Jared Brumbaugh

Jared Brumbaugh joined the PRE staff in May of 2006.  A New Bern native, he's currently a full time reporter and producer for Down East Journal.  His news spots and feature stories can also be heard during Morning Edition.  Jared is the recipient of five North Carolina Associated Press Awards for "Best Feature," "General News," "Best Health Report," "Best Weather Report," and "Best Consumer Report." When not at the station, he enjoys hiking, mountain biking, camping, fishing and paddle boarding. 

Ways to Connect

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

A large scale sea grass study, the first of its kind, is underway at the coast.  Artificial seagrass meadows will be built in Back Sound this spring to observe how fragmenting affects fish colonization. 

This week on the Down East Journal, NCDOT's 10-year transportation plan lists more than 1,400 infrastructure projects across the state. We focus on major highway improvements in eastern North Carolina and the impact they may have for the region's commuters and visitors.  Plus, a large scale sea grass study – the first of its kind - is underway at the coast.  And, the Craven Literacy Council is holding a tutor training workshop for people who want to help adults improve their literacy skills.

This week on the Down East Journal, local governments are preparing to craft their budgets for the next fiscal year.  We focus on Pitt County's capital improvement plans.  And, it's chamber music in Greenville as East Carolina University holds their winter workshop concerts.

ECU News Services

  

Researchers at East Carolina University in Greenville are using gastric bypass surgery to help patients with diabetes.

Hundreds of millions of dollars have been set aside for recovery following Hurricane Matthew and subsequent flooding.  This week on the Down East Journal, we examine where that money will help eastern North Carolina.  Plus, what Christmas in the colonial capital of North Carolina was like in the 18th century.  And, the Tar River Swing Band performs a concert of Christmas music next week.

This week on the Down East Journal, we examine how cold temperatures affect sea turtles and manatees passing by the North Carolina coast as they head south for the winter.  Plus, hospitals in eastern North Carolina are still dealing with the impacts of a nationwide drug shortage while learning how to work around it.  And, the ninth annual Christmas Candlelight Tour takes place in Beaufort.

Cole Dittmer/Tryon Palace

In 1770, Christmas at Tryon Palace in New Bern was vastly different than the way we celebrate today.  Food, however, has always played a major role in the season.

The largest utility-scale biogas plant in the United States breaks ground near Warsaw.  Jared Brumbaugh has more.

The $100 million dollar facility will convert methane gas from hog waste lagoons into clean energy, capable of generating approximately 290,000 MWH of electricity per year, enough to power 32,000 homes annually.  The electricity will be purchased by Duke Energy and sent to nearby power plants.  Spokesman Randy Wheeless. 

Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue

As temperatures fall and water temperatures cool, cold stunning can occur in sea turtles and manatees that haven't migrated south for the winter.  Volunteers are prepared to rescue, rehabilitate and relocate marine life impacted by cold stunning.

It's been 75 years since the attack on Pearl Harbor.  A program in Goldsboro on December 7th detailed the surprise attack and wove the impact and experiences of Wayne County people into the presentation.

It’s been 75 years since the bombing of Pearl Harbor.  This week on the Down East Journal, we detail a program in Goldsboro detailing the surprise attack, and the effect it had on Wayne County residents who survived. And, a new study shows that North Carolina has some of the lowest prices for ecstasy in the United States which could make it a hot spot for the production and sale of the illicit drug. 

This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to Superintendent Pat Kenney about the future of Cape Lookout National Seashore.  He’s leaving eastern North Carolina next year for a job at Yellowstone National Park.  And, how to keep the conversations civil this holiday season if they steer toward politics.

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

Local scientists have increased monitoring of the Neuse River and Pamlico Sound following Hurricane Matthew.  Algal blooms and low dissolved oxygen are a few of the problems being detected due to nutrient loads and storm water runoff. 

The election is over but all results aren't final.  This week on the Down East Journal, officials are counting provisional ballots in the canvass.  We'll talk about how that process will work in Craven and Wilson counties.  Plus, the environmental impact of Hurricane Matthew on the Neuse River and the Pamlico Sound. And, it's conversation with local celebrity chef Vivian Howard.  Just in time for the holidays, she released her first cookbook, "Deep Run Roots: Stories and Recipes from My Corner of the South."

ECU News Services

 We detail a new pilot program started by two medical students in Greenville that seeks to help military veterans transition back to civilian life.

