Jared Brumbaugh

Jared Brumbaugh joined the PRE staff in May of 2006.  A New Bern native, he's currently a full time reporter and producer for Down East Journal.  His news spots and feature stories can also be heard during Morning Edition.  Jared is the recipient of five North Carolina Associated Press Awards for "Best Feature," "General News," "Best Health Report," "Best Weather Report," and "Best Consumer Report." When not at the station, he enjoys hiking, mountain biking, camping, fishing and paddle boarding. 

Ways to Connect

Wolf Haven International

The U.S. Fish Wildlife Service has decided to continue their nearly 30 year conservation effort of the endangered red wolf in northeastern North Carolina.  But conservation groups aren’t happy with the announcement.  

University of California - Riverside

Today on the Down East Journal, we explore how prepared local healthcare providers are when it comes to the uncertainty surrounding Zika infection and microcephaly in infants.

According to the North Carolina Division of Public Health, southeastern North Carolina has the highest birthrate in the state.  This fact may play in favor of early detection and early intervention should Zika become a real threat here in eastern North Carolina.

NC Sea Turtle Project

The sea turtle nesting season is winding down and the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is reporting it's a record year.  So far, there have been 1,636 nests counted along 330 miles of ocean facing sandy beaches in our state.  That number is up from last year's count of 1,300 nests and it's a significant jump from 2014 where 565 nests were reported. 

North Carolina workers are among the least unionized in the country and many blame, or credit, the state's culture and "Right-to-Work" laws.  That's especially true in eastern North Carolina's primarily agricultural and service based economy. This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to local labor leaders and labor law experts on where workers stand in the region and the role they may play in a new labor movement. Plus, we explore how prepared local healthcare providers are when it comes to the uncertainty of Zika infection and microcephaly in infants.

This week on the Down East Journal, the Washington Development Tourism Authority calls for artists to submit paintings of waterfowl for the 2017-2018 North Carolina Duck Stamp Competition. Plus, the skies will be clear as Tropical Storm Hermine moves out of the region.  Hear how you can track planetary movement on “Carolina Skies.”  And, music and conversation with Asheville’s “The Broadcast.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Red Wolf Recovery Program is responsible for the reintroduction of the species declared biologically extinct in the 1980s.  Now, after decades of work, they may dismantle the program all together. This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with local conservation groups who recently held rallies to show their support and we hear from private landowners in the red wolf recovery area that want to see the program end.

As students return to East Carolina University in Greenville, many people are surprised to learn that there’s an increase in demand for counselors to address student anxiety.  Chris Thomas visits ECU to shed some light on the trend.  Plus, we stop by Safe Harbor Farm in Maysville, a non-profit whose mission has shifted over the past year.  And, as communities in our area strive to become more bicycle and pedestrian friendly, we talk about a statewide grant initiative helping local towns and cities build bike paths and sidewalks.

Google Maps

Hammocks Beach State Park wants the public to weigh in on how to develop 290 acres of mainland property.  Jared Brumbaugh has more.

Right now, the site is mostly wooded except for the dilapidated remains of a 4-H camp and Future Farmers of America camp.  It was purchased for $10 million last spring to make the park a year round destination.  Friends of the Hammocks and Bear Island David Pearson says an online survey asks people what amenities they want on the mainland property.

Well owners living near Duke Energy coal ash facilities have been notified that they’ll receive a permanent alternate drinking water supply.  A letter was sent to about 1,000 households this week.  Jared Brumbaugh has more. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Red Wolf Recovery Program is responsible for the reintroduction of the species declared biologically extinct in the 1980s.  Now, after decades of work, they may dismantle the program all together. Local conservation groups recently held rallies to show their support, while some private landowners in the red wolf recovery area want to see the program end. 

We love our furry companions, for better or worse.  But when it comes to changing your dog’s behavior, training tends to focus on making them respond to human commands in order to make them act more human.  But a local non-profit has made it their mission to move people to a new way of thinking about pet training and behavior. 

NCDOT

More and more communities in eastern North Carolina are striving to be more bicycle and pedestrian friendly.  Building sidewalks or bike paths connects people with commercial areas, promotes healthy lifestyles and increases aesthetic appeal. The North Carolina Department of Transportation is paving the way to help municipalities develop plans that encourage safe walking and biking.  Mac McKee speaks with Planning program manager with NCDOT’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Division John Vine-Hodge about the grant initiative.  

August 18th marks Marine Corp Air Station’s Cherry Point’s 75th anniversary and there will be a ceremony on the flight line marking the occasion.  Jared Brumbaugh has more.

North Carolina Coastal Federation

Living shorelines are effective at slowing erosion, providing habitat and improving water quality.  Now, the North Carolina Coastal Federation wants to install more than 2,000 liner feet of living shoreline in eastern North Carolina's sounds, bays, rivers, and waterways. 

NC State Ports Photo

With an expansion project now complete, the Port of Wilmington is able to handle larger container ships carrying more cargo.  Jared Brumbaugh has more. 

