated from Craven Community College with an Electronics Engineering degree.  When not at the station, he enjoys playing drums, surfing, stand-up paddleboarding, and hockey.  

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ENC Features
12:22 pm
Mon August 18, 2014

Changes To NC Bear Hunting Season

Credit NC Wildlife Resources Commission

Over the past 30 years, black bear populations in North Carolina have increased fivefold.   We talk about new hunting policies in place to help stabilize their numbers.  

According to NC’s Wildlife Resources Commission, Eastern North Carolina’s black bear population has made a comeback. Today, the population sits at just over 10,000, compared to the paltry 2,000 three decades ago.

“The increase in the bear population has been occurring since the early 1980’s.”

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The Down East Journal
11:40 am
Tue August 12, 2014

The Down East Journal (08/15/14)

Over the past 30 years, black bear populations in North Carolina have increased fivefold.   This week on the Down East Journal, we talk about new hunting policies in place to help stabilize their numbers.  And, the re-located 1886 Roanoke River Lighthouse reopens to the public this weekend in Edenton. More on its history and the renovation process.  Listen for the Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations, and Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

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ENC Features
9:52 am
Mon August 11, 2014

An Audio Postcard From Band Camp

We travel to New Bern High School where students are learning music and drill for their 2014 show "Framed In Black."

We can feel summer winding down… students are savoring the last few weeks of vacation before school starts again.  But some have already returned to practice and rehearse at summer band camp.  Today, we’re at New Bern High School to hear how the marching bears preparing for a busy season.

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ENC Features
9:31 am
Mon August 11, 2014

Local Theater Seeks Stories Of Military Spouses

Cape Fear Regional Theater in Fayetteville and the Hidden Voices project are in the process of collecting stories from military spouses about finding courage in the challenges they face during and after deployment. The organizations hope to turn these stories into staged readings to help connect the military families with the greater community. Mikel Peterson has more.

Dora Bullock lives in New Bern and remembers the struggles vividly she faced during her husband’s deployment back in 2010.

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ENC Features
9:15 am
Mon August 11, 2014

Caledonia Prison Inmates Grow Their Own Food

Credit NC Department of Public Safety

Halifax County’s Caledonia Correctional Institution continues to produce thousands of pounds of crops as the years go by. Lee Jenkins has more on the self- sufficient prison farm and the impact it’s had on the community.

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The Down East Journal
12:38 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

The Down East Journal (08/08/14)

Taking advantage of summer, men are planting, growing, harvesting and canning crops at Caledonia Correctional Institution in Halifax County.  This week on the Down East Journal, we hear about the prison’s agriculture program.  And, it’s an audio postcard from band camp.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations, and Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

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ENC Features
11:32 am
Tue August 5, 2014

Local Artist Needed For Pitt County Artist In Residence Program

Credit Pitt County Arts Council

The Pitt County Arts Council at Emerge is seeking artists for their first ever Artist In Residence Program.  The deadline for applications is August 8th.  The winner will receive a nine month residency with free studio access and $2,000 instructor stipend.  Mac McKee speaks with Executive Director Holly Garriott about the program and the responsibilities of an Artist in Residence.

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ENC Regional News
12:28 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

North Carolina Boat Ramps Plagued by Buzzards

North Carolina wants the public’s help in dealing with a growing problem – buzzards at boat ramps across the state.

The state Wildlife Resources Commission says the Buzzards, also known as vultures, are federally protected birds of prey. Geoff Cantrell of the Commission’s Public Affairs says the birds have damaged vehicles and trailers.

“They are leaving scratches and torn places on vehicles and boat trailers, they are pulling at the molding around windshields, pulling at the wiper blades, they are pulling at antennas – that sort of thing.”

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ENC Features
12:05 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Inmates, Dogs Bond For A Brighter Future

Credit Brenda Malanga, New Leash On Life CCI

We travel to Craven Correctional Institution and speak with inmates who are training dogs from local animal shelters, part of the statewide New Leash On Life program.

Dogs have long been called man’s best friend. Today, we highlight the statewide prison program “New Leash on Life” aimed at training dogs for adoption and giving minimum and medium custody state prisoners a chance to turn their life around.  In June, I visited Craven Correctional Institution in Vanceboro where the program has been going strong for a decade. 

Walking through a maze of hallways and locked doors, Program Director for the New Leash on Life program at Craven Correctional Institution Brenda Malanga leads me to a building located in the interior of the prison.  A guard unlocks a door leading to an outside courtyard.  Here, four inmates are standing with their leashed dogs practicing basic commands like sit, stay and lay down.  Our presence seems to break the dog’s concentration.

 “for eight weeks, that’s pretty much what we do. It’s just all obedience training, it’s just all repetition. One thing we do not do is we do not treat train here.  It’s done by repetition and praise and affection, that’s pretty much it.”

