Jared Brumbaugh

Jared Brumbaugh joined the PRE staff in May of 2006.  A New Bern native, he's currently a full time reporter and producer for Down East Journal.  His news spots and feature stories can also be heard during Morning Edition.  Jared is the recipient of five North Carolina Associated Press Awards for "Best Feature," "General News," "Best Health Report," "Best Weather Report," and "Best Consumer Report." When not at the station, he enjoys hiking, mountain biking, camping, fishing and paddle boarding. 

Ways to Connect

Contributed Photo; Ken Banks

You don’t normally associate manatees with North Carolina, but an increase in sightings have been reported this summer.  We talk to a Carteret County man about his recent run in with a manatee. 

Contributed video. Used with permission from Ken Banks.

This week on the Down East Journal, re-enactors and historians are gearing up for Saturday’s Bentonville Battlefield artillery living history program.  We’ll tell you what’s in store.  And, a newly commissioned art installation is taking shape in downtown Kinston celebrating eastern North Carolina’s tobacco heritage.  Those stories and more, Friday at noon on all of the Public Radio Stations on the Down East Journal.

Thomas Sayer

Once known for its tobacco history, Kinston is trying to transition into a destination for art and culture.  Today, we hear learn about a new seven-piece installation by famous sculptor Thomas Sayre.

Kinston has undergone a bit of a renaissance in recent years. The area is now home to a thriving art community, a craft brewery, award-winning restaurants, and a rich history. Much of that history goes back to the early 1900’s when tobacco farming here was a way of life. Kinston Community Art Council Executive Director Sandy Landis.

We explore local frustration over the new NC Farm ID requirement concerning backyard chickens.  Some residents are scoffing at the penalty free obligation, regarding it an invasion of privacy.  But state agriculture officials are warning of an potentially devastating outbreak of avian influenza.

“It’s something I look forward to every morning.  Coming out here and collecting eggs, and the kids like to feed them and collect the eggs too”

That’s New Bern resident Genevieve Daniels. She’s raised a flock chickens for four years now, for fun and for food.

It’s a fact, an avian flu outbreak would cripple our local economy.  This week on the Down East Journal we explore local frustration over the new NC Farm ID requirement concerning backyard chickens.  Some residents are scoffing at the penalty free obligation, regarding it an invasion of privacy.  But state agriculture officials are warning of a worst case scenario. Both sides make their case – Friday at noon on all of the Public Radio Stations on the Down East Journal.

To view the NC Farm ID form, go to http://www.ncagr.gov/ncfarmid/ 

Clues are being uncovered at an archeological site in Bertie County that may reveal what happened to the Lost Colony of Roanoke. 

Classic yellow buses with stop arms out will mark the beginning of another school year.  But more and more drivers in eastern North Carolina are ignoring the most basic of safety rules.  So now, school districts in Pitt, Martin, Nash, and New Hanover counties are taking measures into their own hands, literally.  Sarah Finch has more.

Core Sound Waterfowl Museum

Whether its baseball, basketball, football, hockey, lacrosse or soccer, sports are everywhere.  They’re a part of our history and culture in eastern North Carolina and around the country.  The traveling Smithsonian exhibit “Hometown Teams,” which is now on display on Harkers Island, connects small communities across the United States to paint a picture on how sports shape American.  This week, Mac McKee speaks with the Director of the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum Karen Amspacher about the exhibit.

You’ve seen the videos, heart stopping close calls for students and bus drivers.  This week on the Down East Journal, how local school systems are beefing up safety protocols as kids head into the new school year.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on New and Ideas. 

Uprooted Photographer

Florida-based marine research and recovery corporation Intersal has sued the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources over rights to the Queen Anne’s Revenge after withdrawing a similar case from the Office of Administrative Hearings in June. Lee Jenkins has more on the lawsuit and what led up to it.

NOAA

It's been quiet in the tropics this hurricane season, and that trend will continue according to forecasters.  The updated forecast from the NOAA's Climate Prediction Center indicates that a below-normal hurricane season is very likely. The outlook calls for a 90% chance of a below-normal season, the highest probability given by NOAA for any such season since their seasonal hurricane outlooks began in August 1998.

Luis Lamar, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Scientists were on an expedition more than a hundred miles off the coast of North Carolina when they accidently discovered a centuries old shipwreck.  We speak with the expedition leader about their rare find and the artifacts that lie more than a mile below the ocean’s surface. 

Scientists were on an expedition more than a hundred miles off the coast of North Carolina when they accidently discovered a centuries old shipwreck.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with the expedition leader about their rare find and the artifacts that lie more than a mile below the ocean’s surface.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on New and Ideas. 

The North Carolina History Center in New Bern is hosting "The Tuscarora World and New Bern In Maps."  It's a new, free exhibit of 15 rare maps depicting the North Carolina coastal region and Tuscarora history from 1590 to 1800.  Lee Jenkins visited the History Center and has this audio tour of the exhibit.

A public hearing on a proposed water quality permit for Duke Energy Progress' Sutton Energy Complex has been moved to August 6. Jared Brumbaugh has more.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources is collecting public comments on the draft modified wastewater and stormwater discharge permit for the electrical generating plant, located west of Wilmington. Modifications to the permit were prompted by DENR's reclassification of Sutton Lake from "treatment unit" to the "waters of the state."

The City of New Bern has begun resurfacing roads across town. Lee Jenkins has more.