This week on the Down East Journal,the science of living shorelines and their ecological benefits.  Efforts are underway to construct more than 2,000 linear feet of living shoreline in eastern North Carolina’s sounds, bays, rivers, and waterways.  And, craft breweries are a burgeoning business in North Carolina. We meet a couple who make it a point to visit each one… and they’re having a hard time keeping up. This week, it’s a guide to North Carolina Craft Beer & Breweries.

This week on the Down East Journal, the City of Jacksonville with the help of coastal scientists are maintaining the health of Wilson Bay using green infrastructure.  Plus, North Carolina voters are once again in limbo after a federal court struck down the 2013 Voter ID law.  We talk to local officials about their precincts, how they've dealt with three tumultuous and erratic years and about what the future may hold.  And, snakes are out and about this summer. Tips on how to stay safe in the woods, on the trail or in your own backyard. 

The summer is a perfect time for outdoor recreation.  Whether you enjoy fishing, hiking, camping or gardening in your backyard, be on the lookout for snakes.  Public Radio East's Mac McKee speaks with Dr. Sean Bush, a venom expert at ECU's Brody School of Medicine.  Dr. Bush as appeared on Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, National Geographic and PBS, and was featured on the show "Venom ER."

City of Jacksonville Media Services - Kevin Reopelle

Living shorelines, wetland restoration, oyster reefs.  Green infrastructure is an effective and proven method of increasing coastal resilience, stabilizing the shoreline and cleaning the waters in estuaries and the sounds of eastern North Carolina.  But can the approach be used farther upstream in brackish water, in more urban settings to restore polluted waterways?  The City of Jacksonville and local scientists are trying to answer that question.

UPDATE: Rocky Mount has changed their mind about removing Pokemon Go locations at parks and city properties.  After a review of parks and facilities, the city decided not to remove Pokemon Go sites, unless there’s a specific hazard at the park. 

If you recognize that theme, you may be among the 75 million people playing Pokemon Go.  The wildly popular app has young and old alike wandering around, phone in hand, searching for Pikachu, Charmander, and Squirtle.  In an effort to cover this new craze, I set off to find poke players and had no trouble at all.

Rip currents have been making headlines lately with deaths along North Carolina's coast attributed to these swift, powerful channels of water.  To help keep you and your family safe this summer, Public Radio East’s Mac McKee speaks with Atlantic Beach Fire Chief Adam Snyder about how to break the grip of the rip.

Pokemon Go is causing issues here in eastern North Carolina.  We speak with community colleges about how they’re dealing with an influx of people coming on campus and we talk to local officials concerned with player safety.  Plus, Fisher Houses offer toys, beds, and breathing space for military families adjusting to new lives.  We explore eastern North Carolina based Fisher Houses.  Camp Lejeune has one and the newest opened at Ft. Bragg. And, do you know what to do if you are caught in a rip current?  Find out this week on the Down East Journal.

People in the sailing capital of North Carolina won’t have to drive far to get groceries anymore.  A ribbon cutting takes place Wednesday July, 27th on a new Piggly Wiggly in Oriental.  Jared Brumbaugh reports.

People in the sailing capital of North Carolina won’t have to drive far to get groceries anymore.  A ribbon cutting takes place Wednesday July, 27th on a new Piggly Wiggly in Oriental.  Jared Brumbaugh reports.

 

This week on the Down East Journal, we detail the state’s first ever wind farm currently under construction near Elizabeth City.  The project has drawn criticism from some who are proposing legislation aimed at limiting future construction elsewhere in the region. We speak to local environmentalists and state representatives on the future of wind farms in eastern North Carolina.  And, 29 eastern North Carolina Arts Councils are seeking applications for regional artists grants of up to $1,000 in financial support for art projects.

Thousands of dead fish have washed up on the banks of the Neuse River, near Flanners Beach.  Scientists believe the fish kill could get worse before it gets better.  Jared Brumbaugh has more. 

Tryon Palace

Dancing, singing, and drumming.  Jonkonnu is a long celebrated African American tradition.  It’s roots can be traced back to the 1800’s in Jamaica and to the people of West Africa.  This cultural practice is being preserved and taught this summer at Tryon Palace with free workshops every Tuesday, now through Aug. 5th.  The workshops culminate with a public student performance of Jonkonnu Friday, Aug. 9, at 2 p.m.  Jared Brumbaugh has this audio postcard.

Local towns along the coast are stepping up efforts to make beaches safer and more accessible.  Atlantic Beach is rolling out plastic walkways each morning to provide a stable surface for wheelchairs.  Emerald Isle is focusing on reducing the number of drownings with the installation of over 100 flotation devices along the surf.

This week on the Down East Journal, ECU's School of Music celebrates the 20th anniversary of it's guitar festival, four days of concerts and workshops that attract students and experts from across the nation.  We speak to organizers and participants about the Greenville festival's growth and vision.  Plus, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is seeking input from local hunters on white-tailed deer management in a statewide survey.  And, a new art exhibit called "Summertime" opens at the Crystal Coast.

Melissa McGaw, NCWRC

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is calling on hunters to help out with a statewide deer hunting survey to help improve deer management.  The current study expounds on another conducted in 2006 with 10,000 hunters.  Officials hope to reach over 220,000 this time.

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