Inmates who apply to participate in the New Leash on Life program teach their dog basic obedience, with an emphasis on house training, and socialization.  Inmate Dwayne Futrell has been working with Luna for seven weeks.

“she’s a two year old border collie corgi cross, she’s very lovable energetic.   We’ve done some certain stuff with her, just hiding stuff and she’s really good at that. She loves playing ball.”

He says training takes time, patience and persistence.

“our sit-stays and down-stays consist of, we started at like 30 seconds and we moved them up to 15 minutes of time now.  So they’re sitting in 15 minute increments for a down-stay and a sit-stay.  We do equal play like if we work for 40 minutes, we give them 40 minutes worth of play. It’s an equal thing.  They need both the same amount of exercise as they do training.”

Local animal shelters are key in identify dogs to participate in the program.  So far, more than 215 have been trained at Craven Correctional.  Furtrell says it’s hard work caring for a dog but the companionship is more than worth the challenge. 

“it’s not only a job where you’re taking care of yourself, you have to take care of them and their wellbeing. Therefore, being with them helps you be just an all-around better person.  I couldn’t see doing it without the dogs. ”

Inmates in the program start the day at 7 o’clock and lead the dogs out of their crates.  They do some indoor housetraining and then go outside to work with Drake Parker, a trainer from Top Dog Academy.  He volunteers to teach the inmates how to train their dogs.

 “Dogs can be a bridge back to everybody else, a bridge back to society is kind of how we look at it.  In fact, our motto is ‘better men one dog at a time.’  You know, sometimes you got to do something not because you’re getting paid for it, not because you’re getting something out of it, but just because it’s the right thing to do.”

Program inmates spend the rest of the day with their dog by their side.  Around 7 p.m. the dogs are crated until the next morning.  Superintendent 4 at Craven Correctional Institution Larry Dail says the 12 hour training day is beneficial for inmates.

 “they learn responsibility, then that branches off into the inmates being able to take community college classes to in veterinarian assistant tech programs, being certified dog trainers, so it’s just a win-win situation for inmates, staff and the general public. 

Craven Community College offers a 120 credit hour vet tech course at the prison where inmates can learn the skills necessary to get a job at a veterinarian’s office or an animal shelter when they are released back into society.  The North Carolina Department of Labor also offers inmates an apprentice certification which can help them land a job.  Malanga says most inmates decide to stick with the program because they have to complete 4,000 hours of on the job training and a total of 288 hours of related instruction to get the certification.

 “when the guys become primary trainers, they usually, unless they get shipped out, they make minimum custody or something like that, they’ll stay primary trainers for two or three years.”

Inmate Ruben Vargas has been involved with the New Leash on Life program for two years.   He’s training Katy, a mix mutt.

 “Man, she’s a very lovable dog. She’s a little stubborn, you know what I mean? But I’ve had worse than her.  She plays with the other dogs, she loves people.”

Vargas completed his vet tech class and is currently working on his GED.  He says training dogs has taught him responsibility and determination.

 “The dogs, that’s the easy part, you know. Dealing with people is one of the challenging things you know what I’m saying? It’s something I love doing man, and I have plans.  It’s really what I want to do when I get out.  I might give it a shot man.”

The New Leash on Life program is about second chances; the dogs get a new home and the inmates have an opportunity to turn their lives around.  Luna’s human, inmate Dwayne Futrell has been at the prison for three months. And so far, he’s already completed his vet tech class and is working to get his apprentice certification from the State Department of Labor.  He also wants to pursue a career working with dogs when he gets out of prison.

 “it just gives me something to show the community that I can better myself and I can give back to the community instead of messing up like I’ve done in my life. I can actually turn around and show what good I can do instead of what bad I can do.”

More than 215 dogs, trained at Craven Correctional, have been adopted since the New Leash on Life started in 2004. Program Director Brenda Malanga says they’ve had great success finding homes for the dogs.

 “We’ve only had one dog so far that hasn’t been adopted and we’re in the process of back and forth with her of getting her adopted. The rest of the dogs, normally by the time graduation comes around, in all other cases they’ve all been adopted.  So we’ve been really lucky.”

Since my visit last month, inmate Rueben Vargas has received his Apprenticeship Certificate from the NC State Labor Department in Dog Training.  Additionally, two more trainers have completed requirements to receive their certifications.  The eight week course that ended July 10th saw four dogs - Katie, Stella, Bud and Luna - complete the New Leash on Life training.  Malanga says so far, three of the four dogs have found new homes, except for two year old Luna.  New Leash On Life a program held across the state.  It was announced this week that Eastern Correctional Institution in Greene County is closing as a men's prison and will be converted to a minimum security women's prison. There are four dogs there that have been in training for about 3 weeks. All of them are healthy, heart worm negative, spayed or neutered and current on vaccinations.  The dogs need to be adopted by the end of August.  If you’re interested in adopting Luna or any of the dogs trained through the New Leash on Life program, go to our website, publicradioeast.org. 