The city plans to resurface 14 roads over the course of the next 120 days. Currently, construction crews are working on Trent Road, 2nd Avenue, 3rd Street, and 5th street. After that crews will begin working in the Pembroke subdivision and the Sunnyside neighborhood. Crews will finish by resurfacing the road to Derby Park and parts of Elizabeth Avenue. Director of Public Works Matt Montaigne says the city will try to make the process as painless for commuters as possible.

As summer continues, vector-borne diseases become more prevalent in Eastern NC. Lee Jenkins has more on Onslow County’s vector-borne disease season.

Long, hot days and summer showers provide the perfect breeding ground for ticks and mosquitoes, who in turn incubate diseases like Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and West Nile Virus. Several probable cases of these diseases and others, like Lyme Disease and Eastern Equine Encephalitis, were reported during the spring and summer in Onslow County.

NCDENR

How safe is your beach?  We talk to the State Recreational Water Quality Program Manager about testing the water at more than 200 locations, from Corolla to Sunset Beach.

When it comes to a trip to the beach, there are hazards you are aware of.  Sunburn, getting caught in a rip current, stepping on a shell or piece of glass, or in very rare cases, being bitten by a shark.  But there’s also hazards you may not consider, such as water quality.  

How safe is your beach?  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak to the State Recreational Water Quality Program Manager about testing the water at more than 200 locations, from Corolla to Sunset Beach.  And why sometimes, they have to issue a swimming advisory.  Plus, we take an audio tour of a new exhibit in New Bern detailing the history of the Tuscarora Nation with 15 rare maps.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on New and Ideas. 

http://www.beaufortbridgefacts.org/

We hear an update on the construction of the high rise bridge from Morehead City to Beaufort.  

Communing between the coastal communities of Beaufort and Morehead City will be a lot less stressful once a new high rise bridge is operational over Gallants Channel.   The project, which has been in the works for 20 years, is well on its way to completion.

There’s a public meeting on Wednesday (07/29/15) to discuss the temporary ban on target shooting in the Croatan National Forest, in portions of Jones, Craven, and Carteret counties.  Jared Brumbaugh has more. 

After receiving hundreds of complaints from locals, the U.S. Forest Service banned target shooting in the Croatan for 120 days.  The closure took effect July 13th.  District Ranger Jim Gumm says concerns about public safety prompted the ban.

Over 60 residents have a new place to call home. A 2.2 million dollar facility recently opened its doors in Greenville. The high-tech shelter is called Community Crossroads Place. Sarah Finch speaks with the Executive Director Bob Williams about how the new space will help them better serve the homeless in Pitt County. 

A new community shelter recently opened in Greenville, providing safe housing for more than 60 residents.  This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with Executive Director Bob Williams about the high-tech 2.2 million dollar facility and their mission to help the less fortunate in Pitt County.  Also, we hear an update on the construction of the high rise bridge from Morehead City to Beaufort.  And, a native of Lenoir County whose efforts in multiple American wars, including as a major figure in the state during the Civil War, have been lost to history has his story told by a fellow nativ

R. Evans, North Carolina State Parks

Parks and museums across the state have begun preparing for Governor McCrory’s Connect NC investment program and the funding it would provide them.  Lee Jenkins spoke with the directors for Hammocks Beach Park and the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum about what the program would mean for their facilities.

Byron Toothman, North Carolina Coastal Reserve

Large floating mats of red algae continue to wash up on some parts of the coast choking out native plants and animal species. This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with North Carolina Coastal Reserve Research Biologist Byron Toothman about the impacts of this quickly-growing, invasive seaweed and how it’s altering our coastal ecosystem.  

It’s a “growing” problem.  Large floating mats of red algae continue to wash up on some parts of the coast choking out native plants and animal species. This week on the Down East Journal, we speak with North Carolina Coastal Reserve Research Biologist Byron Toothman about the impacts of this quickly-growing, invasive seaweed and how it’s altering our coastal ecosystem.  The Down East Journal, Friday at noon on all of the PRE stations.  And Saturday at noon on New and Ideas. 

Following eight shark attacks this summer, another seaside town is enacting fishing restrictions. Jared Brumbaugh has more.

Effective today, Pine Knoll Shores is banning all fishing at ten heavily used beach access location. Town Manager Brian Kramer says the plan designates a 200 yard area at each site for swimming only. He says anglers will have to move to the right or left of these restricted areas in order to fish.

"Most fishermen we think do that already out of courtesy, but we don't want to have bait in the water while folks are swimming."

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

It's summer-time, the flowers are in bloom and butterflies and bees are doing what they’ve always done.  But there’s been a decline in their numbers here in North Carolina and around the United States.  A new federal plan aims to reverse trend with an “all hands on deck” approach. Sarah Finch has more.

UNC Institute of Marine Sciences

Black sea bass are making a comeback in North Carolina after the species was overfished a decade ago.  We visit the Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City where they’re using ear bones from hundreds of black sea bass to learn which habitats along our coast best support the fishery. 

State officials advise residents to wear their life jackets when boating. Lee Jenkins has more.

Boating Safety Coordinator Major Chris Huebner says the most important safety measure any boater can take is to wear their life jacket. The primary cause of death in boating accidents is drowning, which life jackets go a long way towards preventing. Huebner says that even with a drunken operator or in bad weather, a life jacket would likely save lives.

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