N.C. Department of Agriculture

Agriculture is the number one industry in North Carolina contributing $78 billion to the state's economy. Much of the food produced in our state comes from eastern North Carolina, which was recently pounded with heavy rainfall during Hurricane Matthew  leaving crops flooded and fields ravaged.  Jared Brumbaugh spoke with the Director of the Farm Service Agency Bob Etheridge after surveying in Edgecombe County.

National Institutes of Health - Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

As the baby boomer generation ages and people live longer, a new trend has emerged from the growing population of older adults.  Elder abuse affects approximately 1 in 10 seniors, according to the National Council on Aging.  

We examine the way our swing state ‘swung’ and local races that made headline news in eastern North Carolina.  Plus, the rescheduled Mum Fest finally gets its turn this weekend, we hear what’s scheduled during this annual New Bern event.  And, we detail a new pilot program started by two medical students in Greenville that seeks to help military veterans transition back to civilian life.

It’s estimated there’s hundreds of millions of dollars in damages to agriculture and livestock in North Carolina due to Hurricane Matthew. We speak to the director of the State Farm Agency Bob Etheridge who was in eastern North Carolina recently to survey the damage firsthand. Plus, we visit areas hit hard by Hurricane Matthew to explore what affect the flooding had on early voting turnout. And, elder abuse affects 1 in 10 seniors.  We detail a new screening tool that helps improve identification of elder abuse.

Hurricane Matthew recovery continues throughout eastern North Carolina including Duplin County hit hard during the storm.  Plus, flooding, downed trees and washouts were reported across eastern North Carolina prompting dozens of road closures in our area. We speak with DOT Secretary Nick Tennyson about repair efforts underway.  And how to incorporate creepy-crawly plants into your landscape during the Garden Journal.

Some residents in ENC have started to clean up from flooding while others are still displaced.  We have updates from Kinston, Greenville and Vanceboro.  Plus, 27 counties in eastern North Carolina are eligible for disaster assistance.  We talk to a FEMA representative about how to apply.

Thousands of residents and business owners impacted by flooding across eastern North Carolina have started the long process of recovery.  


Flooding, downed trees and wash outs were reported across eastern North Carolina during Hurricane Matthew prompting dozens of road closures in our region.  It’s been nearly three weeks since the storm, and crews with the North Carolina Department of Transportation have been out in full force making repairs to roads and bridges.  Some of the highways have reopened, others will remain closed for some time.   Jared Brumbaugh spoke with State DOT Secretary Nick Tennyson about repair efforts underway.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has approved a 31-day extension for applications. Residents now have until Jan. 9, 2017, to register with FEMA. The extension also applies to homeowners, renters and businesses submitting applications for low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration.  Registration is open in 45 counties.

Now that Hurricane Matthew has come and gone, some in eastern North Carolina are dealing with catastrophic flooding.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with Beaufort County residents saving personal items from rising floodwaters and visit an emergency shelter in Greenville.

Eighteen people lost their lives on North Carolina highways riding bicycles last year.  This week on the Down East Journal, we talk about new laws that took affect October 1st that aim to curb the number of crashes.  Plus, addiction to opioids like heroine is a nationwide epidemic hitting eastern North Carolina hard.  The latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control have four eastern counties with drug overdose rates above the state average.  A recent study from a major, healthcare provider put multiple eastern cities in the top 25 nationwide for the rate of opioid abusers.

Some residents living near a tributary of the Tar River in Beaufort County were told to evacuate their homes in the middle of the night because water levels were quickly rising. The next day, many went back with jon boats and kayaks to rescue personal items from their homes.

NCDOT

We’ve all seen the bright yellow signs along eastern North Carolina roadways … “share the road.” 

“You’re going straight, and they pass you, and they turn in front of you. So you have to slam on your brakes because otherwise you’ll hit the car.”

Avid cyclist and New Bern resident Joe Baes rides about 100 miles a week, sometimes 2 or 300.

“Instead of freaking out, just… hey, pay attention to what you’re doing, be careful.  Then you get flipped off and then you drive away.”

Multiple roadways are closed in eastern North Carolina due to damage and flooding. Motorists are advised to stay alert and adhere to special traveling conditions implemented by local authority in their area.  If a flooded roadway is encountered, turn around and seek an alternate route.

The following schools are closed  or  have delayed openings  this week: (as of 10/21 1645)

Lenoir County Public Schools -  operate on a 2-hour delay Monday. Tuesday thru Friday will be regular school days. Early-out day on Thursday and the teacher's workday Friday will be regular school days.

Lenoir Community College - classes resume Oct. 24

Wayne Community College -  reopen for students on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 20 and 21, but will be closed Saturday, Oct. 22.

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