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ENC Regional News
11:45 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Cape Look Out Extends Comment Period on Off-Road Vehicle Plan

The Cape Lookout National Seashore will extend the comment period for their Off-Road Vehicle Plan by 45 days. Jared Brumbaugh has more.

Superintendent of Cape Lookout National Seashore Pat Kenney says they received a request asking for an extension due to the impacts of Hurricane Arthur.

“We looked at the rationale that they provided in that latter and they requested the extension be granted because the hurricane came through in July and disrupted people’s lives.”

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ENC Features
11:38 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Somerset Place Hosts Statewide "Freedom For All" Exhibit

Credit www.nchistoricsites.org

This week, a statewide traveling exhibit called “Freedom For All” went on display at a plantation in Washington County.   The exhibit includes illustrated panels which tell the story of slavery in North Carolina before, during and after the Civil War.  Freedom For All will be on display at the Somerset Place State Historic Site in Creswell until August 23rd.   Built in the 1780’s, the plantation was one of the largest in the South during the antebellum era.  It started as a business venture for three Edenton men in 1785 to grow rice.  This week, I spoke with Assistant Site Manager Amber Sat

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ENC Features
11:29 am
Fri August 1, 2014

Greenville's Tar River Legacy Plan

Cities and towns across Eastern North Carolina are beginning to view their rivers as a source of recreation and revenue, and Greenville is no exception. Today, Lee Jenkins tells us about the Tar River Legacy Plan.

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ENC Regional News
12:13 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Summer Hail Hits Eastern North Carolina

Severe weather on Monday spawned reports of hail damage in Eastern North Carolina. Lee Jenkins reports.

Craven and Pamlico County were pelted with hail caused by Monday afternoon’s severe thunderstorms. The National Weather Service says the City of Havelock took the brunt of it. Minnesott Beach, Charles Street, and the Cherry Point marine base had reports of golf ball sized hail, two inches in diameter. Gumbranch Park in Havelock had hail the size of baseballs, and sixty-five mile-per-hour wind gusts were recorded near Cherry Point.

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The Down East Journal
10:59 am
Wed July 30, 2014

The Down East Journal (08/01/14)

  This week on the Down East Journal, we travel to Craven Correctional Institution and speak with inmates who are training dogs from local animal shelters, part of the statewide New Leash On Life program.  And, a picture of the Tar River Legacy Plan, which seeks to develop Greenville’s waterfront.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations, and Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

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ENC Features
9:26 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Eastern Seaboard Opens For Offshore Energy Exploration

A pod of bow-riding Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis) offshore from Cape Lookout. In North Carolina, they live in warm temperate waters along the continental shelf.
Credit Dr. Craig A. Harms, NC State University

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is allowing offshore energy exploration to take place along the East Coast, using controversial seismic air guns to find gas and oil deposits.  A feature about the surveys and the safeguards in place to mitigate impacts to marine life.

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ENC Features
9:13 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Conversation with Lisa Fischer

Credit www.lisafischermusic.com

We speak with highly praised and often used background singer Lisa Fischer about her Oscar award winning documentary "Twenty Feet From Stardom" and her performance in Raleigh on Saturday, July 26th.

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The Down East Journal
11:12 am
Wed July 23, 2014

The Down East Journal (07/25/14)

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is allowing offshore energy exploration to take place along the East Coast, using controversial seismic air guns to find gas and oil deposits.  This week on the Down East Journal, a feature about the surveys and the safeguards in place to mitigate impacts to marine life.  And, sought after background vocalist Lisa Fischer talks with us about her career and her Saturday night performance at the North Carolina Museum of Art.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations, and Saturday at noon on News and Ideas.

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ENC Features
12:00 pm
Sat July 19, 2014

Study Explores Economic Potiental for Highway 70

N.C. 44, the first section of the future U.S. 70 Goldsboro Bypass, now open to traffic north of Goldsboro from I-795 to Wayne Memorial Drive.
Credit North Carolina Department of Transportation

A recently released study found that upgrading highway 70 could bring economic prosperity to eastern North Carolina. 

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ENC Regional News
2:02 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

Mining and Energy Commission Holding Fracking Hearings

North Carolina’s Mining and Energy Commission will accept public comments on its proposed oil and gas development regulations. Lee Jenkins reports.

The regulations were drafted in response to the Energy Modernization Act, which legalized fracking. The Commission is currently allowing citizens to offer suggestions and feedback to the proposed rules via written and oral comments. While the commission will examine all comments, it will more heavily consider suggestions with a strong factual basis. Commissioner Jim Womack:

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ENC Regional News
1:57 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

City of Washington Recieves Grant for Historic District

The City of Washington will soon resurvey its Historic District using grant money from the National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Fund.  The grant amounts to 11,000 dollars, and the District is one of the largest of its kind in the state. According to Washington’s Community Development Planner Jennifer Brenan, the survey may take up to a year to complete.

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